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Publisher's Summary

Most of us know what it feels like to fall under the spell of food - when one slice of pizza turns into half a pie, or a handful of chips leads to an empty bag. But it's harder to understand why we can't seem to stop eating - even when we know better. When we want so badly to say "no," why do we continue to reach for food?

Dr. David Kessler, the dynamic former FDA commissioner who reinvented the food label and tackled the tobacco industry, now reveals how the food industry has hijacked the brains of millions of Americans. The result? America's number-one public health issue.

Dr. Kessler cracks the code of overeating by explaining how our bodies and minds are changed when we consume foods that contain sugar, fat, and salt. Food manufacturers create products by manipulating these ingredients to stimulate our appetites, setting in motion a cycle of desire and consumption that ends with a nation of overeaters. The End of Overeating explains for the first time why it is exceptionally difficult to resist certain foods and why it's so easy to overindulge. Dr. Kessler met with top scientists, physicians, and food industry insiders.

The End of Overeatinguncovers the shocking facts about how we lost control over our eating habits - and how we can get it back. Dr. Kessler presents groundbreaking research, along with what is sure to be a controversial view inside the industry that continues to feed a nation of overeaters - from popular brand manufacturers to advertisers, chain restaurants, and fast-food franchises. For the millions of people struggling with weight as well as for those of us who simply don't understand why we can't seem to stop eating our favorite foods, Dr. Kessler's cutting-edge investigation offers new insights and helpful tools to help us find a solution. There has never been a more thorough, compelling, or in-depth analysis of why we eat the way we do.

©2009 David A. Kessler, M.D.; (P)2009 Simon & Schuster, Inc.

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What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

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  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Technical but helpful

This book can be technical at times and repeats some of the core information however, if you want to really understand and create a plan to combat overeating, this is the book you need.

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  • Richard
  • Las Vegas, NV, United States
  • 02-23-16

Great take on overeating.

This was a good read. Took a while to get to the point, but had a great message in the end on what causes us to overeat and how to minimize the behavior.

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So great!!!

Loved it!!! It wasn't just about overeating, it's so informative about the food we eat, where it comes from, and how our minds work when we think about food. I will never think about food the same way.

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great information to learn

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I learn better by listening than reading. This book provided a lot of evidence and information that I don't think I would have been patient enough to read. Having someone read it to me was perfect. And in audio form, it is useful to be able to replay some of the suggestions for breaking bad habits and creating good ones. Important information about how we are being manipulated by food companies was presented -- and good coaching was provided on how to fight back.

What did you like best about this story?

What I liked about this non-fiction work was that the case was convincingly made about how and why we eat addictive foods that are layered with sugar, fat and salt -- and then strategies were presented as to how to we can arm ourselves against those luring messages.

Which character – as performed by Blair Hardman – was your favorite?

As a book of non-fiction, there was only a narrator.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

This book made me think about how we as a society overindulge, how I succumb, and encouraged the reader to rethink our behaviors and initiate change to more healthful behaviors. It made me angry at companies for exploiting us -- and angry at myself and society for being such ignorant and willing victims.

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Long winded...

The narration is great. The information is good. Too much time was focused on research findings and what this or that expert had to say to support the same handful of key points. These key points foscused on why we over eat. More time should have been spent on what to do about it.

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Really helpful book

I loved this educational and interesting book. I would highly recommend it to anyone who has a challenge with their weight.

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Very informative but very long

The book begins with an intriguing premise and it can be summed up in his basic thoughts and so on fat and sugar and salt on Sat but after you hear that a few times you want him to say something else and he doesn't after about the first two hours you've earned the entire book and you do not need to listen to the rest

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It's easy to see how America got fat!

Very interesting look at how culture, society, and business shape our eating habits. Contained a lot of clinical study detail. That might get boring for some, but the author tried to keep it in layman's terms. I followed it all well. Not so much a book about "what you need to do" but more about "why we do what we do" and practical suggestions about how we can help to re-teach ourselves successful eating behaviors.

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Amazing

Would you consider the audio edition of The End of Overeating to be better than the print version?

I listened to the audio version while driving to and from work, and now use the print edition for reference, so I'm not sure that one is necessarily better than the other - they each serve a separate purpose for me.

Which scene was your favorite?

I really appreciated all of the advice on how to change eating behavior. I think there were some useful tools presented, and that is definitely a section of the book that I will listen to again.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I looked forward to sitting in traffic so I could learn more, so yes, I would say that is true.

Any additional comments?

Don't listen to the book when you're hungry, especially in the chapters where he is describing restaurant food. I had to stop listening a few times when it was making me want sugar on fat on sugar on fat on salt on fat. Generally speaking though, the material was fascinating, and while some of it was obvious, I didn't realize that there was such a focused effort on manufacturing foods that would make me want more of them. I was a little naive about that - I actually thought most of the manufacturing and processing of foods was driven by cost (ingredients are cheaper) or improvements in technology. Or maybe it's really about ALL of that. At any rate, it was thought-provoking and has given me a better understanding of what ingredients may be doing for the flavor of food, and what they might be doing to my children and me.

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  • Story

Great info on learning and craving

Kessler offers excellent clear descriptions of how our minds work and how this relates to overeating. This includes how commercial foods are designed to induce cravings, to the brain's reward circuits, to breaking habits, and much more. Not only does Kessler offer useful advice on controlling overeating, he offers a very clear look at how to make and break habits in general. (Some of this is even helpful in my dog training, which is, after all, in large part about helping dogs make or break habits, like sitting nicely at the door when people arrive.)