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Power Moves

Lessons from Davos
Narrated by: Adam Grant
Length: 3 hrs and 3 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (13,321 ratings)

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Featuring interviews with Mary Barra (GM), Stewart Butterfield (Slack), Satya Nadella (Microsoft), Sheryl Sandberg (Facebook), Eric Schmidt (Google/Alphabet), David Solomon (Goldman Sachs), Ellen Stofan (NASA), and two dozen other leaders, thinkers, and luminaries at the World Economic Forum in Davos

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Our favorite moments from Power Moves

They don’t wait for an invite...they just write their own ticket.
A new wave of politicians have taken us by surprise
Power disinhibits us.
The CEO of Goldman Sachs talks about his “weird” hobby.
The CEO of Microsoft on the strangest thing about power.

  • Power Moves
  • They don’t wait for an invite...they just write their own ticket.
  • Power Moves
  • A new wave of politicians have taken us by surprise
  • Power Moves
  • Power disinhibits us.
  • Power Moves
  • The CEO of Goldman Sachs talks about his “weird” hobby.
  • Power Moves
  • The CEO of Microsoft on the strangest thing about power.
Adam Grant

About the Creator and Performer

Adam Grant has been recognized as one of the world's 10 most influential management thinkers and one of Fortune’s 40 under 40.

An organizational psychologist and the top-rated professor at The Wharton School of Business for seven straight years, he is the author of three New York Times bestselling books which have sold over a million copies and been translated into 35 languages.

Adam is the host of the Apple chart-topping TED podcast WorkLife. His TED talks on original thinkers and givers and takers have been viewed more than 16 million times, and his speaking and consulting clients include Google, the NBA, the Gates Foundation, and the World Economic Forum, where he has been honored as a Young Global Leader. He writes on work and psychology for The New York Times, serves on the Defense Innovation Board at the Pentagon, co-curates the Next Big Idea Club to identify new books worth reading, and shares insights in his monthly newsletter GRANTED. He received his BA from Harvard and his PhD from the University of Michigan. He is a former magician and Junior Olympic springboard diver.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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Disorganized

This book was all over the place and made no sense. Just a collection of short interviews that were not very good. This book is really a podcast.

131 of 152 people found this review helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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Not for me

There was little concrete in the book. Power is dealt with in an abstract manner, and there are scarcity of gripping points in reality. Much of the book deals with gender equality.

105 of 122 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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Glad I didn't pay for it

The author really seems like a young, fresh college graduate that threw himself into the realm of CEO's based off of a contact he had. He analyzes power as some sort of tangible good, that all these CEO's are focused on is gaining more power more than success of their companies or revenue. I got about 3 chapters in, the idea of setting this book up like a documentary with interviews is not a bad idea, but the way it was presented and the authors' views make it difficult to take seriously and learn from.

165 of 193 people found this review helpful

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Annoying

Everyone has a different taste of course, and this was not mine. I did finish the book, hoping it would become better, but these were 3 hours wasted that I won't get back.
Imo it takes a postmodernist approach to power, and if you're not a postmodernist / neo-Marxist / cultural Marxist, you won't agree with a lot of its rather one-sided view of power.

Plus, I found the narration gratingly annoying. Of course this also depends greatly on personal taste, so do check out the sample before you download, even though the book is free.

88 of 103 people found this review helpful

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Too ideological

The writer willingly ignores certain facts in order to push his ideological beliefs mostly centred around Feminism and "progressivism". He picks the facts that reinforce his ideology and ignores the ones that do not. As a result throughout most of the book he makes an error of mistaking cause and effect. This made me doubt his research and the overall usefulness of the book. (as an example, when he talks about men who are "takers"(assertive, dominant) he outright calls them psychopats and sociopaths, but in the next chapter he encourages the same behaviour in women stating that it is beneficial. The production quality is great and some of the guests are amazing, it's a shame the writer focused more on pushing his political agenda than writting a useful book.

154 of 181 people found this review helpful

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Not as described

This audiobook started off in the right direction. Shortly after turned political and hard to follow what the point is. Unable to return the audiobook though I have no intention to bother hearing any part of this again. I carefully read the descriptions of selections before purchase, and am disappointed.

81 of 95 people found this review helpful

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Lots of Implicit Bias

The monthly free books are good as the books are free.

This novel came off as extremely bias without much evidence to backup the largely stereotype style of delivery.

Had to turn it off halfway through as it never leveled out and came off as a smear campaign of anything the author didn't like. A bad version of 'Men are from Mars; Women are from Venus"

39 of 46 people found this review helpful

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Gets political.

Adam uses some of the most powerful people in the world's stories to advance his political agenda.

32 of 38 people found this review helpful

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Waste of Time

Not sure how this book got so many good reviews??? Makes me question all the rest. This book is terrible from the start, It is nothing more than interviews with various people of power while the writer tries to be witty and carry on a conversation with them. Multiple times the writer is making a case against several politicians clearly pushing his own political views while trying to do this on the sly so you won't notice. Also, there are several spots in the book where he is doing nothing but championing women, which in itself is fine. The information in this book while not all bad is pretty one-sided and does nothing from someone trying to better themselves. This book is masked by the title as something someone would buy on their journey to because a better, more powerful person in life and in the workplace. In my opinion don't waste your time.

8 of 9 people found this review helpful

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Started of interesting but went LEFT real fast.

Perhaps this is a consequence of picking up an audiobook at a discounted price, but what initially seemed like an interesting take on the aspect of power from people occupying powerful positions, quickly divulged into leftist propaganda. And finished off with a nice topping of Social Justice virtue signaling. Meh

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

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Profile Image for JC Niala
  • JC Niala
  • 01-19-19

Interesting interviews but spurious conclusions

Beautifully narrated with some interesting interviews, however many of the theories put forward are either re-hashed or drawn from work that has already been well critiqued. In giving an unbalanced view, there is precious little illumination of concerning statistics many are already aware of.