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Publisher's Summary

As the Millennial generation (those born between 1982 and 2000) rapidly enters the workforce, their introduction into the workplace has been anything but seamless. In fact, you might have already heard one of these jaw-dropping stories: the mother who called HR to complain when her daughter got a mediocre performance review. The recent college graduate who dialed the CEO directly to tell him what the company could be doing better. The young employee who revealed a new product launch on her Facebook page before it was announced to the public. As unbelievable as these scenarios seem, they are happening in workplaces around the world every day. In The M-Factor, Baby Boomer Lynne C. Lancaster and Generation Xer David Stillman identify the seven trends essential to understanding this new generation: The Parents, Entitlement, Meaning, Great Expectations, The Need for Speed, Social Networking, and Collaboration.

Both humorous and savvy, this book - the ultimate guide to Millennials in the workplace - offers valuable insight and practical, actionable tips and solutions. Traditionalists, Boomers, Gen Xers, and even Millennials themselves can use The M-Factor to bridge generational gaps, be more productive, and achieve organizational success like never before.

©2010 Lynne M. Lancaster and David Stillman (P)2010 Tantor

Critic Reviews

"The M-Factor teaches readers the most important lesson they’ll need for the workplace of tomorrow: how to turn the Millennials’ great expectations into even greater results." (Brian A. Gallagher, president and chief executive officer, United Way Worldwide)

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  • Story

Talking to both sides of the generation gap

Differences between Gen Y and older generations can cause frustration at work. While stereotypes don't apply to everyone, there is some obvious general truth to the current generation gap, and this book does a decent job of offering some explanations and potential solutions. The explanations are based on differences in childhood experiences, and the solutions are based on accepting the resulting discrepancies in behavior.

"the M-factor" makes a special effort to see things from the side of the Millennials instead of just bashing them. This is useful for trying to figure out how to get along and better advice than I've seen elsewhere that just says to treat Gen Y like overgrown children.

The lessons are mainly in the form of stories about misunderstandings, revealing both views of what happened, with eventual happy endings.

One particularly interesting fable was about parents who moan about the #@$%& Millennials at work while encouraging in their own children the exact traits that drive them crazy in their co-workers.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Pauline
  • Colorado Springs, CO, United States
  • 08-17-10

I'm sure this was well researched

However, it came across to me as a book that condescendingly implies that we should all accept the Millennial Generation's self-assessed superiority over the poor souls who were born, grew up and went to work, hard, before they made their appearance on scene. Earlier generations should be happy to mentor these self-esteemed new employees into performing their jobs because they would be so much better at it.

If you really MUST experience working with millennial gen newcomers...hey, just look around your office and discover the joy first hand. It's liable to leave a bigger impression on you.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Roy
  • Beaumont, TX, United States
  • 06-02-10

Better Understand Employees Born 1982-2000

Wether you are working with Millenials or just want to understand the latest generation, Lancaster and Stillman will show the way to adapt. Based upon their extensive research they approach seven factors and trends that distinguishes this generation from others preceeding. Essentially, Mellenials are different because the actions of their parents, what appears to be a feeling of entitlement, a craving for meaning in their lives and work, high expectations, the need for speed, social networking, and collaboration. Much of who they are has been formed or influenced by technology.
Lancaster and Stillman expand on each of these factors and trends. They illustrate each one and how Millenials may improve their job success and how "older bosses" can adapt and use them to advantage.

This is a very informative little book. Well written and well organized, it is expertly read by susan Ericksen. Give it a try.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Well researched, written & narrated

I was very impressed with this book. I have watched several tv programs about the "entitled Millenials" and was interested to find that this book does a great job of explaining the different points of view, how to work with and relate to the younger generation, as well as understand thier actions and where they're coming from. It would be very helpful to anyone who works with those born 1982 - 2000, or is trying to understand "what's up with kids these days".
I'm not normally one to read "how-to" books, but found this book captivating!

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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the best in generational hiring uniqueness yet

anybody involved in hiring or workplace development needs to read this book! very thorough and very captivating!