One Nation Under Therapy

How the Helping Culture is Eroding Self-Reliance
Narrated by: Dianna Dorman
Length: 8 hrs and 30 mins
4 out of 5 stars (54 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Americans have traditionally placed great value on self-reliance and fortitude. Recent decades, however, have seen the rise of a therapeutic ethic that views Americans as emotionally underdeveloped, requiring the ministrations of mental-health professionals to cope with life's vicissitudes. Today, having a book for every ailment, a counselor for every crisis, a lawsuit for every grievance, and a TV show for every problem degrades one's native ability to cope with life's challenges.

Drawing on established science and common sense, the authors reveal how "therapism" and the burgeoning trauma industry have come to pervade our lives. Topical, provocative, and wryly amusing, One Nation Under Therapy demonstrates that "talking about" problems is no substitute for confronting them.

©2005 Christina Hoff Sommers and Sally Satel (P)2006 Blackstone Audio Inc.

Critic Reviews

"[Sommers and Satel] review the relevant literature, letting its conclusions speak for themselves...they don't have to apply spin to be convincing....Well-written, well-informed public affairs argumentation." ( Booklist)
"Sommers and Satel's book is a summons to the sensible worry that national enfeeblement must result when 'therapism' replaces the virtues on which the republic was founded: stoicism, self-reliance, and courage." ( Washington Post)

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

If you want another perspective

I was a little reluctant to get this book but glad I did. The book gives a succint analysis of the processes involved in the rise of psychology and helping, with accessible examples that we can all relate to. The central point is that seeking help has become a social necessity when mostly it unnecessary. Well written and well ordered for audio. I like the narrators voice, calming older lady. Generally the book gives a bit of balance and thought to the medicalisation of human emotions. Have a listen if you are sick of being coddled or coddling others.

11 people found this helpful

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Everyone should read this book, especially if you have kids

This is a terrific book that provides a much needed wake up call to the creeping notion that basic human emotions are pathological and all we really need is therapy. I wish I had bought the hard copy so I could go back and look at all the sentences I would've underlined. If you are at all concerned that we are becoming a nation of people who lack the will to fight and whine far too often, this book is for you. If that previous sentence drives you crazy, it is not.

3 people found this helpful

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Fascinating reading and vital knowledge.

This goes in depth into something impacting all of us and our kids that we do not usually get to see into.

1 person found this helpful

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boring narrator that puts you to sleep

terrible narrator. kskdkdfkkckckckckckvjvkv jdkdj jdjj j j j j k k. kk k. i j

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Conservative Tripe

This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

Someone who wants to go back to the good old days with no real analysis of the bad things of those old days.

What was most disappointing about Christina Hoff Sommers and Sally Satel ’s story?

She throws together every conservative complaint about the degeneration of our society even going so far as to argue that self-esteme isn't necessarily a good thing.

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

She does have some valid criticisms that are interesting to think about, but the reactionary lens of her evidence is pretty useless.

Any additional comments?

Disclaimer: I only read about a third of the book, but that was enough. I'm neither conservative nor liberal in the modern senses, but this book reminds me why I'm not a conservative.

2 people found this helpful

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  • 12-14-19

Brilliant, well narrated and thought provoking

I really enjoyed this book, as it opened my eyes to the extent of coddling going on in the American culture because of therapism colluding with the government..

Just as any business, therapism would go to great lengths to advertise itself and try to convince the consumer that he needs what therapism offers. And many people do benefit greatly from the array of services and all the research done in the field of psychology and counseling.

Terapism is big business, and while there's nothing whatsoever wrong with an industry being profitable and promoting its services, there's a problem when it colludes with big government to push its services onto the public, at the public's own expense.

One Nation Under Therapy discusses all the ways in which this collusion is at best wasting a ton of money and at worst creating a weaker less resilient nation.