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Publisher's Summary

Getting to Yes is a straightorward, universally applicable method for negotiating personal and professional disputes without getting taken - and without getting angry.

It offers a concise, step-by-step, proven strategy for coming to mutually acceptable agreements in every sort of conflict - whether it involves parents and children, neighbors, bosses and employees, customers or corporations, tenants or diplomats. Based on the work of the Harvard Negotiation Project, a group that deals continually with all levels of negotiation and conflict resolution, from domestic to business to international, Getting to Yes tells you how to:

  • Separate the people from the problem
  • Focus on interests, not positions
  • Work together to create opinions that will satisfy both parties
  • Negotiate successfully with people who are more powerful, refuse to play by the rules, or resort to "dirty tricks"

©2011 Roger Fisher, William Ury, and Bruce Patton (P)2011 Simon & Schuster

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
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Performance

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
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Story

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
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  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

very good for the novice.

very good for someone trying enhance their negotiation skill. this book can be very technical, but repeating helps.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Great book

A very inspiring book which deserves to be read (or listened to) more then once. Surely woúd recommend to anyone.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Good

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

Was a fairly good book with good content but was very dry. I'm glad I listened to it but had to listen in 30 minute increments to not fall asleep.

Would you recommend Getting to Yes to your friends? Why or why not?

Yes - it has good content

Would you listen to another book narrated by Dennis Boutsikaris?

Not sure if the content made it boring or the narrator. It was dry.

Do you think Getting to Yes needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

No

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Wish everyone listened to this program...

Excellent program. Great approach to avoid both emotional negotiations, as well as how to appeal to mutual interests (not win-lose).

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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amazing!!

so much wisdom here! I recommend this book to everyone, especially those in sales. it will no doubt increase your skills in working with people.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Hayden
  • Wellington, New Zealand
  • 04-04-14

A refreshing take on the win-win problem

What did you love best about Getting to Yes?

The alternative options for getting to yes are excellent. They punctuate the theory with timely examples of how to actually use the concept in both big corporate and smaller at-home examples of negotiation situations.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Blythe
  • Alberta (formerly California)
  • 07-20-16

Excellent book about negotiation techniques

What was one of the most memorable moments of Getting to Yes?

The examples are clear and helpful in applying the techniques to real world situations

What’s an idea from the book that you will remember?

The difference between principled and positional negotiation can be summed up quite easily in an example the author gives: two people in a library, person A wants the window closed and person B wants the window open. Two positions that are pretty much irreconcilable if the two parties simply stand by their positions and refuse to budge; there seems no way to negotiate an answer that will satisfy both. However, if the librarian comes in and looks at their interests rather than their positions, she may learn that person A wants the window open because they want fresh air (maybe the dust is making them allergic) while person B wants the window closed because he didn't bring a jacket and will be cold in a draft. Now the librarian can offer several solutions that might resolve the disagreement - open a window further away from person B, turn up the heat, offer person A allergy medications, increase the cleaner's schedule for dusting, etc. Looking at the interests instead of the positions may turn up several ways to resolve the dispute to both people's satisfaction, none of which will be discovered if they insist on sticking to their principles and looking at the dispute in only that light.

Any additional comments?

This is a book about negotiation skills, and in particular what the author calls principled negotiation (considering the interests of both parties) as opposed to positional negotiation (taking positions). It's a very interesting book, clearly explaining the weakness of positional negotiation and how to change the discussion to a more productive examination of all parties' interests.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
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Great Narrator. Good foundation for Negotiation.

Would you consider the audio edition of Getting to Yes to be better than the print version?

I think this was a fantastic reading. The narrator really brought a lot to the book and read each example in a very interesting way to keep the context alive.

What about Dennis Boutsikaris’s performance did you like?

His proper British accent made you feel like what he was saying was smart and correct.

What’s an idea from the book that you will remember?

Separate the people from the problem was a key idea that I will always keep in mind for negotiating.

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Must read & re'read

Must read regardless if for business, workplace or personal matters. Re-read regularly or before any negotiations.

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Incredibly useful!

I am am attorney and I have to negotiate EVERYDAY. I have already used the principles in this book to get better outcomes for my clients. I recommend it to all of my colleagues and it is a must read if you're really interested in being the best negotiator you can be.