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Publisher's Summary

One thousand years ago in the valley of Kashmir, a great Tantric master named Ksemaraja wrote his masterpiece: the Pratyabhijna-hrdaya, which means "The Essence of the Recognition Philosophy" - recognition, that is, of oneself as a direct expression of the universal divine Consciousness. Recognition also that this Consciousness is, in truth, all that exists, and that its five fundamental powers of awareness, enjoyment, willing, knowing, and acting are the sacred endowments of every sentient being.

The Pratyabhijna-hrdaya was a concise primer, written to introduce spiritual seekers to the Recognition philosophy in less formally philosophical, more approachable language. What Ksemaraja created turned out to be one of the world's great spiritual masterpieces, breathtaking in its brevity but stunning in its power. It came to be considered equivalent to scripture itself by later generations, because of its undeniable inspiration.

One of the most powerful and revelatory spiritual masterpieces of world history, the Pratyabhijna-hrdaya is one of the primary sources for the study and practice of nondual Tantrik Yoga, and it has never been accurately translated or fully explained until now. Christopher Wallis, author of Tantra Illuminated: The Philosophy, History, and Practice of a Timeless Tradition, expounds the subtleties of this spiritual and philosophical classic.

©2017 Christopher Wallis (P)2017 Christopher Wallis

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Like having tea with a friend

Listening to this book is somewhat like sitting with a friend and having tea one evening. The discussion gently migrates to the nature of being, and your friend pulls out a small glass prism from his jacket pocket. He holds it in front of you, and the light from the lamp shines past your shoulder through the prism onto the far wall. As the sun begins to set, you see your own image refracted in a broad spectrum of colors. The image starts to shift, and you witness scenes from your life experience unfolding in new hues. The images spring from deeper and deeper parts of your being, a reflection of your interior landscape.

Look, here’s what I thought when I was 10. And here is what happened last week. And here are all my relationships. And here is who I think I am.

Part of you would like this to stop - who wants to expose all this? Your most closely held secrets? Your deepest fears? Everything that has ever moved you. But it’s compelling, and you can’t look away - you no longer know what to think, you can only keep watching the light shift, revealing yet another intimate scene that you have revealed to no one else. Maybe all of who you are was not what you thought at all. Or maybe you knew this all along. (What was in that tea?) A slight ache in your chest that you usually ignore deepens and sharpens into a piercing icicle of insight.

You notice that the light no longer seems to be coming from the lamp but from somewhere under your ribcage, and it feels like a space is opening there. Your body tugs the images from the wall back through the prism and ultimately collapses them into your being. A kind of alchemy transmutes your innermost substance of self into something unnameable, something utterly beyond description. You catch your breath, unable to move but amazed at the increasing expansion you’re experiencing from the inside out, a movement against physics that encompasses the entirety of your being and beyond it to include the whole world.

In astonishment you look at your friend who regards you with a slight smile. He is no longer holding the prism.The softest light of dawn slips in through your window, and he glances outside. “I need to go now,” says your friend.

“No, wait!” you say. “You can’t leave yet. What happens now? What do I do with all this?”

Your friend chuckles softly and says, “Ask Life what it wants to do through you today.”

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Seeking for more can stop here...

Receive the WISDOM from which Buddhism and Hinduism grew... from which much of psychology is evolving toward...

From a longtime practitioner and amazingly clear Sanskrit scholar. HE reads it and you can feel much of his presence through is words.

Enjoy the Play of Consciousness with this audible book.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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What just happened?

The sweet aftertaste of experiencing something extraordinary has remained ever since I finished “The Recognition Sutras“ just a couple days ago.

I haven’t merely "read" another book, but instead, I have been on a journey, experiencing something which I have no words to describe.

I LOVE THIS BOOK, and it is the first book I have the desire to immediately listen to again. So far, I have not come across anything like it, so to simply call it a “book“ feels like an understatement.

I don’t have any background in tantric philosophy, but Christopher’s way of writing made it so smooth and easy for me to understand. He seems to sense exactly what happens in a reader’s head and answers questions in the very moment they arise. Very comfortable to listen to, perfect pace, beautiful sanskrit sutras and even singing parts.

I feel fortunate to have discovered this treasure, and I highly recommend this masterpiece to anybody interested in the truth of existence.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful