Regular price: $19.95

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Editorial Reviews

The most intriguing bit of contemporary technological history is easily the rise of Apple Computer, and so of course, the most fascinatingly controversial person in that history is CEO Steve Jobs. A company doesn’t grow so large so quickly without stepping on a few toes, making the story of Steve Jobs’ rise, fall, and return to power at Apple a hotly debated topic among industry geeks as well as ordinary consumers. Particularly with the publication of William L. Simon’s unauthorized best-selling biography, iCON Steve Jobs, which notoriously skewered Jobs as a cutthroat overachiever, the debate over whether the “Stevian” style of leadership is worth emulating has become increasingly polarized.

Jay Elliot, former Senior Vice President of Apple who was responsible for corporate operations and overall business planning, reported directly to Steve Jobs during the company’s original boom and its subsequent renaissance. He is therefore in a unique position to dig into the truth behind the mythic man, and does so with the gleefulness of someone who has long been “drinking the Kool-Aid” of how awesome the Apple working environment is. Steve Jobs’ management style and his legion of loyal customers have often been compared to a cult, and Elliot has firmly bought in. In many ways, the subtitle for this book ought to be “A Staunch Defense of Micro-Management”. From his understanding of Jobs’ nit-picky methods as “attention to details” to his dismissal of innovations made during Jobs’ temporary absence from Apple, Elliot’s positive spin never wavers.

At first, it seems surprising that William L. Simon co-wrote this book. As the listen progresses however, similarities between The Steve Jobs Way and iCON become clear. The anecdotal evidence is largely the same for both books, and the main distinction is that Simon previously used these stories to vilify Jobs, whereas Elliott and Simon’s joint effort here glorifies Jobs. When it’s merely a matter of tone that separates these two perspectives on the same history, the choice of narrator is particularly important.

Christopher Hurt is a very solid choice, as most of his voice work is in classics and nonfiction. What could have been a very shallow and sugary take becomes in Hurt’s audio a beguiling and ultimately fairly persuasive portrait of a misunderstood guru. Entrepreneurs looking for insight will enjoy a very sensible-sounding listen, while Apple devotees will still feel that Hurt is on their side. He is careful to keep both feet on the ground, even when the text itself seems to be veering into the territory of simply singing Jobs’ praises. The Steve Jobs Way successfully tips the scales back against the recent spate of Jobs-bashing, but it’s the way Christopher Hurt takes this Apple love-fest with a grain of salt that makes it a worthy listen. —Megan Volpert

Publisher's Summary

In iLeadership, Jay Elliot gives the listener the opportunity of seeing Steve Jobs as only his closest associates have ever seen him, and to learn what has made him - and the mystique of his management style - capable of creating tools so extraordinary that they have remade three industries and have transformed the way we create, consume, and communicate with each other.

Jay Elliot worked side by side with Steve as Senior Vice President of Apple and brings us his deep insider perspective of Steve's singular iLeadership style - which encompasses four major principles: product, talent, organization, and marketing.

Jay shares the lessons that come out of Steve's intuitive approach to show how the creative and technological brilliance of iLeadership can be utilized to drive breakthroughs in any organization, irrespective of size.

©2011 Jay Elliot and William L. Simon (P)2011 Audible, Inc.

Critic Reviews

“There have been so many books about Steve Jobs but none that have the vantage point of an insider like this one. The narrative is very engaging and I could not stop reading.... Jay has done a fantastic job to provide insights that we all can use from the man who has inspired two generations of entrepreneurs.” (Naeem Zafar, Lecturer, Entrepreneurship, University of California Berkeley, Haas School of Business)
"Steve Jobs is a revolutionary leader and thinker who has been written about by many people. But for the first time, in The Steve Jobs Way, Jay Elliot brings a deep, insider perspective of Steve Jobs' unique leadership style, which has forever changed our everyday lives and the world around us.” (Howard Behar, former president of Starbucks Coffee International and author of It's Not About the Coffee)
“Christopher Hurt gives an outstanding narration of this insider’s analysis of Steve Jobs’s one-of-a-kind leadership at Apple. Hurt’s casual gravitas is perfect for an analytic business biography; he’s superb at using his vocal tone and phrasing to emphasize crucial points.” (AudioFile)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    654
  • 4 Stars
    536
  • 3 Stars
    248
  • 2 Stars
    40
  • 1 Stars
    28

Performance

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    480
  • 4 Stars
    376
  • 3 Stars
    158
  • 2 Stars
    17
  • 1 Stars
    21

Story

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    473
  • 4 Stars
    362
  • 3 Stars
    153
  • 2 Stars
    37
  • 1 Stars
    17
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Entertaining as a biography, not as a book on leadership

I thought this book was a "handbook" about Steve's leadership style, designed for the reader to learn and implement strategies from. It's not. It's more like a biography, written by someone who clearly can't see the sun because of Steve's shadow. Which is fine - I am an admirer of Steve's, too - it all just sounds a little bit too much. It was entertaining and inspiring at times, though, so if you are a hardcore Steve fan, I'm sure you will enjoy it.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Great book !

Lots of real insider info about Steve Jobs and the great products and successful corporations he inspired !

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Fascinating & informative

Explains well the history of Steve Jobs, Apple and their rise to power. Perhaps also the potential decline in product quality since Steve's passing...

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Deja Vue

Same story about Steve Jobs and Apple. As I'm a big fun of Steve, I can read/listen/watch uninterrupted stories about his life, behavior and attitude to "cool" things.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Steve the person

Demystifying the man named Steve Jobs. The personal account gives refreshing insight into Steve, what he believed in and why he successfully created and run an inspiring company.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Inspiring and well written

Listened to this on the way to work and felt inspired everyday to love the details and follow my gut.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Inside view of Jobs's business strategies

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

If they care about Steve Jobs, yes. This is not a biography. If you are looking for a biography, look somewhere else. Additionally, the author stopped working with Steve Jobs in the 1980s, so most of the book is about Jobs's early career. The author admires Steve Jobs, but perhaps a bit too much. I am skeptical of whether the strategy Apple has used would be successful is most circumstances, but the author almost never has anything negative to say about Steve Jobs. This seemed a bit weird to me, as nobody is perfect. Anyway, this book provides a great view into how Jobs worked.<br/><br/>Also, the author thinks iPhones are better than androids. I beg to differ. Apple may have a more interesting co-founder, but their mobile OS is just not as good.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Andrew
  • FAIR OAKS, CA, United States
  • 10-08-14

It's Steve Job's Way

Any additional comments?

This is a book written by someone that worked for Jobs and had a lot of interaction with him as well as a lot of respect for him. You get to see a lot of insight into how Jobs operated, showing his attention to detail and enthusiasm for what he was doing. I think anyone that has made great advances in technology and ideas as Jobs did must operate in a similar fashion.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

A Tribute to A Great Visionary!

Would you consider the audio edition of The Steve Jobs Way to be better than the print version?

I did not read the print version but loved this audio!

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Steve Jobs Way?

Steve Jobs was an amazing visionary & inspiration for thinking out of the box & not being dissuaded by mediocre minds that were afraid to challenge the status quo.

What about Christopher Hurt’s performance did you like?

Mr Hurt's narration of particular situations were appropriately stressed in his voice intonations. At times, he made these subtly humorous & one could miss it if not paying close attention.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I was feeling very angry at the Board's decision to oust Jobs after having accomplished soooo much for Apple. Okay, so he was a bit brash, but so what? look at the results he accomplished! My heart broke for him but was laughing very hard at his comeback 10 years later! So who had the last laugh there?

Any additional comments?

A must-read for innovators & think-out-of-the-box types. Awesomely inspirational!

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Jonny
  • Liverpool, United Kingdom
  • 10-13-13

Good but forced

I enjoyed the book. Some great inspiration and an inside look at Apple and Jobs. However, the writer tended to crowbar in his achievements and thinking in a way that appeared too forced when I really just wanted to hear about Jobs.

Very much worth a listen though.