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Publisher's Summary

Most of us know what it feels like to fall under the spell of food - when one slice of pizza turns into half a pie, or a handful of chips leads to an empty bag. But it's harder to understand why we can't seem to stop eating - even when we know better. When we want so badly to say "no," why do we continue to reach for food?

Dr. David Kessler, the dynamic former FDA commissioner who reinvented the food label and tackled the tobacco industry, now reveals how the food industry has hijacked the brains of millions of Americans. The result? America's number-one public health issue.

Dr. Kessler cracks the code of overeating by explaining how our bodies and minds are changed when we consume foods that contain sugar, fat, and salt. Food manufacturers create products by manipulating these ingredients to stimulate our appetites, setting in motion a cycle of desire and consumption that ends with a nation of overeaters. The End of Overeating explains for the first time why it is exceptionally difficult to resist certain foods and why it's so easy to overindulge. Dr. Kessler met with top scientists, physicians, and food industry insiders.

The End of Overeatinguncovers the shocking facts about how we lost control over our eating habits - and how we can get it back. Dr. Kessler presents groundbreaking research, along with what is sure to be a controversial view inside the industry that continues to feed a nation of overeaters - from popular brand manufacturers to advertisers, chain restaurants, and fast-food franchises. For the millions of people struggling with weight as well as for those of us who simply don't understand why we can't seem to stop eating our favorite foods, Dr. Kessler's cutting-edge investigation offers new insights and helpful tools to help us find a solution. There has never been a more thorough, compelling, or in-depth analysis of why we eat the way we do.

©2009 David A. Kessler, M.D.; (P)2009 Simon & Schuster, Inc.

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Average Customer Ratings

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  • George
  • SPRING, TX, United States
  • 03-03-13

The Real Truth About Why We are Getting Fat

Any additional comments?

Excellent Research. Gets to the bottom of why we are getting fat. Deserves 5 starts. It is not however, a quick weight loss plan. The book gives you a new way to start thinking about food. On this new path the weight loss will come.

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  • Jessica
  • Providence, UT, United States
  • 01-24-13

Makes Me Think Twice About Eating Out

If you want a reason to stop eating at chain restaurants, this is it! Well written, well read book about all the things restaurants do to make us eat more and come back. Whether you like it or not, it will change the way you view food.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Only good as a first read

This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

This may be informative if this is your first read into the topics of nutrition, obesity, and dietary habits. That being said I can save you hours of listening/reading right here: sugar, fat, and salt make you fat; food scientists work to manipulate those three to make food addictive; some "healthy" foods aren't healthy (like spinach dip); those that can't deal with the cravings have a psychological disorder.

What could David A. Kessler have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

He could've had Gary Taubes, Michael Pollan, William Davis, Mark Sisson, and/or Loren Cordain ghost write for him (in other words, check out those authors instead)

What does Blair Hardman bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Good narration if you're into that sort of thing.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

Disappointment. I've read much on the topics of diet and nutrition and this was lacking, though I admire the author's ability to fill so many pages with fluff and not real information (e.g. there's no need to go into page after page of detail on the fact that Chili's restaurant menu is not actually healthy - anyone that doesn't know nachos are bad for you won't be reading this book anyway)

Any additional comments?

I didn't finish the last hour of the book because it was a pretty big waste of time up to that point so maybe there's an answer or method to help at the end. That may increase my star rating by 1/2 or so but I'll likely never know.

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  • Signe
  • Buckner, MO, United States
  • 12-11-12

The Food Industry Is Out To Get You

Very fascinating stuff. I enjoyed listening to the Science behind making food at restaurants and convenience items (pre-made at stores) more appealing by layering on additional fat, salt, and sugar, their form of the Trinity, I guess. You're better off eating Grandma's cookie recipe than Sally Field's. Make your stuff at home and save yourself some moolah and pant sizes.

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  • Anthony M.
  • Saint Louis, MO, United States
  • 06-18-12

Could have been summed up in under an hour...

The author talks about how we got to the point where the food we eat is making us fat, but takes what seems like a really long time to get to the "end of overeating". An overall interesting book by the guy who gave us the nutrition labels we know and love, but a bit long-winded.

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Very informative

This book provided information that I believe deep down we already know but like to ignore. It also has the scientific background explaining why we act the way we do towards certain foods.

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  • Joy
  • Rochester, MN, United States
  • 05-27-12

Great info

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

This wasn't an exciting listen, but the information was very good, and nicely presented. If you are interested in what is driving the obesity epidemic, and the science behind overeating, this is a good read for you.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The End of Overeating?

The end was the best, when he wrapped everything up and talked about what to do with the information

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  • Teresa
  • New Canaan, CT, United States
  • 11-28-11

Great content, but I dislike narrator

This book has some very good content, well worth hearing and considering, but I find the narrator's voice to be grating and unpleasant to the point that it is unhappy work to listen to! For that reason, I wish I had not purchased it.

  • Overall

Extremely repetitive

I really wanted to like this book. The author really doesn't have that much to say, though. He talks about some studies on mice reacting to food in a way overeaters recognize (going through many obstacles to eat tasty things) then spends dozens of chapters complaining that the food industry designs food to be palatable. Unless you thought packaged foods were actually made by the Keebler elves, this isn't revelatory.

Save your time and your audible credit.

  • Overall

Really a fresh look at the subject

I reccomended it to patients whom it helped them to actually lose weight. Good especially for those with knowledge of evidence based science. Very well written, with a positive outlook.