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Publisher's Summary

The best-selling author of The Botany of Desire explores the ecology of eating to unveil why we consume what we consume in the 21st century.

"What should we have for dinner?" To one degree or another, this simple question assails any creature faced with a wide choice of things to eat. Anthropologists call it the omnivore's dilemma. Choosing from among the countless potential foods nature offers, humans have had to learn what is safe, and what isn't, which mushrooms should be avoided, for example, and which berries we can enjoy. Today, as America confronts what can only be described as a national eating disorder, the omnivore's dilemma has returned with an atavistic vengeance.

The cornucopia of the modern American supermarket and fast-food outlet has thrown us back on a bewildering landscape where we once again have to worry about which of those tasty-looking morsels might kill us. At the same time we're realizing that our food choices also have profound implications for the health of our environment. The Omnivore's Dilemma is best-selling author Michael Pollan's brilliant and eye-opening exploration of these little-known but vitally important dimensions of eating in America.

We are indeed what we eat, and what we eat remakes the world. A society of voracious and increasingly confused omnivores, we are just beginning to recognize the profound consequences of the simplest everyday food choices, both for ourselves and for the natural world. The Omnivore's Dilemma is a long-overdue book and one that will become known for bringing a completely fresh perspective to a question as ordinary and yet momentous as "What shall we have for dinner?"

©2006 Michael Pollan; (P)2006 Penguin Audio

Critic Reviews

  • National Book Critics Circle 2006 Award Finalist, Nonfiction

"Remarkably clearheaded book....A fascinating journey up and down the food chain." (Publishers Weekly)
"His supermeticulous reporting is the book's strength - you're not likely to get a better explanation of where your food comes from....In an uncommonly good year for American food writing, this is a book that stands out." (The New York Times Book Review)
"Completely charming." (Nora Ephron)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • 4.5 out of 5.0
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Story

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Eye opening sorry

Great story of how our food lands on our plates. He discusses both sides of the potential moral dilemma of being an omnivore. Excellent narration!

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Meh...

Any additional comments?

I'm actually writing this review upon doing some library cleanup on my account. It has been about 30 days since I finished it, and I don't remember most of it. It was not nearly as engaging as I had hoped for it to be. If this kind of content fascinates you, then you will likely enjoy it. Otherwise, I wouldn't recommend.

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Will change the way you think about food

This book changed the way I think and feel about the food on my plate. It isn't a particularly enjoyable read, Pollan is a bit didactic at times, but the narrative string is there enough to follow through as you learn about the industrial food change, organic and beyond organic foods, and even hunting and gathering (although in retrospect I might have stopped reading before that last chapter).

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Are you what you eat?

My doctor encouraged me to get this book, so it took some time before I picked it up. Now I am the one recommending the book. If you have taken the time to get read this then just get it. You will not regret the decision.

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Engaging journey into our food chain

This book was wonderful. It took me nearly 4 months to finish because I had to pause to digest the the information given regularly. I have begun to think differently about the food that I eat and what it means to be responsible about my food. I loved it!

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Wonderful!

I loved everything about this thought provoking book. It has changed the way I look at all the food I put I my mouth.

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Everyone should read this book

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes, its education yet entertaining, enlightening, and just good. There are some slow parts but still great book. It could also be the narrator that makes it feel slow to me at parts.

Who was your favorite character and why?

...

What about Scott Brick’s performance did you like?

Yes, sometimes i feel like he should get more action into his voice, he was very level paced and voiced the whole time so its just felt slow in certain areas

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

All of it, just and eye opening book. Its changed my perception on a lot of things

Any additional comments?

I plan on reading the rest of his books over time!

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Good idea dragged out way too long

The idea and topic is a good one. The book however repeats the same information over and over making it drag on.

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Review

The book could have been half the size if it weren't for a lot of unnecessary details.

The first half was definitely more interesting and scientific.
I enjoyed the first half of the book and couldn't wait till next chapter came to listen to.

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Love this book, Hate the reader

Would you listen to The Omnivore's Dilemma again? Why?

Probably not, I would rather read it than hear this reader.

How could the performance have been better?

With a different reader this book would sound as brilliant as it is, that is the only place it falls short.