Black City Saint

Narrated by: Joshua Saxon
Length: 10 hrs and 58 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (4 ratings)

$14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

For more than 1600 years, Nick Medea has followed and guarded the Gate that keeps the mortal realm and that of Feirie separate, seeking in vain absolution for the fatal errors he made when he slew the dragon. 

All that while, he has tried and failed to keep the woman he loves from dying over and over. Yet in the 50 years since the night the dragon breathed over the city of Chicago, the Gate has not only remained fixed, but open to the trespasses of the Wyld, the darkest of the Feiriefolk. 

Not only does that mean an evil resurrected from Nick’s own past but also the reincarnation of his lost Cleolinda, a reincarnation destined once more to die. Nick must turn inward to that which he distrusts the most: the dragon...the beast he slew when he was still only Saint George. He must turn to the monster residing in him, now a part of him but ever seeking escape. 

The gang war brewing between Prohibition bootleggers may be the least of his concerns. If Nick cannot prevent an old evil from opening the way between realms, then not only might Chicago face a fate worse than the Great Fire, but so will the rest of the mortal realm.

©2016 Richard A. Knaak (P)2019 David N. Wilson

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    3
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Way before Harry Dresden there was St. George

I loved the imagination and thought that went into the Characters and their backgrounds. The story was riveting. The writer did a great job balancing dialogue and action, backstory and present.
The narrator was equal to the task. He was flawless in the delivery and seemed to really know the book. His characters were distinct and recognizable. Congrats to both Author and narrator very well done.

I received this audiobook free at my request for unbiased review. Thanks!!

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

St George Revived

A great take on an figure if lore. A little Marlow, a little Dresden and a lot of imagination from author makes Nick.
The narrator did an excellent job. His voice is deep and smooth, bringing the characters to life.
This audio was given to me free and I voluntarily gave this review.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

I loved Joshua Saxon's narration!

The story was OK but what kept me listening was Saxon's wonderful voice. I hope he narrates many more books!

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

As always, Richard Knaak does not disappoint!

One part prohibition era detective noir, one part religious mythology, one part gang war action-adventure, and one part unorthodox urban fantasy.

Shaken, not stirred.

And of course, it would not be complete without Knaak's signature style of arranging mysteries and reveals that accelerate as we build toward the climax.

Now, let me talk about the audiobook narrator for a moment.
The majority of Joshua Saxon's work that I've heard has been read predominantly in a British accent, so it was a bit of a surprise to hear this in what is essentially a neutral American accent (or lack thereof).

That said, as always, Saxon's voices are excellently crafted with brilliant accents. His vocal inflections are near perfect, and his tempo changes, while a bit unorthodox, are very effective.

As is my wont, I will largely forego a discussion of the book's plot. There are plenty of other reviews that will go into that.

The first thing to understand is this book is something of an anomaly for me. As a general rule, I'm not fond of first person narratives or urban fantasy.

Now, as anyone who's read the book description should be aware, the main character was once Saint George and the act of killing the Dragon bound the two together.

Being the Dragon-obsessed fantasy nerd that I am, that makes for a combination of characters that I can't help but be fascinated by!

While I did find Nick's internal thoughts (or, more specifically, the type of language in which he thinks them) to be a touch disingenuous (considering his background, I would have expected just a bit more formal speech patterns), he still has an extremely compelling voice and a breadth of experience that makes for an exceptionally intriguing character.

And as one would expect from a Richard Knaak story, every character in the book has a distinct personality with their own quirks and goals, making it very easy to identify with each of them.

Naturally, what you're getting from this story is not your typical urban fantasy. There's no trying to pack it full of literally every supernatural creature imaginable. There are no badass warrior women in leather. There aren't really any flashy spells being cast about willy-nilly. And potentially most of all, there is neither a cocky jackass who's somehow an expert at everything, nor a naive, idiot main character who somehow overcomes the bad guys while trying to learn the most rudimentary magic.

In short, it's different from the typical urban fantasy in all the ways that make me enjoy it and not roll my eyes every two minutes.

There is a ton of really intriguing Christian-mythology-made-real, a brilliantly presented prohibition era Chicago that feels completely real, bootlegger wars and all, and the detective/mystery aspect of the story is as intriguing as any noir detective story.

I normally shy away from stories that involve fae or feirie, as I've come to expect a lot of cliche from them. But here it is presented in a way that I haven't seen before and I can't deny that I really enjoyed that presentation.

This is not a book full of beautiful, tiny, winged fairies, but rather creatures called wyld who reside in a realm (other dimension, from the sound of it) called feirie and almost without exception, they are not nice beings. They are selfish and greedy and ambitious and care little for the destruction of whatever humans might cross their paths. They also come in myriad shapes and sizes, some humanoid and some not. Some attractive and some not.

And somehow Mr Knaak weaves all these disparate elements along with some real history and mythology into a beautifully told tale that I didn't want to stop reading!

And once more in true Richard Knaak fashion, the ending comes together in a brilliant tapestry of Epicness that keeps escalating and improving on itself until you can't imagine what might be coming next.

And when at last you do get to that final, epic conclusion...
Well, I really couldn't have asked for more.

A brilliant story with a brilliant conclusion and I can't wait for the audio production of book two!

I absolutely recommend this book for any fan of urban fantasy who might be tired of the constantly rehashed tropes.

But I also strongly recommend it to readers who don't normally enjoy urban fantasy. This is enough of a departure from the norm to please almost any fantasy reader.

1 person found this helpful

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Suzi Baker
  • Suzi Baker
  • 02-18-20

Brilliant!

The narration is masterful, storytelling at its best which vividly brought the story and characters to life. I particularly loved the relationship between Nick and his inner companion. I also came to really care about some of the supporting characters, particularly Fetch and Kravayik but also Alejandro Cortez. Less so Claryce but I think that was probably as much to do with how the character was written - despite her obvious skills and strong personality she was more like an object, a pawn.

The story itself was great. I'd strongly recommend this audiobook.