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Publisher's Summary

This audiobook provides evidence-based answers to the key questions asked by marketers every day. Tackling issues such as how brands grow, how advertising really works, what price promotions really do and how loyalty programs really affect loyalty, How Brands Grow presents decades of research in a style that is written for marketing professionals to grow their brands.

It is the first audiobook to present these laws in context and to explore their meaning and application. The most distinctive element to this audiobook is that the laws presented are tried and tested; they have been found to hold over varied conditions, time and countries. This is contrary to most marketing texts and indeed, much information provides evidence that much modern marketing theory is far from soundly based.

©2010 Byron Sharp (P)2014 Audible Inc.

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What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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    1 out of 5 stars
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Poorly conceived, badly written, and boringly delivered

A snake oil sales pitch delivered by the driest narration you can imagine. Filled with sweeping generalizations about "science" supported by "data" but never challenging, questioning its own assertions or looking at the multiple marketplace examples that contradict the assertions made. A great book to convince accountants they can be great marketers written by someone lacking any instinct or basic logic.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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Performance was Robotic

the performance kind of ruined this book for me. There Re a lot of interesting insights but I couldn't grasp them because I was being put to sleep by the reader.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Great content - robotic speaker

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

I found the content to be really interesting and thought provoking. Really made me rethink my approach to my business.

What did you like best about this story?

Confirmation that advertisers need to talk to all customers: loyals, switchers, competitive loyals and even non-category users!

Would you be willing to try another one of Daniel May’s performances?

No - his reading was awful. Actually sounded like a machine-voiced performance. The author should have done this - I saw his Ted talk and his voice was just fine.

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

N/A

Any additional comments?

Better packaging of the downloadable PDF when buying the book would have been smart. I had to hunt for it after I had already begun listening to the book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Painful

Quite painful to get through, very negative gloom and doom without actionable solution, big brand focused, no need to print charts mentioned

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Not your usual book on branding and positioning

A very contrarian approach to many commonly held views. Not ideal as an audio book, because it refers to a lot of charts and graphs, but the content is great.

Roman
Splento.com

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    1 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars

WARNING: "Empirical" Slight of Hand

Wow. This book is absolutely riddled with data slight of hand techniques. Take extreme caution before buying into any of these theories. I have spent almost 15 years working in a professional capacity with many of the brands cited within and have run well over a hundred research studies - and the author is incredibly manipulative with the way his conclusions are "empirically" drawn.

The pattern is as such:
1) Use data to force an extreme classification (e.g. classifying someone as "not loyal" to a brand if they deviate from it even once, instead of looking at, for instance, people that consume a brand consistently 90% of the time)

2) Make a sweeping suggestive claim about why (e.g. "this MIGHT be due to the fact that consumers see no difference between brands' positioning")

3) Translate #1 and #2 into a "Law" (e.g. "Thus, the Law of Inevitable Buyer Promiscuity")

...this pattern is repeated over and over.

Not only that, but he keeps oscillating between how the data is viewed and interpreted in order to force fit it into his theory, such as:

- Switching between percentages and means and comparing the two
- Comparing one statistic from a category to another analogous statistic from a completely different category (versus an 'apples to apples' comparison within a category)
- Subtly switching between an isolated data point (correlation) and a conclusion (causation), without there actually being an "empirical" link
- Reaching back to ancient datasets (if you look at the reference material, it toggles back and forth between the 1980's and mid-2000's) scraping for some numbers that can "empirically" fit his theories

It was infuriating to listen to as a professional who has seen the data AND the implications of proper research, insights, and brand strategy.

Again, definitely exercise a lot of caution in taking the suggestions within to heart. Not only does it marginalize and inaccurately portray the impact of branding and research, but the methodologies and strategies he discredits are only getting wildly more applicable with the micro-targeting abilities afforded to marketers through emerging online techniques.

Good luck.

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A Must “Listen” for Marketers

I️ just re-listened to this book. I️t is even better the second time. This should be mandatory reading for anyone who is in marketing or sales.

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Great content, boring reader

Every marketer should read this book. If you are considering it, read a physical copy. The narrator is brutal and you need the charts.

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    3 out of 5 stars

Good read with some outdated aspects

Great concepts worth revisiting how Marketing and Market Research are used.
One major flaw is distinguishing what it takes to build a brand in a new or non-existing category.

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    4 out of 5 stars

The narrator is criminal.

This has nothing to do with the work itself, but the narrator is horrendous. This shouldn't even be offered as an audio book. Your basic computer text to speech tool sounds more human like and fluid than this. Incredibly boring and uncomfortable to hear someone cut and stitch their voice together.

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  • stryder
  • 07-25-16

More for established corporates, terrible reading

Maybe it's the robotic reader but man this book is hard work. Not suitable for audiobook with so many references to diagrams etc. I don't even think the content is useful in 2016.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Unretired
  • 12-23-15

Good book very poor narration

Unfortunately the very "automaton" narration detracts considerably from this audio book. I think the underlying book is quite good but overall I cannot recommend this audio book.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Timothy
  • 01-22-18

very well considered book

this should be a must read for anyone working in the industry of building brands. The author uses data to dispell unhealthy myths and gives suggestions on what is actually needed to grow a brand.

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  • Richard O'Donnell
  • 11-06-17

most important marketing book ever written

finally a business book that provides real insights that have been tested and can be implemented straight away.

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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Ozzy
  • 08-11-17

Interesting but repetitive

The theories expressed are interesting even to a non-marketer, and are well explained.

In general it is extremely repetitive and makes the same points over and over just in different ways ... maybe an implementation of sharp's own marketing recommendations!

I'd probably just find a summary online and read that instead.

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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Gary
  • 06-22-17

Insightful content / robotic narration

Who might you have cast as narrator instead of Daniel May?

Byron Sharp

Any additional comments?

The awful narration of this book makes it a challenging listening experience. To make sense of some of the content, it is important to get a copy of the downloadable pdf as many charts are referenced throughout.

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Frederick
  • 06-26-16

Great audiobook for brand managers

Insightful and meaningful analysis of Marketing based on empirical data. Great narrator and comprehensive story which was easy to follow while driving.

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  • justina
  • 10-27-16

Great proposition, but perhaps not the best medium

This literature is probably best consumed as written word as the direct audio translation does not make for an easily digestible listen in many places.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 05-21-18

Eye opening

With everything we get thrown at in the marketing world Byron Sharpe’s book and meticulous research is like having a torch in the dark, allowing us to judge marketing ideas and campaigns in what truly matters and understanding why.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 08-29-17

Overly complex for an audio book

Information that's pre mobile and social media. Constant referrals to a printable PDF make this almost impossible to grasp as a stand-alone audiobook.

For me, I listen to books while commuting, so it wasn't for me. An updated, simplified version would be welcome

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Sami
  • 05-24-17

Delivers on its promise

Would you consider the audio edition of How Brands Grow to be better than the print version?

Cant comment, havent seen the print version

What did you like best about this story?

While the ideas proposed are considered controversial the story is good and gives you the ability to choose for yourself what you want to take in.

Any additional comments?

Download the pdf's before you start listening

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Mark Bolton
  • 03-11-17

Not a good book for commuting

I think this is a great book full of useful information but if you are not listening to it while having access to the downloadable pdf (eg driving) a lot of the content is not helpful.

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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Michael Petrovic
  • 02-15-17

Interesting perspective, too complex for audiobook

Would you try another book written by Byron Sharp or narrated by Daniel May?

As stated by another user, unfortunately this book is far too complex to be enjoyed as an audiobook. I listened to it at a slower speed and still struggled to comprehend some of the concepts. The PDF of exhibits is helpful, but it really isn't worth listening if you need to keep looking at them every 5 minutes.

Would you be willing to try another book from Byron Sharp? Why or why not?

Maybe... He has a few interesting ideas, many of which are very basic and explained in a complicated way to sound original. E.g. companies with more market share tend to have higher brand recognition = double jeopardy law.

What does Daniel May bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

He is great at reading the concepts in a clear way and is easy to listen to.

Any additional comments?

Buy the book, don't bother with the audio version.