Regular price: $27.99

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
  • Get access to the Member Daily Deal
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

INCLUDES AN EXTENDED INTERVIEW WITH NELSON DEMILLE AND SCOTT BRICK!

From the legendary number-one New York Times best-selling author of Plum Island and Night Fall, Nelson DeMille's blistering new novel features an exciting new character - US Army combat veteran Daniel "Mac" MacCormick, now a charter boat captain, who is about to set sail on his most dangerous cruise.

Daniel Graham MacCormick - Mac for short - seems to have a pretty good life. At age 35 he's living in Key West, owner of a 42-foot charter fishing boat, The Maine. Mac served five years in the army as an infantry officer, with two tours in Afghanistan. He returned with the Silver Star, two Purple Hearts, scars that don't tan, and a boat with a big bank loan. Truth be told, Mac's finances are more than a little shaky.

One day Mac is sitting in the famous Green Parrot Bar in Key West, contemplating his life and waiting for Carlos, a hotshot Miami lawyer heavily involved with anti-Castro groups. Carlos wants to hire Mac and The Maine for a 10-day fishing tournament to Cuba at the standard rate, but Mac suspects there is more to this and turns it down. The price then goes up to $2 million, and Mac agrees to hear the deal and meet Carlos's clients - a beautiful Cuban American woman named Sara Ortega and a mysterious older Cuban exile, Eduardo Valazquez.

What Mac learns is that there is 60 million American dollars hidden in Cuba by Sara's grandfather when he fled Castro's revolution. With the "Cuban Thaw" underway between Havana and Washington, Carlos, Eduardo, and Sara know it's only a matter of time before someone finds the stash - by accident or on purpose. And Mac knows if he accepts this job, he'll walk away rich...or not at all.

Brilliantly written, with his signature humor, fascinating authenticity from his research trip to Cuba, and heart-pounding pace. Nelson DeMille is a true master of the genre.

©2017 Nelson DeMille (P)2017 S&S Audio

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2,453
  • 4 Stars
    1,343
  • 3 Stars
    697
  • 2 Stars
    237
  • 1 Stars
    156

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    3,007
  • 4 Stars
    1,002
  • 3 Stars
    354
  • 2 Stars
    105
  • 1 Stars
    80

Story

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2,107
  • 4 Stars
    1,270
  • 3 Stars
    692
  • 2 Stars
    270
  • 1 Stars
    184
Sort by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Fun read with a continuous build, ok finish

This book is an enjoyable listen and classic DeMille style. The intensity steadily builds throughout the book until the really enjoyable penultimate scene. Unfortunately, the ending is typical for a DeMille book that uses geopolitics and real world implications as a plot point, in that it is not very satisfying. There are plenty of twists, unearthing of selfish plots, and good character development through the chapters.
I enjoyed this book, but it felt like a weaker version of Up Country. You can feel Nelson DeMille didn't have as strong a connection to Mac as he did Paul Brenner. I still recommend The Cuban Affair, but try Up Country and definitely the John Corey series if you haven't already.

28 of 30 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Ugh

This was a bad story from beginning to end. He can do better. Totally predictable and totally unbelievable. Very disappointing.

15 of 16 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Disappointing

This is the sixth DeMille book I have listened to or read. I loved all of them until this. Most of his books had me hooked quickly but this one did not. This book seemed slow to me. My mind kept wandering as I listened to it so I continually had to replay sections and force myself to pay attention. The end of the book finally had some excitement. This is also the first DeMille book where I just did not find the main characters likable enough to pull for them. I highly recommend Nelson DeMille books. Just not this one.

20 of 22 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Slow Motion

DeMille is the master of dialogue, but he overdoes it in this work. Too much chatting and not enough doing. He treads treacherously close to Dan Brown Guide Book territory in telling us about every square inch of Cuba. All that is interesting for someone who might plan a trip there, but for the rest of us, get on with the story that we want from the guy who has written some seriously excellent books. DeMille eventually gets to the end with bullets flying, but I had to speed up the narration to 1.25 to get there.

11 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

cliche

One of the first books on tape that I ever listened to (and subsequently became hooked) was Demille's Upcountry. The Cuban Affair is a poor imitation of that-- an ex-military entering a foreign/hostile country and along the way, reliving some of his post traumatic stress. Upcountry is much, much better.
The story is predictable, contrite, and cliche. It feels like Demille wrote the story until he got bored and then ended it. The story line is ridiculous, the characters not believable, and, though in general I like Scott Brick, he reads the main character in such a bitter and cynical tone that it is impossible to like him (the character, not Brick).

14 of 16 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Not so good

Monotonous tone by the reader. I swear at chapter 35 or so a new reader was reading. The story was pretty slow paced and boring. I am not a fan of this book. I wish I could get a refund.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • r
  • spring lake, nj, United States
  • 10-18-17

A big zero

Absolutely nothing to the book. No story no point. Hours of filler. DeMilles worst. Did he even write it ?

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

This is NOT a Nelson book.

Terrible story. Stupid plot. Horrible characters. The whole thing was so unbelievable I wonder if it was ghost written. Save yourself and do NOT listen to this one.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Worst Demille ever!

This book went on and on but never went anywhere. I am acutely disappointed because it never got better.

8 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Hot Mess...but a Fun hot mess


On that Sunday morning show, I saw DeMille and his wife, remembered seeing this title as a new release, and the neural activity in my brain signaled a marketing success. It's nowhere near *Contemporary Literature.* It's not even a spectacular piece of fiction, but rather a by-the-numbers action/suspense book written by one of the ol' boy's club authors that you may have encountered under the pen names of Jack Cannon, Kurt Ladner, Ellen Kay and Brad Matthews. The book could easily have been shaved down to a pamphlet, (my gosh, I thought the boat chases would never end) but where's the fun in that? DeMille sets this debacle in Cuba, allowing for pages and pages of political hyperbole that takes place over lots of cigar smoke and gallons of cuba libres.

I just have to separate the fact that I used up a credit on this from my rating...because it was okay. Or is that emotional manipulation by the author talking? There is a switcheroo to that undercover *treasure* reclamation job that I found redeeming...but, I still watch Die Hard when I'm flipping through the channels late at night and nothing else is on -- and like it. So, Yippie-Ki-Yay; grab a cigar, a rum and Coke and kill a credit.

11 of 13 people found this review helpful