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Publisher's Summary

Adrianna Moore has just had a double shock: the death of her father and the discovery that he has left his entire estate to his lawyer. The lawyer, a repulsive social climber, tells her that to regain her inheritance, she must marry him "a week from Sunday". Adrianna takes off, driving desperately to a new life. Caught in a violent rainstorm, she collides with an oncoming truck. Quinn Baxter, the driver of the truck, demands repayment for his lost cargo. They reach a bargain: she will live in his home, tutor his bedridden younger brother, and play piano in Quinn's tavern to pay off her debt.

Drawn to the rugged Quinn and challenged by the interaction with the tavern patrons, she also must deal with an intractable foe: Quinn's housekeeper, who is scheming to become his wife. All the while, the spurned lawyer is following Adrianna's trail, determined to find her and force her to marry him.

©2007 Dorothy Garlock; (P)2007 Tantor

Critic Reviews

"The premier writer of Americana romance." (Booklist)
"Garlock's many readers will be satisfied by the triumph of good and love over evil and greed." (Publishers Weekly)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
  • Hannah
  • Lubbock, TX, USA
  • 01-31-08

Boo Narrator

This is one of the all time worst narrators. Apparently to her, all male characters have scratchy voices. It irritated me all the way through the story. Male does not equate scratchy. Surely there is a more creative narrator out in the world with better ability.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • erin
  • new orleans, LA, United States
  • 04-18-08

Wanted: Narrator

This book HAS to be read again. The accents, inflections made for a painful experience. I wish I had read the reviews before purchasing.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Carey
  • Houston, TX, United States
  • 01-05-09

Innacurate in many ways....

The story is interesting, but I had a hard time listening to the narrator. This was the worst attempt at cajun dialogue that I have ever heard. Having spent 17 years in south Louisiana, I was appalled at this attempt. This narrator had the cajuns in this story sounding like backwoods mountain characters with a 3rd grade education. Her attempt to replicate the cajun patois was way off the mark.

I normally like the writings of Dorothy Garlock, but the innacuracies in this story were glaringly apparent. For example, North La. is the home of lumber mills and pine forests used for logging. South La. is the home of cajuns and in 1930's So. La. there wasn't a lot of mixing between the people of So. La. and the people of North La. Since interstate highways hadn't been built yet, people stayed in the area where they were raised--geographically close to their extended families. It was not at all like the cultural melting pot we see today. I still can't figure out where this fictional town is supposed to be located because of this irregularity.

Also, the author mixes up a lot of the Acadian/cajun dialect with Parisian French dialect. For example, the cajun people of So. La. do speak cajun french, but it is far different from the french spoken in France. There are a lot of regional phrases that are used in So. La. that would never be used in France. Conversely, things that would sound normal in France, would never be said in South La. Those are the things that kept showing up in this story. The character of Gabe is not believable in this story because of his language. For example, Gabe calls Adrianna "mademoiselle" many times in this story. In reality, he might call her "Cherie" or "Cher" (pronounced Sha), but never mademmoiselle. Next time someone wants to write a story about cajuns, I highly recommend that they talk to authentic cajuns before starting.

That said, I still enjoyed it.

  • Overall
  • OwlEyez
  • Cincinnati, OH USA
  • 02-01-08

Not recommended

Honestly, this has to be one of the most painful experiences with audio books. I liked the narration, but the voice she used for the heroine was weak and very immature sounding. The heroine has some backbone to make her getaway at the beginning of the book, but it's all down hill from there.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful