Starstruck? The 50 Greatest Celebrity Memoirs of All Time Are Here

Love listening to the real-life stories of famous people? Here's our list of the best of the best celebrity memoir audiobooks.

To save the entire list to your library Collections for reference anytime, click here.

No genre is as natural for listening as the memoir. When you think about it, every day we listen to other peoples’ lives. Why not take it up a notch and listen to the stories of people who inspire us, intrigue us, and entertain us?

Speaking of entertainment, there is no greater listening experience than a memoir performed by the celebrity behind the title. Their charisma and authenticity greatly enhance the experience, making it all the more engaging. In fact, many listeners who would never think to read a celebrity memoir in print gravitate to the genre in audio. There’s something intimate and magical about hearing, in their own voice, the nitty-gritty of a star’s path through the highs and lows of fame.

Maybe “nitty-gritty” isn’t the most elegant way to refer to what the goal of the memoirist sets out to write about, which is simply their truth. It’s not so easy for many, which makes the experience of writing a memoir so cathartic. But the fear must be faced, as I learned firsthand when I wrote my own, an experience that deepened my admiration of the form. There was no room for sidestepping—I had to face the words. The truth is the necessary ingredient in any memoir worth its salt.

The best celebrity memoir audiobooks are in a league of their own. This competitive genre continues to evolve and innovate as more stars discover the power of audio, often blending memoir with comedy, self-development, social critique, and exclusive performances. They just keep getting better, so many of the titles on this list are relatively recent, though you’ll also find classic gems that have stood the test of time. The star-studded list of celebrity memoirs below will not disappoint as the real stories of your favorite celebrities are revealed in their own words and voices.

Save the entire list to your library Collections for reference anytime.

Matthew McConaughey culled this memoir from his journals that are packed with failures, joys, and sorrows. The title “Greenlights” comes from his belief that when you know how to take on and deal with life’s challenges, you’ll catch greenlights, a state of success.

Matthew McConaughey culled this memoir from his journals that are packed with failures, joys, and sorrows. The title “Greenlights” comes from his belief that when you know how to take on and deal with life’s challenges, you’ll catch greenlights, a state of success.

She had us with her first memoir, We’re Going to Need More Wine. Now, Gabrielle Union propels us onto higher ground and sweeter victories such as the birth of her baby girl, Kaavia James. Family is everything—she gives hers her all.

A vivid personal memoir and breathtaking exclusive performances blend beautifully as famed cellist Yo-Yo Ma shares his remarkable journey. Beyond music, he explains his belief that if we can strip away preconceptions, we can find better meaning and purpose in our lives—something he continues to explore.

Ras Baraka’s story is like no other. A child of Newark and the poet Amiri Baraka, his journey continued to Howard University, where he was radicalized by profound Black scholarship, to poetry and hip-hop, to success as a school principal and as the deeply respected mayor of Newark. Co-written by Jelani Cobb, this rich personal history offers a unique soundscape befitting of an outstanding figure and his journey.

The former First Lady shares her life with great warmth and truth in one of the best-selling audiobooks of all time. Michelle Obama leads us through her modest upbringing in the South Side of Chicago to the majestic rooms where she lived at the White House, making listeners feel like First Friends.

The late Anthony Bourdain forever changed the way we think about food and restaurants with the release of his blockbuster memoir. There’s no need to be a foodie to enjoy this legendary raconteur and renaissance man of dining and worldly travels.

Go on a hilarious romp with Carrie Fisher’s collection of tales from the famous film set of Star Wars, during which time she was seriously crushing on Harrison Ford. Her legendary candor rules.

Cicely Tyson was an exemplar of a life well-traveled. Her stellar performances were actually roads paved with opportunities for others. Performed by the author with Viola Davis and Robin Miles, her memoir reveals a true history maker who made her mark beautifully.

This story-behind-the-story of two brothers—iconic actors Ron and Clint Howard—and their Hollywood careers is about an American family. They had the love and support it took to make it in a tough town, and come out winners.

Seth Rogen’s sense of humor is like a tickle that goes on and on. This essay collection is full of comedic timing that hits the mark every time, whether Rogen is dishing details from film sets and stand-up stages or profiling his beloved Jewish grandparents. Cameos from famous friends make the audio a special experience.

She had us with her first memoir, We’re Going to Need More Wine. Now, Gabrielle Union propels us onto higher ground and sweeter victories such as the birth of her baby girl, Kaavia James. Family is everything—she gives hers her all.

A vivid personal memoir and breathtaking exclusive performances blend beautifully as famed cellist Yo-Yo Ma shares his remarkable journey. Beyond music, he explains his belief that if we can strip away preconceptions, we can find better meaning and purpose in our lives—something he continues to explore.

Ras Baraka’s story is like no other. A child of Newark and the poet Amiri Baraka, his journey continued to Howard University, where he was radicalized by profound Black scholarship, to poetry and hip-hop, to success as a school principal and as the deeply respected mayor of Newark. Co-written by Jelani Cobb, this rich personal history offers a unique soundscape befitting of an outstanding figure and his journey.

The former First Lady shares her life with great warmth and truth in one of the best-selling audiobooks of all time. Michelle Obama leads us through her modest upbringing in the South Side of Chicago to the majestic rooms where she lived at the White House, making listeners feel like First Friends.

The late Anthony Bourdain forever changed the way we think about food and restaurants with the release of his blockbuster memoir. There’s no need to be a foodie to enjoy this legendary raconteur and renaissance man of dining and worldly travels.

Go on a hilarious romp with Carrie Fisher’s collection of tales from the famous film set of Star Wars, during which time she was seriously crushing on Harrison Ford. Her legendary candor rules.

Cicely Tyson was an exemplar of a life well-traveled. Her stellar performances were actually roads paved with opportunities for others. Performed by the author with Viola Davis and Robin Miles, her memoir reveals a true history maker who made her mark beautifully.

This story-behind-the-story of two brothers—iconic actors Ron and Clint Howard—and their Hollywood careers is about an American family. They had the love and support it took to make it in a tough town, and come out winners.

Seth Rogen’s sense of humor is like a tickle that goes on and on. This essay collection is full of comedic timing that hits the mark every time, whether Rogen is dishing details from film sets and stand-up stages or profiling his beloved Jewish grandparents. Cameos from famous friends make the audio a special experience.

Danny Trejo unlocks the man behind the familiar face we’ve seen so many times losing a battle. In this brutally honest yet entertaining memoir, he comes clean about his time spent in prison, struggle with drugs, and troubles in his own family. The fact that he’s lived to tell his story is incredible, and that he’s sharing it is a privilege.

Danny Trejo unlocks the man behind the familiar face we’ve seen so many times losing a battle. In this brutally honest yet entertaining memoir, he comes clean about his time spent in prison, struggle with drugs, and troubles in his own family. The fact that he’s lived to tell his story is incredible, and that he’s sharing it is a privilege.

You know Alan Cumming from stage and screen, but his is a personal story about a boy and his distant and angry father. From his bleak upbringing in Scotland to his colorful Hollywood life, Cumming's lyrical brogue takes us through it all. The memoir has an epic twist when, as Cumming was writing it, a chance TV opportunity comes up to teach him about his lineage, with deep ramifications for his life.

Empire and Hidden Figures star Taraji P. Henson keeps it real, telling it like it is at every turn with a great sense of humor and brutal honesty when necessary. Her determination is impressive; she had a plan, and obviously it was a very good one.

Like the man himself, actor and activist Sidney Poitier’s powerful memoir pulses with purpose and integrity. From a childhood on a small Bahamian island to the stellar acting career that broke barriers, Poitier takes listeners on his selfless journey. His recent death leaves a void; a true gentleman has left the room.

It’s hard to believe that this memoir came out in 2016; the now-legendary audiobook continues to have an allure and freshness as if it were just released. Daily Show host Trevor Noah knows his way around comedy, delivering a savvy humorous take on everything—even apartheid's painful truths.

Mindy Kaling has the gift of turning what could dash a person’s hopes and dreams into laughter and joy. In this clever collection of essays, she obliterates the silliness of Hollywood’s vision of an ideal woman, hence the title of this empowering memoir.

Kate Mulgrew was born with teeth; fearing she would swallow them, her parents had them removed. That was just the beginning of an amazing life filled with passion and success (Star Trek, Orange Is the New Black, and more), haunted by a longing to find the daughter she gave up for adoption.

Known for his star turn on The Big Bang Theory as Raj, Kunal Nayyar will crack you up with humorous takes on life, such as thinking his first kiss was a sacred commitment. The New Delhi-born actor is a comedic force with a big heart that he shares generously.

Award winning actor Mary Louise Parker did what many women would like to do: sit down and write letters giving past loves a piece of her mind. Instead, in this unique memoir of letters to men—some she knows, some chance acquaintances, and some who don’t even exist–Parker credits them for helping her become the woman she is.

TV’s most influential creator once had a long list of fears, including public speaking and acting; no matter who was asking, Shonda Rhimes’s answer was always the same: “No.” Then she decided to try another word, the only word that would help her overcome her fears: “Yes.” She tried that for one year, and the outcome was life-altering, and victorious.

You know Alan Cumming from stage and screen, but his is a personal story about a boy and his distant and angry father. From his bleak upbringing in Scotland to his colorful Hollywood life, Cumming's lyrical brogue takes us through it all. The memoir has an epic twist when, as Cumming was writing it, a chance TV opportunity comes up to teach him about his lineage, with deep ramifications for his life.

Empire and Hidden Figures star Taraji P. Henson keeps it real, telling it like it is at every turn with a great sense of humor and brutal honesty when necessary. Her determination is impressive; she had a plan, and obviously it was a very good one.

Like the man himself, actor and activist Sidney Poitier’s powerful memoir pulses with purpose and integrity. From a childhood on a small Bahamian island to the stellar acting career that broke barriers, Poitier takes listeners on his selfless journey. His recent death leaves a void; a true gentleman has left the room.

It’s hard to believe that this memoir came out in 2016; the now-legendary audiobook continues to have an allure and freshness as if it were just released. Daily Show host Trevor Noah knows his way around comedy, delivering a savvy humorous take on everything—even apartheid's painful truths.

Mindy Kaling has the gift of turning what could dash a person’s hopes and dreams into laughter and joy. In this clever collection of essays, she obliterates the silliness of Hollywood’s vision of an ideal woman, hence the title of this empowering memoir.

Kate Mulgrew was born with teeth; fearing she would swallow them, her parents had them removed. That was just the beginning of an amazing life filled with passion and success (Star Trek, Orange Is the New Black, and more), haunted by a longing to find the daughter she gave up for adoption.

Known for his star turn on The Big Bang Theory as Raj, Kunal Nayyar will crack you up with humorous takes on life, such as thinking his first kiss was a sacred commitment. The New Delhi-born actor is a comedic force with a big heart that he shares generously.

Award winning actor Mary Louise Parker did what many women would like to do: sit down and write letters giving past loves a piece of her mind. Instead, in this unique memoir of letters to men—some she knows, some chance acquaintances, and some who don’t even exist–Parker credits them for helping her become the woman she is.

TV’s most influential creator once had a long list of fears, including public speaking and acting; no matter who was asking, Shonda Rhimes’s answer was always the same: “No.” Then she decided to try another word, the only word that would help her overcome her fears: “Yes.” She tried that for one year, and the outcome was life-altering, and victorious.

The world took notice of Janis Ian in 1966 with her controversial hit “Society’s Child,” a song about an interracial romance that spoke to many. “At Seventeen” followed and also troubles that forced her to take a break. Ian is back in all her glory as she enters into her fifth decade and shares new songs in this memoir of a timeless creator.

The world took notice of Janis Ian in 1966 with her controversial hit “Society’s Child,” a song about an interracial romance that spoke to many. “At Seventeen” followed and also troubles that forced her to take a break. Ian is back in all her glory as she enters into her fifth decade and shares new songs in this memoir of a timeless creator.

Carsick, the true story of John Waters’s cross-country hitchhiking journey, will have listeners on the edges of their seats from Baltimore to San Francisco. It’s hard to believe the film director of cult classics Hairspray and Cry-Baby would go "undercover" as an average guy hitching rides, but Waters’s theatrical narration and enthusiasm are contagious, leaving listeners craving an equally spontaneous adventure.

Rolling Stones legend Keith Richards takes us on his own private tour of a life that rocked and rolled, and not always with the punches. There are the women and the debauchery, and then there’s the music. Richards pulled it together to write some huge hits. He speaks his truth in this dizzyingly honest memoir.

There’s a lot of taste in this memoir, and it’s not all on plates. Red Rooster and Aquavit chef Marcus Samuelsson gives us an inside look of his life from Ethiopia to Sweden, from lessons learned in his grandmother’s kitchen to becoming a chef in three-star restaurants. His life is a marvelous clash of spices and cultures.

If you’re in the mood to wallow in great wit and observations that, with all their absurdity, ring true, this is the memoir. Billy Crystal’s riffs on aging are timeless—the chapters on “Nodding Off” and “Buying the Plot” are a riot from start to finish.

Tina Fey shows us who’s the boss in this collection of spirited essays. She earned her bossy pants beginning with dreams of success and honing her skills so that they came true. Her work on Saturday Night Live is legend, and some are included in this inspiring memoir.

This memoir is a touching son-to-mother, mother-to-son tribute. It feels like a reckoning of ideals, beliefs, and life-changing experiences between Anderson Cooper and Gloria Vanderbilt. He exudes cool professionalism and journalistic integrity. His mother, despite great challenges, kept life real yet beautiful.

What is it about Brooklyn that makes people like Leah Remini become forces to reckon with? After years of close association, she broke with The Church of Scientology and ticked off the reasons why—publicly. She continues on the road to emotional and spiritual freedom.

One of the coolest women on the indie rock scene comes clean in her memoir. Michelle Zauner eats, cries, grieves, survives, as she continues to look for the goose bumps in her work. On the way, she digs into her Korean-ness, which she was fearful of losing with the death of her mother. It took time, but she did the work and brought to light who she really is.

Like his music, Dave Grohl’s words neither timid nor tamed—no surprise there. He shares the early years with Scream and the moment Kurt Cobain came calling and catapulted him literally into Nirvana, which ended with Cobain’s death. The hits kept coming—Foo Fighters, jamming with greats like Iggy Pop and Tom Petty. Bonus alert! Included are five demos never heard before.

Carsick, the true story of John Waters’s cross-country hitchhiking journey, will have listeners on the edges of their seats from Baltimore to San Francisco. It’s hard to believe the film director of cult classics Hairspray and Cry-Baby would go "undercover" as an average guy hitching rides, but Waters’s theatrical narration and enthusiasm are contagious, leaving listeners craving an equally spontaneous adventure.

Rolling Stones legend Keith Richards takes us on his own private tour of a life that rocked and rolled, and not always with the punches. There are the women and the debauchery, and then there’s the music. Richards pulled it together to write some huge hits. He speaks his truth in this dizzyingly honest memoir.

There’s a lot of taste in this memoir, and it’s not all on plates. Red Rooster and Aquavit chef Marcus Samuelsson gives us an inside look of his life from Ethiopia to Sweden, from lessons learned in his grandmother’s kitchen to becoming a chef in three-star restaurants. His life is a marvelous clash of spices and cultures.

If you’re in the mood to wallow in great wit and observations that, with all their absurdity, ring true, this is the memoir. Billy Crystal’s riffs on aging are timeless—the chapters on “Nodding Off” and “Buying the Plot” are a riot from start to finish.

Tina Fey shows us who’s the boss in this collection of spirited essays. She earned her bossy pants beginning with dreams of success and honing her skills so that they came true. Her work on Saturday Night Live is legend, and some are included in this inspiring memoir.

This memoir is a touching son-to-mother, mother-to-son tribute. It feels like a reckoning of ideals, beliefs, and life-changing experiences between Anderson Cooper and Gloria Vanderbilt. He exudes cool professionalism and journalistic integrity. His mother, despite great challenges, kept life real yet beautiful.

What is it about Brooklyn that makes people like Leah Remini become forces to reckon with? After years of close association, she broke with The Church of Scientology and ticked off the reasons why—publicly. She continues on the road to emotional and spiritual freedom.

One of the coolest women on the indie rock scene comes clean in her memoir. Michelle Zauner eats, cries, grieves, survives, as she continues to look for the goose bumps in her work. On the way, she digs into her Korean-ness, which she was fearful of losing with the death of her mother. It took time, but she did the work and brought to light who she really is.

Like his music, Dave Grohl’s words neither timid nor tamed—no surprise there. He shares the early years with Scream and the moment Kurt Cobain came calling and catapulted him literally into Nirvana, which ended with Cobain’s death. The hits kept coming—Foo Fighters, jamming with greats like Iggy Pop and Tom Petty. Bonus alert! Included are five demos never heard before.

This is the kind of memoir a listener wants to crawl into and make friends with the subject. Kal Penn is utterly charming. The Harold & Kumar star had his struggles with ole fashion Hollywood racism, but he made it anyway. Then, he shifted gears and went to work in the Obama White House, taking his good nature and humor with him.

This is the kind of memoir a listener wants to crawl into and make friends with the subject. Kal Penn is utterly charming. The Harold & Kumar star had his struggles with ole fashion Hollywood racism, but he made it anyway. Then, he shifted gears and went to work in the Obama White House, taking his good nature and humor with him.

Tiffany Haddish will make your day, rain or shine. Her memoir, a collection of essays, covers a lot of ground and some of it is uneven and rocky but with great comic style and timing. It’s hard to believe that she felt she never fit in because today, she fits in with the best of them in high places.

Bryan Cranston continues to surprise. It's ironic that he was cast as a child in commercial for United Way by his father, given his family didn’t stay united—his dad disappeared. At times riveting, with humor and humility, he chronicles his circuitous route to stardom, from soap operas to sitcoms to Broadway to breaking ground in Breaking Bad.

Like her heroic father, Meghan McCain doesn’t mince words when speaking her mind. That was evident when she was on The View. In this memoir, she puts everything on the table and more. Often called a Republican Rebel, McCain doesn’t follow the party line when it comes to women’s rights. Her views changed after a miscarriage and the birth of her daughter. Nothing bad there.

At last, Mariah Carey tells her story, her way—unfiltered and not through anyone else’s gaze. Known to be also funny and insightful, she shares her ups and downs and also her triumphs. While writing the memoir was a difficult task, the Grammy-winning star admits, it’s as impressive as those five octaves notes she delivers.

Brandi Carlile lived her truth before it was “in.” Her dysfunctional childhood made her the highly accomplished and talented adult she is today. Poverty and instability didn’t get in her way—and neither did her father calling her a loser. Included in this riveting listen are 30 songs—her own and those of artists who’ve inspired her.

Patti Smith’s poignant memoir is so real in a “let me tell you a story and it’s all true” way. Just Kids is about two friends who untiringly supported each other and their endeavors: Robert Mapplethorpe, as a photographer whose highly provocative work continues to stun to this day, while Smith’s work on her music landed her in the realm of Punk Rock royalty.

At 95, Brooks hasn’t lost one bit of his wit or his ability to tell an anecdote like no one else can. From tough Brooklyn beginnings to writer, producer, and director of megahits, his is a talent that comes along once in a century. He delivers big time in this sometimes laugh-so-hard-you’ll-cry memoir.

Actor Rob Lowe backs up his good looks with good stories and invaluable experiences that made him the man he is today. This grown-up member of the Brat Pack has learned life’s lessons well. A solid family man, he's corrected his excesses and written an enjoyable, entertaining memoir—especially for fans of the 80s.

Betty White lets it all (well, almost all) hang out in this very funny memoir. If You Ask Me is perfect for listening because White delivers her stories as only as she can, and gets away with it. The TV icon, who left us last year at age 99, will be sorely missed—but her humor and punch are here to stay.

Tiffany Haddish will make your day, rain or shine. Her memoir, a collection of essays, covers a lot of ground and some of it is uneven and rocky but with great comic style and timing. It’s hard to believe that she felt she never fit in because today, she fits in with the best of them in high places.

Bryan Cranston continues to surprise. It's ironic that he was cast as a child in commercial for United Way by his father, given his family didn’t stay united—his dad disappeared. At times riveting, with humor and humility, he chronicles his circuitous route to stardom, from soap operas to sitcoms to Broadway to breaking ground in Breaking Bad.

Like her heroic father, Meghan McCain doesn’t mince words when speaking her mind. That was evident when she was on The View. In this memoir, she puts everything on the table and more. Often called a Republican Rebel, McCain doesn’t follow the party line when it comes to women’s rights. Her views changed after a miscarriage and the birth of her daughter. Nothing bad there.

At last, Mariah Carey tells her story, her way—unfiltered and not through anyone else’s gaze. Known to be also funny and insightful, she shares her ups and downs and also her triumphs. While writing the memoir was a difficult task, the Grammy-winning star admits, it’s as impressive as those five octaves notes she delivers.

Brandi Carlile lived her truth before it was “in.” Her dysfunctional childhood made her the highly accomplished and talented adult she is today. Poverty and instability didn’t get in her way—and neither did her father calling her a loser. Included in this riveting listen are 30 songs—her own and those of artists who’ve inspired her.

Patti Smith’s poignant memoir is so real in a “let me tell you a story and it’s all true” way. Just Kids is about two friends who untiringly supported each other and their endeavors: Robert Mapplethorpe, as a photographer whose highly provocative work continues to stun to this day, while Smith’s work on her music landed her in the realm of Punk Rock royalty.

At 95, Brooks hasn’t lost one bit of his wit or his ability to tell an anecdote like no one else can. From tough Brooklyn beginnings to writer, producer, and director of megahits, his is a talent that comes along once in a century. He delivers big time in this sometimes laugh-so-hard-you’ll-cry memoir.

Actor Rob Lowe backs up his good looks with good stories and invaluable experiences that made him the man he is today. This grown-up member of the Brat Pack has learned life’s lessons well. A solid family man, he's corrected his excesses and written an enjoyable, entertaining memoir—especially for fans of the 80s.

Betty White lets it all (well, almost all) hang out in this very funny memoir. If You Ask Me is perfect for listening because White delivers her stories as only as she can, and gets away with it. The TV icon, who left us last year at age 99, will be sorely missed—but her humor and punch are here to stay.

Will Smith seems to have always been a superstar. Will is his self-imposed reality check. He wrote the memoir for himself and for his family, who were beginning to feel like they were becoming part of his circus. He knew he had to fix that, and fix it he did. Oh, and Will breaks into some rapping too.

Will Smith seems to have always been a superstar. Will is his self-imposed reality check. He wrote the memoir for himself and for his family, who were beginning to feel like they were becoming part of his circus. He knew he had to fix that, and fix it he did. Oh, and Will breaks into some rapping too.

Tom Morello has an electric personality that matches his guitar playing. Born to an Irish-Italian mother and Kenyan father, he talks about the racism he encountered in Libertyville, Ohio. His mother taught him how to crush it when he was five. He is funny, he is a force, and the man sure can play.

Get ready to be regaled with real-life stories filled with gumption—"Cha" has plenty of it. He had the privilege of growing up in a small town in South Carolina, where many life lessons were learned and informed his success. Cha speaks his truth freely and honestly in this memoir packed with sage advice.

Bruce Campbell’s memoir is one of a kind. An admitted "B actor," he tells us all about blue-collar Hollywood, where guys like him are kept in their supposed place. No need to shed tears—he is entertaining, funny, and spills the beans like a seasoned insider in this A-list memoir.

Listening to Alanis Morissette is like hanging out on the phone with a friend catching you up on what she’s thinking and where she’s been. But when she sings, that’s another story—one worthy of turning up the volume to hear.

James Taylor has a story to tell, songs to sing, and memories to share—and share he does in this touchingly one-of-a kind listening experience. “Fire and Rain” continues to sound like something wonderful, and still has the power to move with each lyric.

It sounds like a cliché, but these two musicians really do make beautiful music together in many ways—in their lyrics, their rhythms, and their lives. In this two-in-one memoir, Sleater-Kinney rockers Carrie Brownstein and Corin Tucker speak their truths, and don’t miss a beat.

Diane Guerrero’s life changed in a way that was unimaginable for a 14-year-old: her parents were deported from the home they shared in Boston back to their native Colombia. Born in America, Guerrero was able to stay and more than survive—she thrived. One of the stars of Orange Is the New Black, she shines a poignant light on the plight of immigrants.

Sharon Stone had to suffer a massive stroke to get to the good place she is today. Her stunning looks belie her toughness in a town that knows how to gobble up even the strongest. This memoir will leave you not only in awe of this renowned actor's resilience and courage but feeling enlightened.

Writer, director, producer, and trans rights activist, Janet Mock shares her story of growing up and coming out to family and friends. It wasn’t until she lived in New York as her true self that she found her calling. Multitalented and outspoken, she has become a force in LGBTQIA+ activism.

Tom Morello has an electric personality that matches his guitar playing. Born to an Irish-Italian mother and Kenyan father, he talks about the racism he encountered in Libertyville, Ohio. His mother taught him how to crush it when he was five. He is funny, he is a force, and the man sure can play.

Get ready to be regaled with real-life stories filled with gumption—"Cha" has plenty of it. He had the privilege of growing up in a small town in South Carolina, where many life lessons were learned and informed his success. Cha speaks his truth freely and honestly in this memoir packed with sage advice.

Bruce Campbell’s memoir is one of a kind. An admitted "B actor," he tells us all about blue-collar Hollywood, where guys like him are kept in their supposed place. No need to shed tears—he is entertaining, funny, and spills the beans like a seasoned insider in this A-list memoir.

Listening to Alanis Morissette is like hanging out on the phone with a friend catching you up on what she’s thinking and where she’s been. But when she sings, that’s another story—one worthy of turning up the volume to hear.

James Taylor has a story to tell, songs to sing, and memories to share—and share he does in this touchingly one-of-a kind listening experience. “Fire and Rain” continues to sound like something wonderful, and still has the power to move with each lyric.

It sounds like a cliché, but these two musicians really do make beautiful music together in many ways—in their lyrics, their rhythms, and their lives. In this two-in-one memoir, Sleater-Kinney rockers Carrie Brownstein and Corin Tucker speak their truths, and don’t miss a beat.

Diane Guerrero’s life changed in a way that was unimaginable for a 14-year-old: her parents were deported from the home they shared in Boston back to their native Colombia. Born in America, Guerrero was able to stay and more than survive—she thrived. One of the stars of Orange Is the New Black, she shines a poignant light on the plight of immigrants.

Sharon Stone had to suffer a massive stroke to get to the good place she is today. Her stunning looks belie her toughness in a town that knows how to gobble up even the strongest. This memoir will leave you not only in awe of this renowned actor's resilience and courage but feeling enlightened.

Writer, director, producer, and trans rights activist, Janet Mock shares her story of growing up and coming out to family and friends. It wasn’t until she lived in New York as her true self that she found her calling. Multitalented and outspoken, she has become a force in LGBTQIA+ activism.

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