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Publisher's Summary

Most of us know what it feels like to fall under the spell of food - when one slice of pizza turns into half a pie, or a handful of chips leads to an empty bag. But it's harder to understand why we can't seem to stop eating - even when we know better. When we want so badly to say "no," why do we continue to reach for food?

Dr. David Kessler, the dynamic former FDA commissioner who reinvented the food label and tackled the tobacco industry, now reveals how the food industry has hijacked the brains of millions of Americans. The result? America's number-one public health issue.

Dr. Kessler cracks the code of overeating by explaining how our bodies and minds are changed when we consume foods that contain sugar, fat, and salt. Food manufacturers create products by manipulating these ingredients to stimulate our appetites, setting in motion a cycle of desire and consumption that ends with a nation of overeaters. The End of Overeating explains for the first time why it is exceptionally difficult to resist certain foods and why it's so easy to overindulge. Dr. Kessler met with top scientists, physicians, and food industry insiders.

The End of Overeatinguncovers the shocking facts about how we lost control over our eating habits - and how we can get it back. Dr. Kessler presents groundbreaking research, along with what is sure to be a controversial view inside the industry that continues to feed a nation of overeaters - from popular brand manufacturers to advertisers, chain restaurants, and fast-food franchises. For the millions of people struggling with weight as well as for those of us who simply don't understand why we can't seem to stop eating our favorite foods, Dr. Kessler's cutting-edge investigation offers new insights and helpful tools to help us find a solution. There has never been a more thorough, compelling, or in-depth analysis of why we eat the way we do.

©2009 David A. Kessler, M.D. (P)2009 Simon & Schuster, Inc.

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  • 3.9 out of 5.0
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Not very insightful

Any additional comments?

I've read many similar books including mindless eating, good calories bad calories, in defense of food, jungle effect, fat chance, and rethinking thin. I put this book at the bottom for usefulness and also at the bottom for insight. I think most obese and formerly obese people already suspected that fat, sugar, and salt taste good. This book spends a lot of time demonizing the food industry for creating delicious food. Similar yet much better book is Mindless Eating. That book looks into how habits, not just the taste of food, lead to overeating. It gives suggestions such as the size of your plate mattering, keeping the candies 6 feet away from your desk vs next to it, waiting 20 minutes between refills, and using taller glasses rather than wide short ones. The studies for these recommendations are entertaining, clever, and scientifically sound. I've lost 20 percent of my body weight following many of the principles of Mindless Eating and now have the same BMI as Bob Harper (biggest loser trainer), and kept it for almost two years now. I was formerly obese for 15 years. I still eat fat and salt, but not much sugar. I have my life again, and have become the health guru at work. Good luck to all dieters.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

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  • steve
  • kearny, NJ, United States
  • 09-22-11

Will have to wait and see....

I liked this book a lot but I won't know how good it really is until I try to put some of the tips in it to use. If it helps me lose just a little weight, it will be worth it!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Ocassionally Insightful, but Mostly Dull

The author really could do a lot to make it more relevant to everyone. Instead of putting application at the end, he should have a bit of it at the end of each chapter.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Not a boring repeat of Omnivores Dilemma

Thought it would be a boring repeat of Omnivores Dilemma, but there is even more to our food industry that we must face. This is much better documented by a very knowledgeable scientist. (I'm glad the FDA just took a stand on regular antibiotics in feedlots, but the compromise taken is expected to initially raise antibiotic use based on European experience.)

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

gee thanks now put that tweekie down!

So great intellectual information and rational behind the book but it really doesn’t given you guidance on how not to overeat, just tells us why we do over eat.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

The end of over eating??

Due to the title of this book, my expectation was that I would get a better solution to the problem than what was offered in this book. I gave it two stars rather than one because a small portion of the book had some interesting info. But, if you are looking for a difinitive solution, look elsewhere!!

8 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

enlightening...

This book is worth the read, or listen as the case may be. The information is enlightening and makes sense once you hear it. The challenge is to make the appropriate changes once you have the information. Five stars is probably over rating this, but just slightly. I want people to know it is worthwhile.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Story

Opened my eyes!

This book has educated me on the big business of food companies and keeping us addicted. We need more awareness! This is killing Americans like every other addiction.

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Boring, nothing new here, waste of time.

This was terrible. The author spent way too much time on scientific studies, and getting too in depth with them, to only state what's already been said a million times over before. Nothing new, and therefore nothing helpful. Sad I wasted money on this one.

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Very informational

The majority of this is book is spent explaining how the clever combination of sugar, fat, and salt can make food almost irresistible. It isn't until the last few chapters that the author explains what we can do to combat it. These are good strategies, but I was hoping for a little more given I had to wait so long to hear them.