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Publisher's Summary

Reunited by a grave robber and a corpse, Navajo Tribal Police Lieutenant Joe Leaphorn is trying to determine the identity of a murder victim, while Officer Jim Chee is arresting Smithsonian conservator Henry Highhawk for ransacking the sacred bones of his ancestors.

But with each peeled-back layer, it becomes shockingly clear that these two cases are mysteriously connected - and that others are pusuing Highhawk, with lethal intentions. And the search for answers to a deadly puzzle is pulling Leaphorn and Chee into the perilous arena of superstition, ancient ceremony, and living gods.

©1989 Tony Hillerman (P)2013 HarperCollinsPublishers

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Navajo Nation lives

Any additional comments?

All of Tony Hillerman's books about the Navajo land are good. This one brings Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee to the Nation's capital to find out why a body appears in Navajo Land that traces back to Washington D.C. Neither are happy to be away from the Sacred Mountains. The narrator does okay but he isn't George Guidall. I heard most of these stories read by Guidall and it really spoils you. The story is very good . . . the narrator leaves much to be desired. It's hard to tell who is talking because most of the voices sound the same . . . maybe a southern drawl but the sound is the same.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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  • Brad
  • Littleton, MA, United States
  • 10-14-13

Revisiting Talking God

I read this book when it was published in 1969. I decided to revisit it via Audible. I love all of Tony Hillerman's Navajo mysteries. In his books you get a deep and loving exposure to the Navaho way of life and religion.
 
There are two Navajo detectives in virtually all of Hillerman's novels, Jim Chee, a budding religious figure and lower level officer in the Navaho Tribal Police. The older and wiser Lieutenant Joe Leaphorn makes a very superior detective. The plot starts with an unidentified body found by a railroad in a near impossible location. Chee and Leaphorn pursue differing crimes and find that they merge in Washington DC. This is a very solid entry in the series. 

Just a nit, the narration is fine. Originally the books on tape were narrated by Tony Hillerman with his gravelly, worldly voice. I miss Tony as a author and miss listening to him. He was an acknowledged master of mystery writing.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Alison
  • Asheville, NC, United States
  • 06-12-13

We're Not in New Mexico Anymore!

What made the experience of listening to Talking God the most enjoyable?

What made this book enjoyable beyond the story itself was the narration by Christian Baskous. His voice characterizations are amazing. No matter how many different people appear in the narrative, Mr. Baskous creates a distinct and memorable voice for each one. I love this guy. He really makes the familiar stories come alive in totally new ways. This novel was a real departure from the usual Jim Chee/Joe Leaphorn stories. Most of the action takes place in Washington D.C., not New Mexico, and I found that I missed the long drives through the dramatic landscapes of the Southwest that typically fill up the narrative in Hillerman's novels. Having the boys from the Rez solving crime in the Big East was a weird paradigm shift. The book was as good as any of his others, of course, and we did get to see Janet Pete at her flashy, glamorous best in D.C. society. Grave robbers and terrorists make a nice showing in this one - we even get a maladjusted, emotionally damaged hit man stalking the investigation. I credit the excellent narration with bridging the gap between the new territory explored in this story and the more familiar expressions of tribal religious practice and philosophy we have come to expect from Hillerman's novels.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Jim Chee is usually my favorite character in Hillerman's novels. He is the most dynamic of the regulars - Joe Leaphorn reminds me a little too much of my dad - and I find that his struggle to live in harmony with the modern world AND his tribal heritage causes me to admire him quite a bit.

Which character – as performed by Christian Baskous – was your favorite?

So, I like all the characters performed by Christian Baskous, as I mentioned earlier. I especially liked how he handled the odd character of Leroy Fleck, the strange hit man/stalker in the novel. We see his twisted, corrupted little world up close and personal in a couple of long, intense chapters. Mr. Baskous expresses this guy's warped thoughts really, really well. Check out Chapter 16 for a freaky tour through Fleck's inner world. It is not to be missed.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Yes. Spoiler Alert: Janet decides to come home to New Mexico with Jim. Big Romantic Deal, even if the romance is so very discreetly touched on that you might even miss it right there at the end of the book. What can I say? I really think Janet is the right girl for Jim.

Any additional comments?

I did think it was weird to have so much of the action happened outside the usual Navajo stomping grounds. I think the next novel, The Fallen Man, returns the action to its rightful place on the Rez. The departure was ok, but I am really glad Hillerman didn't decide to have Jim move to D.C. to be with Janet. I don't think either one of us can imagine him anywhere but home!

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Jean
  • Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • 01-29-16

A Novel Full of Suspense

Book Review
Talking God by Tony Hillerman
Jean A. Vachon
A Novel Full of Suspense
Wickenburg, Az - Talking God, is the first novel by Tony Hillerman that I have read.
The story, I found, flows quite fluently and is thus quite pleasurable.
At first, one is a bit puzzled by the references to Navaho culture. But this shouldn’t discourage the reader.
As the author admits, these references are not always exact, but they add an element of exotism and originality to the story. They also familiarize the reader with the Navaho culture.
The main characters are Navaho Tribal Police Lieutenant Joe Leaphorn and Navaho officer Jim Chee.
In this book, they are investigating the theft of ancestral bones from a Navaho cemetery and the murder of a Smithsonian Conservatory researcher Henry Highhawk. It turns out that the two crimes are related and make us delve in the Navaho legends and their mysterious gods.
The plot is unpredictable and makes for entertaining reading.
This satisfying listening to an audio book by Tony Hillerman motivated me to explore further this intriguing author by reading some more of his novels.
Thus, I am presently reading, Skinwalkers, which I have bought on the Navaho reserve near Flagstaff in Arizona.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • NOKWISA
  • Garland, Texas, United States
  • 10-29-17

One of my favorites

This ts a great book. Loved it when it came out in print years ago. Mr. Hillerman painted wonderful pictures with words. I saw that land and its people with 'word eyes' long before
i saw them with 'flesh eyes'.
Not all of his books are here but I am reading what is available and seeing everything all over again. The only problem with this one is the narrator. What happened to Geo Guidall!!!!
This is a good mystery and all my old friends are here but I cringe every time this narrator goes into his high squeaky little girl voice.

If you can get past the narrator stay and enjoy but if not then get it in the ebook version. You wont be sorry.
















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eye opening story

If you could sum up Talking God in three words, what would they be?

Enlighten interesting, riveting,

What was one of the most memorable moments of Talking God?

the dancing at the old Hogan

What about Christian Baskous’s performance did you like?

I'm disappointed that they didn't use the same narrator on all the in this series.

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Reader ruined it for me

What did you like best about Talking God? What did you like least?

I have both read and listened to several Hillerman novels and find the cultural<br/> explanations fascinating. The stories are always intriguing. However, this reader and his contrived accents made this book hard to get through.

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bring back Guidall

This is a terrible narrator. George Guidall did a much better job. this guy ribs the story.

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Good story. Wrong narrator.

Would you consider the audio edition of Talking God to be better than the print version?

No.

Would you be willing to try another one of Christian Baskous’s performances?

I would prefer not to, but series' editors decided otherwise. If you want to hear the rest of the series, you're stuck with this narrator.

Any additional comments?

This narrator emotes all over the place, often with a generally sullen overtone. Even descriptions of landscapes are narrated like the hills and clouds are having a bad day. Like other reviewers, I was put off by Baskous' inconsistent attempts at giving the characters unique voices. I don't mind so much the Texican drawl given to the two protagonists, Chee and Leaphorn, but there was no distinction between them, and the drawl appears and disappears at random. <br/><br/>There were times when Baskous' narrative approach didn't distract from the story, but mostly I found it unappealing.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Laurie
  • Boulder, CO, United States
  • 10-22-14

Some good moments, but

As usual, there were vivid characters, but the ending was rushed and not particularly convincing. Lots of interesting potential story points were never developed.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful