We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access .
Nudge Audiobook

Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness [Expanded Edition]

Regular Price:$20.72
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Publisher's Summary

Every day, we make decisions on topics ranging from personal investments to schools for our children to the meals we eat to the causes we champion. Unfortunately, we often choose poorly. The reason, the authors explain, is that, being human, we are all susceptible to various biases that can lead us to blunder.

Our mistakes make us poorer and less healthy; we often make bad decisions involving education, personal finance, health care, mortgages and credit cards, the family, and even the planet itself.

Thaler and Sunstein invite us to enter an alternative world, one that takes our humanness as a given. They show that by knowing how people think, we can design choice environments that make it easier for people to choose what is best for themselves, their families, and their society.

Using colorful examples from the most important aspects of life, Thaler and Sunstein demonstrate how thoughtful "choice architecture" can be established to nudge us in beneficial directions without restricting freedom of choice. Nudge offers a unique new take - from neither the left nor the right - on many hot-button issues, for individuals and governments alike. This is one of the most engaging and provocative audiobooks to come along in many years.

Included in this recording are a bonus chapter and a Postscript that was added in the paperback edition.

Download the accompanying reference guide.

©2009 Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sunstein; (P)2009 Gildan Media Corp

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.1 (1398 )
5 star
 (560)
4 star
 (524)
3 star
 (234)
2 star
 (57)
1 star
 (23)
Overall
4.1 (1047 )
5 star
 (435)
4 star
 (364)
3 star
 (182)
2 star
 (47)
1 star
 (19)
Story
4.2 (1047 )
5 star
 (477)
4 star
 (362)
3 star
 (163)
2 star
 (24)
1 star
 (21)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    mrieke 11-11-17
    mrieke 11-11-17
    HELPFUL VOTES
    9
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    69
    20
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Easy to understand and helpful"

    This book covers some of the material in "Thinking, Fast and Slow" but is easier to understand. BTW, Thaler, the author,
    is a Nnobel prize winner.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Doug Austin, TX 10-30-17
    Doug Austin, TX 10-30-17 Member Since 2016
    HELPFUL VOTES
    475
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    280
    55
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    26
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Libertarian Socialism"

    The author, Dr. Richard Thaler, won a Nobel Prize recently for his work, which is outlined in this book. He labeled his School of Thought as ‘Libertarian Paternalism’ in that his models for economic behavior protect choice, hence ‘libertarian,’ and that there’s a ‘father-knows-best’ attitude in protecting people from their own irrational selves, hence ‘paternalism.’ The big new idea here is that markets are irrational. Throughout most of the 20th Century, economists marveled at the successes of the free market and assigned these successes to individuals making rational choices in the marketplace, or ‘acting in their own best interest.’ This ‘self-interest’ was a loathed, but rational mechanism that, when spread over millions of private decisions, by millions of people, each acting prudently, an invisible hand crystallized to steer society in the best direction. Oddly, Dr. Thaler doesn’t dispute the superior overall results of a free market system, but he attempts to discredit it nonetheless.

    I believe Dr. Thaler discovered what we already know: human beings make poor long-term decisions in favor of instant gratification. In nearly all the book’s examples, human choices appeared flawed when the consequences of those choices were delayed in the future. The time component confused our decision-making. If a child chooses cake over an avocado & turkey sandwich, that decision is deemed ‘irrational.’ When faced with labyrinthine health care plans, where the services, quality and actual medical costs all occur in the future, people seemed to make ‘irrational’ choices. The overarching principle for ‘Nudge Theory’ is that if academics design better menus, then people can make better choices for long-term decisions.

    But I must say, Dr. Thaler hasn’t debunked the basic rationality of the free market. To this day, regular people make highly rational decisions in the marketplace when long term effects aren’t the only concern. If I want to buy a house, and there are two competing homes, one costs $200,000 and the other costs $220,000. If there is nothing to justify the extra $20,000 in the second home, then I’ll buy the first home. This Principle of Substitution lets me compare options and prices and allows me to act prudently and in my best interest. These basic value decisions occur constantly and drive the market. Whether I can afford the house or whether I bought it right before the housing market collapsed is where you’ll find Dr. Thaler shaking his head in academic frustration.

    One thing about Dr. Thaler that must be commended at all costs, is that he is a problem solver. Many books exalt themselves in their criticism of the world as it is, but here, the esteemed economist focuses his time and energy in providing measurable solutions. When I read, I want to hear solutions. Tell me how to make the world better. Whether or not Dr. Thaler is on the right track can and should be debated. But the fact that he’s out there, boldly presenting his ideas to the world is what counts. I like the idea of nudging for some investment security and I like the idea of nudging where safety is concerned. Beyond that, nudging serves the nudgee’s preconceived notions of ‘the good’ for the individual and for society.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Eric M. 10-23-17
    Eric M. 10-23-17 Member Since 2017
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    2
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Scratchy sounds last couple hours"

    The book was fine. A bit of a duplicate of some of Thinking, Fast and Slow, but overall good. My problem was with the product. I’ve never had a problem with any Audible.com book but this one kept scratching the last couple of hours as if it was on a cheap cd. Painful on the ears too at times.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Adam 10-21-17
    Adam 10-21-17
    HELPFUL VOTES
    2
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    83
    9
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Somewhat disappointed"

    Several of his suggestions were just not thought out and wrong. The us citizen spends over 7000 per capita and he cites the cost of medical malpractice as 36 billion. Author needs to be the ECON and he will see that is only about $11 per capita if med mal were totally eliminated. Author fails to look at the push pull between insurance companies, Doctors and patients. Authors assumption are unworthy of a Nobel laureate.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer 10-11-17 Member Since 2017
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A must read."

    A must read. Easy to be influential, and lessons learned will set the path for success - however you define success.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Christopher 09-16-17
    Christopher 09-16-17
    HELPFUL VOTES
    41
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    215
    16
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Tempting but perhaps flawed?"

    I've been looking forward to reading nudged for some time...I think since I heard of the British tax letters several years ago. Overall the book is very well done and they hypothesis set out clearly with detailed case study and even ample consideration of criticisms. I find the idea of libertarian paternalism very enticing and under most circumstances something I am fully behind. That said I felt the book glossed over a few key conditions that require libertarianism to precede paternalism for nudges to work. 1. In order to get the data on what works we have to also get the data on what doesn't. To get that we have to allow liberty first and after we see failed experiments provide educated nudges. 2. Similarly as above we mush always be vigilant against the appeal to super human nudgers. ThT is to say the humans deciding what and where to nudge are no better or brighter or less human than those they would nudges. Beware of their ambition to nudge.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Connie Estefan 07-22-17
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    2
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Not to be missed"

    Great book, a must for all of humans ;) I highly recommend this book and will happily read it again

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    hannah 07-17-17
    hannah 07-17-17 Member Since 2017
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    12
    6
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "interesting facts all around"

    i bought the book first but i was hard to read so i decided to listen to it instead.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    John M Chicago, IL 06-27-17
    John M Chicago, IL 06-27-17 Member Since 2015
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    4
    2
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Not what the title suggest"

    First quarter of the book has some interesting insights. The rest just seems to rehash the same ideas and pontificate on how we could improve society through concepts used in the book. These topics are largely out of our control.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer Cleveland, OH 06-14-17
    Amazon Customer Cleveland, OH 06-14-17 Member Since 2017
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    12
    10
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Anpther great Thaler bookm"

    Thaler does such a great job describing the idiosyncrasies of human behavior. great book!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
Sort by:
  • Oli
    1/17/17
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Very enjoyable and interesting"

    This is a great book, lots of great ideas and strategies. Aimed primarily I feel at policy makers nevertheless there are lots of tips for strategic thinking that individuals could build strategically into their own lives. Nice anecdotes and reference to ongoing web content and research.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Kirsty
    1/10/17
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "a good listen."

    This is a good listen but needs your focus as he covers lots in detail.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Conchuir
    5/18/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Reasonably interesting"

    I thought that overall this book was ok. In some cases a rehash of what's gone before, but a few interesting tidbits here and there.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Harbir
    3/6/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "wishful thinking"

    the book is about thinking positive and has no science behind it. its very wishy washy and i am suprised soo many people have goven this book positive reviews. it claims things like, ' newborn baby might be disabled because it was giving out a negative vibration'

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Mr
    5/23/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "1st half was excellent"

    A very thought provoking book. The 1st half has excellent. Some of the application of the theory was too detailed for me.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • E
    SOUTH CROYDON, United Kingdom
    10/5/13
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "great ideas"
    What did you like most about Nudge?

    simple and practical


    How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

    less about government and more about normal daily life and business


    Which character – as performed by Sean Pratt – was your favourite?

    not an applicable question


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    the budge about rumble strips to nudge drivers to slow down


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Ben
    London, United Kingdom
    4/9/13
    Overall
    "engaging and interesting"

    Didn't think I would enjoy or engage with an audio book with a potentially difficult subject matter..... however I was pleasantly surprised. Nudge is interesting, engaging to listen to and gives key examples of how you can implement the theory it discusses in practice. Recommend.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Mr. R. D. Cox
    London
    1/13/11
    Overall
    "Under rated by academics"

    Under rated by academics - overrated by Politicians

    This needs common sense combined with Ethics and Morals. i wish I had known about this stuff 4 years ago when I was working on default options

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank you.

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.