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Publisher's Summary

There's a lot you probably don't know about the Buddha. For one, the real Buddha was thin. And before he became the "Enlightened One", he was a pampered prince named Siddhartha. He tried starving himself in his quest for inner peace, but found that extremes brought him no closer to enlightenment. Instead, he sought a "middle way" between unhealthy overindulgence and unrealistic abstinence. The instructions he gave his monks about eating, more than 2,500 years ago, were surprisingly simple.

Fast forward to today. Cutting-edge scientific research tells us something Buddha knew all along: it's not what you eat, but when you eat that's most important. You don't need to follow the latest fads or give up your favorite foods. You just need to remember a few guidelines that Buddha provided - guidelines that, believe it or not, will help you lose weight, feel better, and stop obsessing about food. Sure, Buddha lived before the age of cronuts, but his wisdom and teachings endure, providing us with a sane, mindful approach to eating.

With chapters that ponder questions like "What would Buddha drink?" and "Did Buddha do Crossfit?", Buddha's Diet offers both an attainable and sustainable strategy for achieving weight-loss nirvana.

©2016 Tara Cottrell & Dan Zigmond (P)2016 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

glad I found this book in my Lion's Roar mag

Great book to listen to. I lost 4lbs in 6 days just by eating before 7 pm.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Succeeds as a guide to time-restricted eating

This book contains some valuable content. For me, it succeeds as a diet book, offering a common-sensical guide to the theory and practice of time-restricted eating, filled-out with some discussion of sensible practices for weight management, mindful eating and so on. Then there is a bit at the end about Buddhism that seemed like a digression.

The most valuable content for me is the phased approach to implementing time-restricted eating as a lifestyle, and I consider this very valuable indeed. (The studies on time-restricted eating have been persuasive, but the “just do it” approach is all I’ve encountered, and that was unsustainable for me.) Some engaging presentation of how to time-restricted eating work, and common-sense diet advice—nothing new but nothing that seems off, either, just a relatively relaxed guide to healthful approach to eating. The comments about the Buddha and Buddhism seemed a bit off at times (to this long-time, possibly opinionated Buddhist), but that’s not really the focus of the useful first parts of the book, just an approach to presenting healthful habits. Despite the accessible presentation, most of the content is based on relevant recent science, and the studies are cited in notes for each chapter, a nice resource. There are also nice single-chapter summaries on habits (based on Charles Duhigg’s book), value of meditation and mindfulness practices and other techniques that might help with the behavior modifications needed for most of us to successfully adopt time-restricted eating.

At the end of the book is a brief summary of basic Buddhist beliefs, which seemed a bit odd in a diet book. Few substantive philosophies and religions are well-served by being crammed into a couple of chapters in a book focused on something else, in this case healthful eating practices. Given the diversity of belief based on the Buddhist canon (not acknowledged in this presentation), and extensive scholarship done on both the historical Buddha and the development of various schools of Buddhist thought, one might say there is some distortion here. Again this is probably not the focus of someone selecting a diet book anyway.

The reader had a difficult task. Some animation and expression is needed to hold the reader's attention; sometimes this seemed shrill and overdone, but the presentation was tolerable and helped keep my attention.

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Loved it!

Very useful. Funny. Good data and tips. The narrator was great. I'll definitely try this method and see what happens.

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Sounds Easy

Sounds easy, great rationalizations....may have to do it in baby steps and work up to the 8 hour window.

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    5 out of 5 stars

Very down to Earth, backed by science

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

The book is written with a very realistic tone. The authors make several references to their own personal lives such as being parents, over or under eating in the past, and leading very busy lives. The diet is very simply designed and really consists of being more mindful about food than strict restrictions.

I'm not a Buddhist, but was this book isn't about the religion. There are lots of stories about Buddha, but its presented in the form of ideas that make sense than any attempt at religious conversion. There is also lots of scientific studies referenced to back up the various recommendations. This makes the message accessible to all backgrounds, but I think it's worth highlighting here due to the religious connotations in the title.

What about Pam Ward’s performance did you like?

The narrator did a fantastic job. Very smoothly delivered and it sounded like my Aunt was just having a matter of fact conversation with me. She made the message very accessible.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

There's a whole chapter on cheating on the diet. But it wasn't pushing fear or shame, but rather understanding that people slip, schedules get busy, and there are circumstances out of our control. It was very warm when talking about how to get back on track and how to find the middle ground (which was the common theme).

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

return to effective simplicity

you could probably summarize this book on a sheet of paper, however the additional depth was was much appreciated as i go forward to tell others.

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Will definitely apply

Wow, I love the middle way. I I will definitely put this into practice. I feel it's something that I could actually do for the rest of my life and I love the practical Theory of living. It was a great, simple introduction to Buddha's life. Highly recommend.

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    1 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars

Wrong reader, wrong attitude

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

Having a Buddhist read this

What could Tara Cottrell and Dan Zigmond have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

Not read this story

What didn’t you like about Pam Ward’s performance?

Exaggerated; too much emphasis when it is not necessary. Difficult to hear the story because it's difficult to listen to her overemphasizing the words, tone, story.

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

Not many.

Any additional comments?

The story of Buddha is ancient and these authors are making up a story to sell their book. It's ethically unacceptable to equate Buddha with any dietary regimen. Shame on you! Greed got the best of you!

1 of 4 people found this review helpful