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Publisher's Summary

Philosophy professor Christina Sommers has exposed a disturbing development: how a group of zealots, claiming to speak for all women, are promoting a dangerous new agenda that threatens our most cherished ideals and sets women against men in all spheres of life. In case after case, Sommers shows how these extremists have propped up their arguments with highly questionable but well-funded research, presenting inflammatory and often inaccurate information and stifling any semblance of free and open scrutiny. Trumpeted as orthodoxy, the resulting "findings" on everything from rape to domestic abuse to economic bias to the supposed crisis in girls' self-esteem perpetuate a view of women as victims of the "patriarchy".

Who Stole Feminism? is a call to arms that will enrage or inspire, but cannot be ignored.

©1994 Christina Hoff Sommers; (P)1996 Blackstone Audio Inc.

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  • Overall

Long for an updated edition

When I hear women my age proudly claim they are defiantly NOT feminists, I am taken aback. Ms. Sommers does an excellent job of showing just why so many young women are running away from the feminist label. They don't want to be associated with man-haters: women who view every man as a potential rapist and every woman a potential survivor. She highlights many of the events from the late eighties and early nineties that ended up giving feminism a very bad name. Rather than trying to promote equal rights for all humanity (the so-called equity feminists), some feminists (gender feminists) are trying to supplant the patriarchy with a matriarchy. To do so, they overblow poorly done studies and try to silence maleness wherever it rears its ugly head (pun, unfortunately, intended). She does such a good job of pointing out the hysteria and rancor of this sect of feminists, I had to remind myself constantly that I agree with her thesis-those kinds of feminists are bad for feminism. They take away from the social justice that generations of women have fought for; they stray from the goals of the Seneca Falls Convention and forget that many sisters around the world really are being suppressed; they devalue the terms sexual harassment and rape by having them apply to everything. I'm grateful she kept repeating the goals of equality through her book or I would have completely forgotten I wasn't reading the transcripts of a Rush Limbaugh show (a mistake none of us ever wants to make!).

This book was written in 1995, so I was still in junior high and high school when most of these events were unfolding. I wonder how much of her arguments are simply overblown to give evidence to her thesis, how much was relegated only to certain university campuses, and how much has mercifully blown over in the past decade. I would love to see an updated version of this book. In the meantime, I'll read books like The Mommy Myth and Selling Anxiety.

14 of 16 people found this review helpful

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Good narration of a great and important book

Wow. I knew they were distorting things but didn't know it was this bad and this organized. This book shows how badly feminism got derailed by malicious misandrists and aided by gullible journalists and politicians and highlights why it needs to return to reality so we can fix what is actually wrong instead of diverting funds to the wrong causes of hateful idealogs. It's no wonder few women call themselves feminists anymore. I thought at first that it was a shame that Sommers didn't narrate it herself, but the narrator does an excellent job and it was a joy to listen to.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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a good book

Extremely informative, well researched and powerful, while a little dry, still makes for an eye opening experience.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

An excellent and well supported argument

Christina Hoff Sommers does an excellent job of presenting her point - that the modern, North American view of "feminism" is being swayed by people that are more interested in political agendas than equality between the genders. By citing specific cases where statistics have been interpreted with bias, where feminist groups promoting a "better way of interacting" have failed to successfully work together, and where the media has been more interested in sensational stories than proper fact verification, "Who Stole Feminism?" is successful at showing the reader that there may be more behind the current feminist movement than the surface suggests.

While presenting a strong argument for the "equity feminist" view point, I feel the novel still suggests that the reader make their own decision and come to their own conclusion. Christina Hoff Sommers strongly encourages people to review claims made by any feminist group, and to verify results of studies before coming to a conclusion.

The book makes it clear that, while there is still perhaps a great deal of work left to achieving equality between the genders, headway has already been made and the future is not as dismal as others may make it appear to be.

As a male that supports equality, this was one of the first books I have read on the subject that has not made me feel like my gender was being stereotyped and attacked for the transgressions of people I have never met.

11 of 14 people found this review helpful

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Splendidly Researched

Fact checks the many pieces of research constantly repeated as feminist talking points and finds a mix of truth, poor research and sometimes outright fabrications now accepted without analysis.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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eye opening; shows the other side of the story

Great read for critical thinkers who want to hear both sides of the feminist plight. I wanted to highlight almost every line in this book!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Eye opener

Presents strong rational arguments in an easy to digest way. Saves feminism from the angry misandrists who are driving people away from feminism.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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An academic masterpiece

Dr. Sommers' book 'Who Stole Feminism' is as relevant a study of the "radical" Gender Feminist overtaking of the third-wave feminist movement as any today. As an old guard feminist, Dr. Sommers courageously endeavors to uncover the the truth of the statistical, social, and academic record of the movement around its height in 1994, and shows the modern reader the twenty-year-old face of a still incomprehensibly fragmentary movement; One that betrays the promise of liberty and equality, in a variety of ways, in the name of the opposite.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Good book that you shouldn't bother reading

This is one of those books that someone had to write, and I'm glad to know it's out there. Sommers carefully documents all of the craziness in the feminist movement in the 1990s, and there sure was a lot of it! Claims that sexual assaults increase massively Superbowl weekend (they don't) or that the leading cause of miscarriage is domestic abuse (not even close) were bandied about wildly without regard for truth. What's more fun is the portrayal of academic conferences and the crazy one-upswomanship: when some of the attendees gathered in a drum circle, others declared that this was an appropriation of their cultural traditions and demanded they stop, which they did reluctantly. It's a delightful image of what happens when claims of marginalization become badges of honor.

Yes, the book is very dated. This of course makes you wonder whether things have gotten better. I have no idea.

Ultimately, this is one of those books that needed to be written but that isn't worth reading. Feel comfortable knowing that someone has done the work of collating all the craziness. And yes, Sommers has some affiliation with conservative hacks. That's unfortunate, but to my reading, this doesn't really affect the book.

4 of 7 people found this review helpful

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A well researched and well written book.

Who Stole Feminism is a fine and well written book full of useful information and facts. However, as is the case in so many non-fiction works, the reading of the book has all of the energy and spirit one would expect to encounter at an Ambien laden insurance seminar.

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  • Marlow
  • 06-26-14

Still Essential Reading

Any additional comments?

Hoff Sommers seminal 1994 book, although written from within feminism, still remains essential reading for anyone interested in properly understanding the ideology. As a philosophy professor she brings logical argument and evidence to her critique of feminism, and she has the integrity to expose many of its hypocrisies. Her exposure of the dishonesty of feminist research methods was particularly courageous and enlightening for someone writing in the 1990s. This book would be a very useful introduction to the critique of feminism for any reader who has only read pro-feminist books in their life thus far because Hoff Sommers is attempting to revise feminism rather than oppose it outright and so her critique may be more acceptable to a reader who is conventionally feminist but nonetheless willing to listen to criticism of it. Any pro-equality/anti-feminist readers may find her persistent loyalty to feminism a little irksome but the book is a landmark in equality literature and it is still a valuable and rewarding read/listen.

5 of 7 people found this review helpful

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  • SamanthafromKentishTown
  • 09-22-17

Awful narrator

Should have used a younger sounding narrator. This one sounds like a stuffy, annoying, school mistress, and it makes me switch off despite the content.

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  • damien
  • 07-03-17

Eye opening!

A very eye opening and detailed breakdown of how ideological feminism has become the establishment