The Plant Paradox

The Hidden Dangers in "Healthy" Foods That Cause Disease and Weight Gain
Narrated by: Steven R. Gundry MD
Length: 10 hrs and 24 mins
4.7 out of 5 stars (707 ratings)

Audible Premium Plus

$14.95 a month

1 audiobook of your choice.
Stream or download thousands of included titles.
$14.95 a month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $30.79

Buy for $30.79

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

"I read this book...it worked. My autoimmune disease is gone, and I'm 37 pounds lighter in my pleather." (Kelly Clarkson)

Most of us have heard of gluten - a protein found in wheat that causes widespread inflammation in the body. Americans spend billions of dollars on gluten-free diets in an effort to protect their health. But what if we’ve been missing the root of the problem? In The Plant Paradox, renowned cardiologist Dr. Steven Gundry reveals that gluten is just one variety of a common, and highly toxic, plant-based protein called lectin. Lectins are found not only in grains like wheat but also in the “gluten-free” foods most of us commonly regard as healthy, including many fruits, vegetables, nuts, beans, and conventional dairy products. These proteins, which are found in the seeds, grains, skins, rinds, and leaves of plants, are designed by nature to protect them from predators (including humans). Once ingested, they incite a kind of chemical warfare in our bodies, causing inflammatory reactions that can lead to weight gain and serious health conditions.

At his waitlist-only clinics in California, Dr. Gundry has successfully treated tens of thousands of patients suffering from autoimmune disorders, diabetes, leaky gut syndrome, heart disease, and neurodegenerative diseases with a protocol that detoxes the cells, repairs the gut, and nourishes the body. Now, in The Plant Paradox, he shares this clinically proven program with listeners around the world.

The simple (and daunting) fact is, lectins are everywhere. Thankfully, Dr. Gundry offers simple hacks we easily can employ to avoid them, including:

  • Peel your veggies. Most of the lectins are contained in the skin and seeds of plants; simply peeling and de-seeding vegetables (like tomatoes and peppers) reduces their lectin content.
  • Shop for fruit in season. Fruit contain fewer lectins when ripe, so eating apples, berries, and other lectin-containing fruits at the peak of ripeness helps minimize your lectin consumption.
  • Swap your brown rice for white. Whole grains and seeds with hard outer coatings are designed by nature to cause digestive distress - and are full of lectins.

With a full list of lectin-containing foods and simple substitutes for each, a step-by-step detox and eating plan, and delicious lectin-free recipes, The Plant Paradox illuminates the hidden dangers lurking in your salad bowl - and shows you how to eat whole foods in a whole new way.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2017 Steven R. Gundry (P)2019 HarperAudio

More from the same

What listeners say about The Plant Paradox

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    580
  • 4 Stars
    71
  • 3 Stars
    21
  • 2 Stars
    13
  • 1 Stars
    22
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    495
  • 4 Stars
    71
  • 3 Stars
    17
  • 2 Stars
    5
  • 1 Stars
    12
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    486
  • 4 Stars
    69
  • 3 Stars
    19
  • 2 Stars
    10
  • 1 Stars
    16

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

The proliferation of fabricated “facts”

Reviewed in the United States on September 12, 2017 Format: Audible Audiobook It’s hard to turn on the TV these days without hearing about “fake news.” The proliferation of fabricated “facts” and ignored truths are a great menace to our society. As others have pointed out before, we’ve been living with fake news in consumer-level nutrition messaging for years. It doesn’t matter how many PhDs a person may have – standing in front of the nutrition bookshelf at the bookstore is a sure path to an overwhelming sense of confusion and uncertainty. Recently a new book has captured public attention, The Plant Paradox, by Steven Gundry, MD, focused on the surprising claim that lectins are the source of most, perhaps all human disease. It’s too time consuming to swat away every bit of nonsense that hits the popular media in nutrition, but we’ve been getting a lot of questions about this book and its premise, that lectins are the true culprit of our ills. Dr. Gundry writes on his website, “I believe I’ve discovered some unconventional truths about human nutrition.” Unconventional? Yes. Truths? Not so fast. The Plant Paradox is written by an author who reminds us of his distinguished career in medicine, including his experience in research. Dr. Gundry says, “with all modesty” that he has “found there is a common cause for most health problems” and further that “it is based on ample research, including [his] own papers, published in peer-reviewed medical journals, but that no one has put it all together before.” He goes on to say that so-called “health ‘experts’ have pointed to our laziness, our addiction to fast food” etc., but according to him, “sadly, they are wrong … [and that] … the real cause is so well hidden that you would never have noticed it.” This sounds like we’ve come across quite the amazing secret, just now uncovered by Dr. Gundry. So, he wants to educate us—but about what? The first hint comes from the book’s title, “The Plant Paradox.” A reader might think, “Aha, perhaps something is wrong with all that whole grain, vegetable nonsense after all! I like this. I knew that there was a reason why I never liked veggies and why I should, instead, be eating grass-fed meat! This book is for me!” So, what, specifically, is wrong with plants? According to this book, it’s not only about that awful gluten that we have heard so much about but about a whole class of “highly toxic, plant-based proteins called lectins” of which gluten is a member. He says that “lectins are found not only in grains like wheat but also in the ‘gluten-free’ foods like … many fruits, vegetables, nuts, beans and conventional dairy products,” which “many of us regard as healthy.” After consumption, they “incite a kind of chemical warfare in our bodies, causing inflammatory reactions that can lead to weight gain and serious health conditions.” On pages 68-70, Dr. Gundry offers an enormous list of ailments that have resolved in patients following his lectin-avoidance protocol, including a huge variety of autoimmune diseases, cancer, heart disease and some of its risk factors, weight problems, slow infant growth, mental health problems, and some neurological conditions like Parkinson’s, dementia, and “cramps, tingling, and numbness.” These would be earth-shattering findings, if true. It’s particularly alarming because these findings lie in opposition to well established observations about diet and health. For one, populations who have transitioned to rich, Western diets generally adopt a diet lower in lectins. A transition to a Western diet is characterized by more meat, more added fats and sugars, and fewer beans and whole grains[1]. One of the commonalities of the blue zones, areas of long-lived populations, is that they consume legumes[2] (and Americans, by and large, don’t). Consumption of beans has been shown to be beneficial for a wide range of diseases, including diabetes[3], heart disease[4], cancer[5], and in weight management[6][7] (Dr. Gundry allows vegetarians and vegans to eat beans, but only those that have gone through a pressure cooker, and yet research demonstrating the huge array of benefits of consuming beans does not require pressure cookers). Increased whole grain consumption, compared to low whole grain consumption, has been shown to be beneficial for a wide range of chronic disease as well, including early death and death from cardiovascular disease[8]. Earth shattering findings demand extraordinary scientific evidence. It would be nice to see some peer-reviewed science that supports his astounding claims, so we took a peek through the early part of the book to see what kind of references he offers. His first big claim (pg xv) is that his findings are published in peer-reviewed medical journals. His “peer-reviewed” medical publication cited is an abstract published in the journal supplement for a poster presentation. Making a poster to display at a conference is nice, but this is a world apart from publishing actual clinical trial results in a peer reviewed journal. In other words, there is no detailed publication of his methods, his subjects, his results, or his intervention as would be commonly expected in a normal publication. His glowing description of this abstract is misleading, to put it mildly. It gets worse from there. Many of his references do not offer any support for the statements he makes in the text or are misrepresented. Pg 4 – a reference to support a statement about egg yolks and shellfish “dramatically” reducing cholesterol shows that some types of shellfish led to lower cholesterol levels compared to consuming other animal proteins. There’s nothing about egg yolks in the study. Pg 21 – The longer you’ve been eating lectins, the longer you’ve been producing gut bacteria to inactivate them, so he says. This seems like a reasonable statement, and quite possibly true, but his supporting citation points a study that shows that a gluten free diet leads to less beneficial bacteria and more harmful bacteria. This supports a general contention that food determines gut bacteria, but nothing about lectins specifically. It’s also an odd choice to reference an article that shows that avoiding wheat, barley, and rye leads to more harmful bacteria for a book that is about to recommend that these grains be avoided. Pg 24 – “Some lectins disrupt transmissions between your cells…” He references a lengthy paper that offers a review of the workings of a large, complex part of the immune system. Interestingly, the body of the paper does not contain the word “lectin.” Pg 38 – “Lectin avoidance… as reported in the scientific literature has been found to cure autoimmune diseases” The reference is for another abstract from a conference, with no possibility of even getting the abstract online. This is “scientific literature”?! Pg 43 – Perhaps the most humorous of all the random references comes at the end of a long laundry list of seemingly definitive, alarming claims about what wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) does. There are no references for any claims until the end of this list, where he claims WGA “Contributes to the development of nephritis, or kidney inflammation.” There is a citation for a paper where researchers simply were documenting how some lectins stain kidney tissue. It has absolutely nothing to do with lectins causing nephritis or kidney inflammation. It’s as if the author did a search for the words “lectin” and “kidney” and just randomly picked a paper that popped up. Pg 73 – A claim about germ-free mice being shorter and smaller and living shorter lives points to a reference that shows that low-fiber (and presumably lower lectin) diets deplete the diversity of the microbiome over several generations. Not only is the reference not at all supportive of his claim, it actually suggests that if people follow his diet, they may do harm to themselves. And this is just a few example from the first couple chapters. What makes this particularly insulting is that this author is a highly credentialed biomedical professional. Surely, therefore, he knows what a reference should be, and what counts as robust “scientific literature.” How then can he reference his claims so poorly? This has got to be either willful negligence or astonishing incompetence. Even more egregious are the wild claims he makes with no referencing at all, which is most of the text. There are some rather random inaccuracies. Sometimes it almost seems like this author is just making things up that sound good. Pg 12 – “Nightshades are highly inflammatory.” Really? That kind of statement should have some evidence to back it up, because there is plenty of research that suggests, for example, that tomatoes are highly anti-inflammatory[9]. Pg 28 – “Up until 10,000 years ago, the average human stood about 6 feet tall.” Really? This appears to be patently false[10], with the average human (both men and women) probably being around 5’6”. Pg 31 – There’s a claim that Egyptian mummies died overweight, with clogged arteries and diabetes. And the author insinuates this to be from grains. Really? Is it possible that these mummified rulers lived like all the other kings and queens through all of time, eating not like the peasant commoner but the wealthy elite, mostly gorging on animal foods and available processed foods (added fats, added sugars) that were available at the time? Pg 33 – The author writes that 500 years ago explorers brought back from the “New World” foods that Europeans, Asians, or Africans had never seen, including grains and beans. What? This is just a bizarre claim. Do you know what Roman gladiators of 1800 years ago were called? “Barley Men” – because they were known to eat wheat, barley, and beans[11]. Pg 55 – Most of his stage 3 and stage 4 cancer patients got better. Wow. And not a single publication, or case study? The claims come fast and furious in this book, stated with a degree of certainty, without nuance, that undoubtedly appeals to many readers. But the referencing is so lacking and sloppy that Dr. Gundry should be embarrassed. The references that are cited in this book do a poor job of trying to justify its claims. And the bulk of the author’s wild claims lack references at all, with several examples of easily verifiable falsehoods. Because his claims are quite profound and novel, referencing of the findings of others and his own results are especially important. This is especially troubling for an author who touts his own research experience. Another method to determine the veracity of a popular nutrition book is to assess how well the author understands and discusses the success of the whole food, plant-based diets as documented in the (real, peer-reviewed) literature, given that this approach is, still today, the only diet ever shown to reverse atherosclerosis. On page 154 he mentions Drs. Ornish, Esselstyn and myself (T. Colin Campbell), saying that he’s seen our patients and though they lost weight, they failed to halt the progression of their coronary artery disease. Yet there are several papers in excellent journals demonstrating the success of Dr. Ornish and Esselstyn in halting and even reversing coronary artery disease. These are actual, full papers, by the way, not conference poster abstracts published in journal supplements. He says that the reason patients had weight loss success on these plans is because the physicians emphasize organic food (even though this is false and none of the protocols required people to consume organic foods) and eliminate certain fats (though he is soon going to be encouraging the reader to eat certain other fats). He makes note that this type of dietary approach is intolerable and that 50% of the patients in Esselstyn’s original study dropped out. This is another easily verifiable falsehood, indeed a dramatic falsehood. Of the 22 original cases in Esselstyn’s cohort, 5 dropped out in the first two years[12]. Did Dr. Gundry even read these papers? Or did he intentionally distort the results and suggest a false outcome from eating this type of nutrition for his own purpose? In a later follow-up publication (the kind that Dr. Gundry has never done with his lectin protocol) Esselstyn demonstrated virtual elimination of the recurrence of heart disease among 177 patients who had complied with his advice for the next 2-7 years—only one individual experienced a recurrence (<1%), compared with a recurrence rate of 62% among the 10.7% of patients who failed to follow his advice.[13] Lifetime observational studies with diets low in animal based protein also are impressively supportive of these findings. Dr. Gundry falsely claimed that we (and others) “once demonized all fat” but now have come to recognize that “all fat is not the same.” This is a very careless comment—I (T. Colin Campbell) never advocated a no-fat diet; nor am I a physician as he claims. I am an experimental researcher who investigated nutrition at its most fundamental level, namely, its biochemical and cellular underpinnings. That evidence and the principles derived therefrom were combined with human observational and intervention studies that helped to explain the more comprehensive relationship of diet and nutrition with disease occurrence. And finally, Dr. Gundry offers a very detailed list of “yes” and “no” foods based on whether they contain lectins, and several stages of dieting that a person must progress through. Grains, beans, and potatoes are to be avoided. Many vegetables (or fruits, botanically speaking) are to be avoided, including peppers and tomatoes and squashes. It is no wonder that this lectin theory is now a darling of the paleo, low carb, “primal” communities. Although Dr. Gundry makes some passing statements about the benefits of a plant-based diet, where are his patients getting their calories from? Can you get 1500 calories from Jerusalem artichokes and bok choy? We dare you to try. The approved foods list is a loaded list of hard to find, specialty kinds of food products, including only pasture-raised poultry and grass fed and grass finished beef, and specialty non-grain noodles, energy bars, etc…. His patients are either consuming lots of animals, dairy, and added fats or they are starving. To put it generously, it is fair to say that Dr. Gundry has not made a convincing argument that lectins as a class are hazardous. First, there are a very large number of lectins, second, they exhibit a variety of functions—some beneficial and some not and, third, these functions constantly vary, depending on nutritional conditions and bodily needs. There is even evidence that some may protect against cancer![14] It is extremely naïve to assume that one or a few lectins among this complex class reflect the activities of the entire class. Obviously, if there is any muster to Dr. Gundry’s claims, it should be put to the test, with well-controlled intervention studies, with their findings published in professional peer-reviewed journals. In conclusion, there are many people who desire good health and deserve good information and we resent that they must suffer such poor quality and confusing information under the assumption that it is good science. Is it possible that Dr. Gundry is just out to make a quick buck? He admits that his patients give up to a dozen vials of blood for testing every couple of months at his clinic. Overtesting is common practice in supplement-driven clinics. This extensive testing, (which are another topic), is almost always used to demonstrate some type of nutritional pathology, which of course can only be corrected by taking the suggested supplements. And of course, Dr. Gundry sells supplements, including “Lectin Shield” for about $80 a month. According to his website, “This groundbreaking new formula was created to offset the discomforting effects of lectins (proteins commonly found in plants that make them harder to digest). Lectin Shield works to protect your body from a pile-up of lectins and to promote full-body comfort.” This biggest shame is the resulting confusion among people who buy this story. Many readers will assume that seeing citations in the text automatically demonstrate scientific validity. The story of lectins and some of the evidence suggestive of harm in some cases will be enough for people to think that all beans, potatoes, and grains are to be avoided. There was a recipe for veggie and tofu stuffed peppers on our website recently and a follower responded that “Almost every ingredient is med-high in lectins you might as well eat a hamburger health wise.” What a shame that this type of unscientific nonsense creates so much unnecessary confusion, with deadly consequences. One could indeed have an interesting discussion about the health-effects of lectins, both good and bad, but this book does not provide it. Further, highly replicable and reliable scientific evidence now shows that a diet of whole plant-based foods, as part of a lifestyle of appropriate hydration, physical activity and outdoor activities maintains and restores health far more profoundly than our contemporary practices. We also know that this evidence challenges our existing system which is too much about commerce and too little about public health. To say that people are confused is an understatement and it is this confusion that invites scams like this book. Also, there are many who want to hear good things about their bad habits. We can only hope that this newly invented fad, based on such unethical and self-serving behavior, will pass quickly. 6,056 people found this helpful

57 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Claims without data

I am writing this review as a physician - scientist. This "expert" has supposedly performed extensive research, making various claims in the book, stating that he has published countless "peer reviewed" papers. Check in pubmed. There are 10 Gundry publications. NONE are diet-related. The latest is from 2004. (world expert in cardiac surgery??) Beware of any self - declared expert who talk about Jane and John Does who got better with his treatment. Where are the data? If he has the secret to good health, why does he not perform a randomized study and publish it? He apparently can cure Multiple Sclerosis patients who do not respond to routine care. Why not publish your cases for real peer review? I guess it is easier to have a website and sell expensive supplements instead based on the "science" This does not mean everything in this book is unreliable. For instance, the role of the gut flora in human disease is becoming clearer everyday. However, except a limited amount of strains, it is unclear which bacteria are helpful, which are deleterious at what quantities. Read/listen to this book. But also do your own research. Read other books. Ask questions. Check peer reviewed literature. Make your own call.

100 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Disappointed

I was hoping for an insightful book on health. After checking references and doing further research on the information that Dr. Gundry provides, I found out this book was a self-promoting means to further his celebrity.

19 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

pseudoscience

I don't trust this book, it is not backed by science. it may have good ideas. it may also have horrible ideas. we don't know.

14 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Need cliff notes for this one

Took too long to get to the point. Plan is good, but seems like it's too hard to follow

23 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Interesting but...

Plant Paradox explanation on how plants can help and also kill you made a lot of sense to me, but in my honest opinion it is way too much information. I was reading the book with some paranoia until we reach the end of it. I didn't like the end of the book, it seemed more like he was trying to sell me all the supplements he made (although you can buy them anywhere else ;-) ) he makes clear he uses the best components and bla bla bla... trying to make you go to his web site right away and buy everything he sells in order to avoid a tomato seed to kill you. In my opinion lost some credibility at the end, as I felt I was in a: "as seen on TV show". The information is good, and I'm pretty sure he has help a lot of people with their diseases, but for me was too much Apocalyptical.

25 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Life Changing Information!!!

This book is definitely a must read for anyone who cares about their health and longevity. All of the things that I knew about food for vitality are expressly written in a most “digestible” form. Thank you Dr. Gundry for your work! You are the BEST ONE!

6 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

MY MIND IS BLOWN!

The information the doctor share"s is invaluable. His intention to HEAL is delivered with care.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Leaky gut isn't a diagnosis-this is a diet book

I want to push back on the comments about lack of published research from other reviewers. Dr. Gundry is not citing his own published research, he clearly says he's citing others. And there is evidence to support his assertions individually, just not in a unified way. What this book, and presumably his others, has done is cobbled together several different studies that have no direct relation to one another and cannot, scientifically, be taken as a common theory. Many medical professionals working outside their domain knowledge make spurious correlations like this, trying to see a big picture that isn't there. Leaky gut isn't a recognized disorder, which means this book is a treatment for a diagnosis no one can give you. Why you lose weight is you are on a super restrictive diet. Why you feel better is you are eating organic foods and avoiding toxins--especially OTC drugs. There are numerous studies that show the harmful effects of Roundup and heavy NSAID use. And many, many studies that show cutting back on simple sugars reduces any number of bad health outcomes. This is not news. As for beans and squash being bad for you, these are stables of native Americans dating back to the Mayans. They aren't "new" to humans. These populations only became diabetic when they encountered sugar-rich European foods. Until then they were thin, healthy, robust people. As far as rice and other gluten-free grains (e.g. quinoa) being bad for you, one only need look as Asian and Aztec populations. It is speculation to suggest they are unhealthy in moderation. The big theory and the most weakly supported is the avoidance of many fruits and vegetables. Of course, eating local and farm fresh is best. But Dr. Gundry's research from his time at university on circadian food rhythm of eating certain foods at certain times seems flawed. He suggests one should eat fruit and vegetables year around suggesting our ancestors didn't. This overlooks that they dried it to be eaten at other times. So this assertion isn't supported scientifically or historically. Lectins stay in the gut and pass out harmlessly, unless you have a gut perforation. Most people don't. The cases he treats are people who come to him *with* gut problems. So they need a restrictive diet. Spoiler Alert: Don't eat nonorganic, RoundUp ready, GMO produce. Don't pop Ibuprofen like candy. Buy pasture raised meats and dairy and substitute fish as much as possible. Avoid sweets and gluten-free products. Eat in moderation. Why the diet works is mostly common sense.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Fo
  • 09-19-19

absolutely life changing

it will take a while to acclimate this process. but I hope we are all able to fund these lifestyles to benefit ourselves and sick ones.

4 people found this helpful

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for amazon-user
  • amazon-user
  • 07-28-19

little scientific proof and a good sales pitch

Although I knew the book has been widely debunked for its claims and lack of scientific evidence, I decided to give it a try. Most of the content which is actually scientifically proven is just repeating to death the same facts about animal protein etc. The main point of the book regarding lectins is based on no more than a theory...And of course the final chapter is dedicated to telling you all the miracle supplements the author is selling. I even tried the diet and as one can expect it has 0 positive effect

10 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Amazon Customer
  • Amazon Customer
  • 09-17-20

Mind blowing!

Chapter 4 is where it really gets interesting. It's a whodunit🌿 Everybody should be taught this.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 08-21-20

Exceptional

fantastic book. very informative and excellent narrator Dr Gundry. Thank you Dr Gundry for writing this book. loved it !

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 06-26-20

Amazing content

Really detailed and insightful content, this book had changed my diet forever. It includes really yummy recipes too

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Mr. N. Brand
  • Mr. N. Brand
  • 02-18-20

Insightful and practical advice from observation

Read by the author, allowing emphasis on important aspects, leads the listener to get a clear understanding. Really great book!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Jody Johnston
  • Jody Johnston
  • 01-30-20

Really enjoyed this

The science makes sense and although hard to follow in the modern world, the results of the diet give are well worth it in terms of your health!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Jason
  • Jason
  • 01-14-20

Fantastic information

Thoroughly enjoyed the valuable information contained in this book. will be recommending this to family and friends

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for greenreaper
  • greenreaper
  • 10-30-19

worth reading for your health

An insight to what you think is healthy but isn't. Thoroughly enjoyed listening to this and I gained some knowledge to the plant world

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Matt
  • Matt
  • 09-06-19

Great insights into plant defences and nutrition

I think the main premises of this book is that, believe it or not, plants don't like to be eaten (by insects or animals), and they have evolved many defence mechanisms. This book takes a look at those mechanisms particularly lectin chemicals, and based on this provides some suggestions on which plants are better to eat. I personally like that macadamias and coconut have evolved hard outer shells as protective mechanisms and as such don't appear to have lectins and other chemicals in them.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Serenity
  • Serenity
  • 07-18-19

Highly recommend, so easy to listen to

I have the Kindle version of this book & found it outstanding & life changing. Not to mention I lost 20 kilo too! This audio book narrated by Dr Gundry takes it to another level. I had previously bought the US Audible version of this back when the book was first released & even though I listened to it, it was hard to listen to, I did not like the narration at all! I am thoroughly enjoying Dr Gundry’s narration & know that I will be listening to it many more times! Thank you Dr Gundry for taking the time out of your busy schedule to record this

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 11-25-19

the final piece of the health puzzle

read it, practiced it health and energy through the roof. this is amazing information

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 11-24-19

Perfect company book with other informative reads

I bought this after reading “Lifespan” and “Super Human” and found it to be in perfect company. These three authors really tie the whole diet and lifestyle healthy living and increased life span world together. A great read but an even better read in company!

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for N.R.Woodhead
  • N.R.Woodhead
  • 10-04-19

Great insights on Lectins!

Great insights on Lectins - brought together the link between the body producing excess histamines and what causes it. Tip: put the play speed on 1.5 X.... you’re welcome.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for MK
  • MK
  • 09-10-19

life changing

I always considered myself a healthy person, and for the best part I wasn't too far off. but this book has propelled me to a new level of health and vitality. yes some of this book gets very deep and technical, but take in what you can before diving head and shoulders into the plant Paradox program. highly highly highly recommended!

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 08-29-19

Lots of food for thought and good overall message

Could be structured a little better, it's a little back and forth. Not entirely convinced about the arguments around limiting meat consumption to limit IGF and TMO - took that with a grain of salt. Main take away for me was to limit lechtins, well worth the read/listen.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Frances  Robertson
  • Frances Robertson
  • 09-22-20

Life-changing

Revolutionary empowerment to inform the living oioif a best life. i have bought copies for both my daughters. thankyou Dr Gundry.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 07-23-20

Dont waste your money

Appears to be a sales pitch for a diet plan with lots of broad sweeping statements and little in the way of evidence or reviews to back them up. Potentially it has just been misclassified as "Health & Personal Development" rather than Fiction.... Very disappointed

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 05-05-20

A master piece

After reading this book I found a food intolerance check online which used the ELISA method (FoodPrintTM) which tested 120 foods, Sure enough the foods he suggested in the book are the foods I'm intolerant to (nuts, seeds, beans, A1 milk),, Some that he also suggested I'm not intolerant to eg, tomatoes and aubergines, everyone will be different, but for me this was conclusive evidence that what Gundry is suggesting is the problem for many people worldwide. Through reading this book and making the changes in my life, I went from a healthy person to an extremely healthy person with absolutely no remaining health concerns, I'm looking younger and feeling healthier and thinking even clearer. Thank you Dr. Gundry.