Power Moves

Lessons from Davos
4.5 out of 5 stars (2,436 ratings)

Regular price: $7.95

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About This Audible Original

Adam Grant, the New York Times best-selling author of Give and Take, Originals, and Option B, went to the World Economic Forum in Davos to find out what the world’s most visionary and influential leaders had to say about power—and its transformative role in our society.

What he learned there may surprise you.

Grant delivers a heady mix of captivating interviews, compelling data, and his unmistakably incisive and actionable analysis, to give us a crash course in power that both inspires and instructs from the front lines. In interviews with two dozen CEOs, start-up founders, top scientists, and thought leaders—including top executives at Google, GM, Slack, and Goldman Sachs, the CEO of the Gates Foundation, and NASA’s former chief scientist—he shares hard-earned insights on how to succeed in this new era of hyper-linked power. He also explores how power is reshaping everything from the workforce, to the rise of women in the office, to the influence of scientists on policy.

As pillars of traditional power are transformed by networks of informed citizens, the use of power is increasingly seen as a force for good in the world, from one that was once coveted to one that demands to be shared.

©2018 Adam Grant (P)2018 Audible Originals, LLC

Go Behind the Scenes with Adam Grant

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Featuring interviews with Mary Barra (GM), Stewart Butterfield (Slack), Satya Nadella (Microsoft), Sheryl Sandberg (Facebook), Eric Schmidt (Google/Alphabet), David Solomon (Goldman Sachs), Ellen Stofan (NASA), and two dozen other leaders, thinkers, and luminaries at the World Economic Forum in Davos

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Our favorite moments from Power Moves

They don’t wait for an invite...they just write their own ticket.
A new wave of politicians have taken us by surprise
Power disinhibits us.
The CEO of Goldman Sachs talks about his “weird” hobby.
The CEO of Microsoft on the strangest thing about power.

  • Power Moves
  • They don’t wait for an invite...they just write their own ticket.
  • Power Moves
  • A new wave of politicians have taken us by surprise
  • Power Moves
  • Power disinhibits us.
  • Power Moves
  • The CEO of Goldman Sachs talks about his “weird” hobby.
  • Power Moves
  • The CEO of Microsoft on the strangest thing about power.
Adam Grant

About the Creator and Performer

Adam Grant has been recognized as one of the world's 10 most influential management thinkers and one of Fortune’s 40 under 40.

An organizational psychologist and the top-rated professor at The Wharton School of Business for seven straight years, he is the author of three New York Times bestselling books which have sold over a million copies and been translated into 35 languages.

Adam is the host of the Apple chart-topping TED podcast WorkLife. His TED talks on original thinkers and givers and takers have been viewed more than 16 million times, and his speaking and consulting clients include Google, the NBA, the Gates Foundation, and the World Economic Forum, where he has been honored as a Young Global Leader. He writes on work and psychology for The New York Times, serves on the Defense Innovation Board at the Pentagon, co-curates the Next Big Idea Club to identify new books worth reading, and shares insights in his monthly newsletter GRANTED. He received his BA from Harvard and his PhD from the University of Michigan. He is a former magician and Junior Olympic springboard diver.

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  • Kingsley
  • Henely Brook, Australia
  • 01-04-19

Power doesn’t corrupt it reveals

'Power moves' is split into six chapters (plus an intro) looking at various aspects of the the use, transfer and management of power.

The chapters cover the following things
- Power reveals (what does power reveal about a person, and how does a type of person use power)
- Women in Power (how are women different, how does that help or hinder)
- team power (how to empower teams)
- Culture change (how to empower a culture change, and why)
- robot power (how technology can change things)
- Power to truth (cultural and institutional - how we protect those who can't protect themselves)

Each chapter ends with some "power tips" related to the chapter, giving the listener tools on how to make the most of the power they have, or to influence their work. There are tips for better interviews, getting promotions or pay rises, getting your team to work better, empowering others, changing culture etc. All fairly easy to implement, with hopefully significant ramifications.

Below are my big takeaways form each chapter.

There is the old saying "power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely", but here Adam Grant suggests that it doesn't corrupt, but it reveals what was there all along, hidden.

The section on 'power reveals' does look at politics a lot. it looks at many Presidents, analyzing their speeches against what sort of President they were. It looks at both Obama and Trump and how they use power. There is political discussion but it is mostly bipartisan, and there is no 'bashing' of one side or the other. There is analysis of inaugural speeches and of senatorial speeches and comparisons to the actions, to see how they words chosen correlate to the types of actions taken later, and about how effective they were at getting others on board with them.

It discussed how are women treated differently, due to gender. How opportunities may not come to them due to some unrealized biases. there is discussions on quotas too. One interesting point was about a study where people reviewed the actions of a person. When the study changed the females name to male name, and in a blind test, the reviewers responded better to the 'male' better.

Empowerment of teams is discussed as important - team will do something more than asked if empowered to do so. The tips included simple things like having inclusive conversations with those being affected, apologizing if you do make mistakes, and being approachable and human. Get feedback from the team and discuss why changes are made.

Culture change has to be forced. People like the status quo, even when the status quo actually sucks. It takes time of people being made uncomfortable for changes to take effect and take hold

Changes in productivity is needed, especially with an aging workforce and supporting more and more retirees.. Artificial intelligence will change things, but right now it's a black box that few understand. If we want to get the best out of technology and make people more productive, it needs to be more transparent. Emotional intelligence is also discussed in this section, as simple, technical tasks are replaced, but the creative, emotional jobs won't be (yet).

This comes back to politics again. while earlier it was a discussion of politicians, this is more about politics itself. How to get people to do something about climate change, or get vaccines out to everyone. How do we get people to trust the science. Are facts enough? Sadly, no. We need to look at how we deliver the message as well.

The audio is generally good. It is Adam Grant facilitating a series of interviews around each topic. He leads the section, explains who the experts are, and walks the listener through the topics and ideas.

Music and sound effects are used, but generally fairly minimally. Interview quality is good. There is one in the 'robot power' section that is mixed rather quiet, but otherwise it is good.

And most importantly, Grant does remind us that 'with great power comes great responsibility'. What more could you ask for?

125 of 148 people found this review helpful

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Too ideological

The writer willingly ignores certain facts in order to push his ideological beliefs mostly centred around Feminism and "progressivism". He picks the facts that reinforce his ideology and ignores the ones that do not. As a result throughout most of the book he makes an error of mistaking cause and effect. This made me doubt his research and the overall usefulness of the book. (as an example, when he talks about men who are "takers"(assertive, dominant) he outright calls them psychopats and sociopaths, but in the next chapter he encourages the same behaviour in women stating that it is beneficial. The production quality is great and some of the guests are amazing, it's a shame the writer focused more on pushing his political agenda than writting a useful book.

33 of 41 people found this review helpful

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there should be more interview books like this

I really loved that I got to hear everybody in his or her own voice. it gives a sense of authenticity and gets me straight to the source while keeping the audiobook lively and easy to listen.

13 of 16 people found this review helpful

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To leftist for an Independent.

I wasn't looking for a really politically biased book. Man-splaining? That's not educational speech, it's political.

9 of 11 people found this review helpful

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Good at first, but too political.

The book started out okay, but turned into an expose on inequality. The way to create more equality is not to force people to step back from power, that will never work, it is to write books that teach people to be good leaders regardless of sex or race.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

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Surprising Focus on Power Ethics

As a person with high interest in social science, I picked up this book expecting to hear a treatise on how to gain power in the office/government/social media and wield it for your own gain. What I got was a great look at how power acts on individuals who have it and how to use it - or think of how to use it - for ethical advancement of the wellbeing of everyone worldwide - especially those who don’t have it. Fabulous listen! I’ll definitely be going over it more than once to let it all sink in.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

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WORST LISTEN EVER

I have learned from every point of view in life. I had to stop this after the first two chapters because I was appalled. Overt sexism and obvious political bias. This is not about power but more about women in the workplace and why conservative thoughts are evil.

Now I know why it was free.

6 of 8 people found this review helpful

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podcast, not a book

Although interesting and well put together, this is a podcast and bot an audiobook. I did enjoy it, bit glad I didn't pay for it.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Finally!!!

So encouraged and feel so validated and appreciated as a woman by this book. This was stimulating, empowering, easy and fun, uplifting and cheerful to listen without seemingly any bias. I've almost finished it twice back to back already. Great narration. I can't tell you how refreshing it was to read something that seems to come from a place of kindness and consideration which is worthy of so much respect. Thank you!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Explanation complete

Extraordinary concise explanation of how the influencers will lead & who they will be. Well put together.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful