Regular price: $21.95

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

In the spirit of Alvin Tofflers' Future Shock, a social critique of our obsession with choice, and how it contributes to anxiety, dissatisfaction and regret.

Whether were buying a pair of jeans, ordering a cup of coffee, selecting a long-distance carrier, applying to college, choosing a doctor, or setting up a 401(k), everyday decisions - both big and small - have become increasingly complex due to the overwhelming abundance of choice with which we are presented.

We assume that more choice means better options and greater satisfaction. But beware of excessive choice: choice overload can make you question the decisions you make before you even make them, it can set you up for unrealistically high expectations, and it can make you blame yourself for any and all failures. In the long run, this can lead to decision-making paralysis, anxiety, and perpetual stress. And, in a culture that tells us that there is no excuse for falling short of perfection when your options are limitless, too much choice can lead to clinical depression.

In The Paradox of Choice, Barry Schwartz explains at what point choice - the hallmark of individual freedom and self-determination that we so cherish - becomes detrimental to our psychological and emotional well-being. In accessible, engaging, and anecdotal prose, Schwartz shows how the dramatic explosion in choice--from the mundane to the profound challenges of balancing career, family, and individual needs--has paradoxically become a problem instead of a solution. Schwartz also shows how our obsession with choice encourages us to seek that which makes us feel worse.

©2004 Barry Schwartz (P)2010 Audible, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.0 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    325
  • 4 Stars
    322
  • 3 Stars
    155
  • 2 Stars
    39
  • 1 Stars
    22

Performance

  • 3.9 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    258
  • 4 Stars
    228
  • 3 Stars
    138
  • 2 Stars
    48
  • 1 Stars
    29

Story

  • 4.0 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    275
  • 4 Stars
    237
  • 3 Stars
    135
  • 2 Stars
    39
  • 1 Stars
    12
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Not my Best Choice

1:15 to start on the myriad of ways contemporary affluent Americans are "forced" to choose.

Dodgy scientifically when he leaves the arena of "opinion". 93% of Americans are religious? Nope. 16% of Americans self describe as atheist/agnostic. Why fudge numbers like that?

Would have been an excellent op-Ed piece. And you can tell from the amount of filler just to make this into an acceptable book length

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Redundant.

This should have been an essay, not a book. Each point gets illustrated by a dozen different examples delivered in a lilting monotony. There are some good points made, which gets the second star.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Would read again

Really a very interesting addition to the collection of business psychology books that are out there. It analyzes choice and the number of choices and how they affect people and their moods and attitudes and happiness with those choices.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Changed my life really

I tend to be somewhat of a maximizer and this book helped me to realize the underlying problem I am facing. This is the first step to simplifying your life for being happier.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Изключително полезна информация и анализ на Избора

Представя изключително полезна информация за редица изследвания върху избора и как той влияе на живота ни

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

interesting but...

interesting and valuable information but it could be laid down in a dozen pages. the same stuff is repeated again and again.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Story is great, narrative not so much

I really enjoyed the book, but the narrative is a bit monotonic and disprovided of emphasis.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Thoughtful piece

A great choice, time well spent. It helpede to better understand the challenges that choice creates.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Blew my brains out

The single biggest thing you can do to improve the quality of your life is to improve the quality of your decisions. This is something that I knew going into reading this book but how true it was and how bad I was at it became shockingly clear. This is one of those few books that will literally change my life (in this case, by changing my process for making decisions and subsequently the amount of happiness I'm able to experience once I've made them)

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Interesting food for thought!

Would you listen to The Paradox of Choice again? Why?

I found the ideas presented in this book fascinating and exactly relevant to several situations I had recently faced. Hearing the psychology and social factors affecting our perceptions of choice and happiness really helped me put things in perspective. Many of the ideas may have seemed repetitive due to the subtle nuances between them, but I enjoyed the thought exercise of listening to this.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Paradox of Choice?

The distinction between choices and attitudes that delight and empower and the choices that detract from overall quality of life.

Which scene was your favorite?

There were plenty of examples, which I always like.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The idea that good enough was actually in many ways the optimal option!

Any additional comments?

Many people seem to have commented negatively about the narration style, but I found it just fine! Of course, there were a few odd pauses and pronunciations of certain words that I wouldn't have used, but such is life - overall, very clear and engaging.