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Publisher's Summary

In this eagerly awaited follow-up to The Lion's Game, John Corey, former NYPD Homicide detective and special agent for the Anti-Terrorist Task Force, is back. And, unfortunately for Corey, so is Asad Khalil, the notorious Libyan terrorist otherwise known as "The Lion". Last we heard from him, Khali had claimed to be defecting to the US only to unleash the most horrific reign of terrorism ever to occur on American soil. While Corey and his partner, FBI agent Kate Mayfield, chased him across the country, Khalil methodically eliminated his victims one by one and then disappeared without a trace.

Now, years later, Khalil has returned to America to make good on his threats and take care of unfinished business. "The Lion" is a killing machine once again loose in America with a mission of revenge, and John Corey will stop at nothing to achieve his own goal - to find and kill Khahil.

©2010 Nelson DeMille (P)2010 Hachette

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    2,147
  • 4 Stars
    1,260
  • 3 Stars
    408
  • 2 Stars
    100
  • 1 Stars
    78

Performance

  • 4.6 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    1,566
  • 4 Stars
    465
  • 3 Stars
    99
  • 2 Stars
    19
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    25

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5.0
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    1,344
  • 4 Stars
    612
  • 3 Stars
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  • 2 Stars
    36
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    23
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  • Overall
  • Performance
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More John Corey!

He is back with his wise crack comments, his wifes sharp tongue, his race with adventure. This is pretty graphic in ways to commit murder while at the same time it is entertaining. Scott Brick is perfect!

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

A Must Read For DeMille Fans

I have read and or listened to every novel DeMille has written. With the exception of Wildfire, I recommend them all. This is a great story, highly entertaining.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

DeMille Sells Fear

Re: John Corey Series
DeMilIe, like all new (to me) authors, was read chronologically. The formula is identical in all these ponderous tales, with three or four climaxes along the way. The finale is usually anti-climactic and relatively weak relative to the gore and terror along the way. The demeanor and moral emptiness of Corey is revealed in Wildfire, where our 'hero' nearly succumbs to his primeval reality and allows that perhaps this end does justify this means. The sub-context of his work is that unless the Muslim world is annihilated, it is just a matter of time before nuclear war is delivered to our door by these madmen.

Huge sections of these books are interchangeable with similar parts of the others. They drone on and on with Corey defying the clueless machinations of the FBI and the sinister CIA. If you do not believe that we are helplessly fumbling our way toward global Armageddon, then these books are not for you.

Meanwhile DeMille rakes in millions by simply asking, "what if?". Are these books a call to arms to the violent, lunatic fringe? They may well be. DeMille's self-serving arrogance takes a grain of truth all the way to the bank.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Should have quit after the Lion's Game

I read Night Fall, The Lion's Game and The Lion in that order. The first two were great (especially Night Fall), but DeMille should have quit after The Lion's Game. It was just the right touch to leave people with the ending in their own minds.
I really like the character Cory in all the books. I think DeMille has captured the essence of a New York detective pretty effectively. But this book had Cory in countless boring meetings describing the boring nature of the meetings. Even Scott Brick, who was phenomenal in all of the other books, failed us here. Everyone sounded exactly the same and it was not good. The book does pick up near the end and it has one unexpected twist, but not enough to defeat the very didactic ending. Also, in this book Ahsad Khalil lacks any depth and there is not nearly enough of what was going on in his mind.
Worth it? I suppose, but I think this was a book DeMille did not really want to write.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Holley
  • st louis, MO, United States
  • 07-14-10

Bad beyond belief

Mr. DeMille wrote one third of a book and rambled to an extremely boring conclusion.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Karen
  • Cayce, SC, United States
  • 07-05-10

written with the screen in mind?

I have enjoyed all of the Corey books and DeMille. However, this one seemed to have so much unnecessarily graphic violence that it detracted from the story. Still - more John and Kate!

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

tedious

I enjoy the author. Having said that, his persistent use of adolescent sarcasm reminds you of a failed comedian who is clueless as to why he has failed. This well known narrator also uses such a tedious style of interpreting the main character that you want to blow your own brains out by the end of the book.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

A Triple, Not a Home Run

DeMille is one of my favorite authors, Brick is my very favorite male narrator and John Corey is the type of guy I want to marry. And, yeah, I know he's a fictitious character. I found the book suspenseful. There are certain things we know will happen, but don't know how or when. The story brought home how 9/11 affected New Yorkers more than the rest of the country. While I did enjoy the book on the whole, there were aspects that bothered me. 1. It was never explained how Khalil knew about the skydiving appointment. I couldn't help but think that had to have been obtained from someone close to the Coreys. 2. In some parts, the book was very close to crossing the line between thriller and gore. But perhaps I'm just squeamish. 3. Brick's narration was inconsistent. After listening for a few minutes, I did check to see if it was Brick narrating. This one started out monotone, overwrought, with a cadence that annoyed me. It was as though Brick's voice had aged. But from time to time, his "regular" John Corey voice came through. 4. Corey's smartass remarks went a little too far, even for me. 5. Overboard on the unPC jokes. We get it, Corey is unPC. But it was a good enough story that I was able to enjoy the book and narration. It was like watching Albert Pujols at bat, anticipating a home run and settling for a solid base-hit.

8 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Nathan
  • Bayfield, CO, United States
  • 06-16-10

Not as good as the first one...

I LOVED the first book and I am a huge Nelson DeMille fan, but this one just didn't do it for me. It had a harder edge than the first book, but less action in my opinion. There was a lot of needless F-Bombs dropping too. It was just OK for me.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Jane
  • Chicago, IL, United States
  • 09-03-13

Disappointing sequel to The Lion’s Game.

The only value is to satisfy your curiosity if you read The Lion’s Game. Do not read this as a stand alone.

There were three action scenes in the beginning of the book with Asad killing people. Then the huge middle section of the book felt like filler. Too wordy with political ponderings. Too much internal thinking and monologuing. Too much repetitive thinking about past events. Finally we get some action toward the end.

This book would have been better if we could have seen how Asad got his information, how his sources got information, and how Asad and those sources communicated.

I did not understand why the authorities did not put Asad’s picture in the newspapers and on TV. Asad is running around the country interacting with people.

One scene was kind of unbelievable. Two guys want to kill each other but they throw down their guns in order to fight hand to hand with knives.

Scott Brick did a good job as John Corey because Scott does cocky arrogance well. John Corey’s arrogance was written in an entertaining way so it worked. But I’ve given Scott Brick 1 and 2 stars for his narration of other books where he was too arrogant, and it detracted from the book.

Genre: suspense thriller

4 of 5 people found this review helpful