Regular price: $34.94

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

Comparing Google to an ordinary business is like comparing a rocket to an Edsel. No academic analysis or bystander's account can capture it. Now Doug Edwards, Employee Number 59, offers the first inside view of Google, giving listeners a chance to fully experience the bizarre mix of camaraderie and competition at this phenomenal company.

Edwards, Google's first director of marketing and brand management, describes it as it happened. We see the first, pioneering steps of Larry Page and Sergey Brin, the company's young, idiosyncratic partners; the evolution of the company's famously nonhierarchical structure (where every employee finds a problem to tackle or a feature to create and works independently); the development of brand identity; the races to develop and implement each new feature; and the many ideas that never came to pass. Above all, Edwards - a former journalist who knows how to write - captures the Google Experience, the rollercoaster ride of being part of a company creating itself in a whole new universe.

I'm Feeling Lucky captures for the first time the unique, self-invented, yet profoundly important culture of the world's most transformative corporation.

©2011 Douglas Edwards (P)2011 Audible, Inc.

Critic Reviews

"This lively, thoughtful business memoir is more entertaining than it really has any right to be, and should be required reading for startup aficionados." (Publishers Weekly)
"Douglas Edwards is indeed lucky, sort of an accidental millionaire, a reluctant bystander in a sea of computer geniuses who changed the world. This is a rare look at what happened inside the building of the most important company of our time." (Seth Godin)
"Douglas Edwards recounts Google's stumble and rise with verve and humor and a generosity of spirit. He kept me turning the pages of this engrossing tale." (Ken Auletta, author of Googled: The End of the World as We Know It)
“With a warm, approachable tone and perfect pacing, Edwards narrates his detailed account of his experiences as an early employee of Google, Inc….Edwards seems a natural as he provides a highly listenable audio performance….the listener walks away with a better understanding of how true organizational creativity and brilliant technical engineering can impact the human condition and world culture.” (AudioFile)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    591
  • 4 Stars
    537
  • 3 Stars
    204
  • 2 Stars
    50
  • 1 Stars
    23

Performance

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    523
  • 4 Stars
    424
  • 3 Stars
    165
  • 2 Stars
    31
  • 1 Stars
    21

Story

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    515
  • 4 Stars
    412
  • 3 Stars
    174
  • 2 Stars
    41
  • 1 Stars
    17
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Michael
  • Victoria, BC, Canada
  • 03-11-12

Early Days of Google -- First Hand

This book provides insider details on how key decisions were made in the early Google days. There is a high volume of source material that outsiders will have trouble finding. The marketing perspective on this engineer-run company is especially interesting. At the beginning, the sarcastic voice inflections are overdone, but about 20% of the way through, that settles down. The writing is excellent and overall, the reading is well done. If you're interested in technology breakthroughs or Google, this book is highly recommended.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Great story but are you chewing on something?

How could the performance have been better?

Did he have a mint in his mouth the whole time? He kept getting a little slurpy. It kinda turned my stomach a few times.

Any additional comments?

It's a great story about how some extremely smart people built a great company.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Makes you want to join a Silicon Valley start-up

What made the experience of listening to I'm Feeling Lucky the most enjoyable?

What made it great was that the writer narrated the book, so it sounded so real.

What did you like best about this story?

Getting the inside scoop on Google.

What does Douglas Edwards bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Himself and his reaction to the experience.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

His jumping from the stability of his prior job to join this odd start-up. Turns out he picked the right one.

Any additional comments?

Well done. Bought the Kindle as well.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Fantastic Read

Any additional comments?

What a fascinating, charming story. It is so well told, it inspired me to take a Python programming class.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • N
  • 01-11-12

It was hard to stop listening.

A fascinating look into Google, done in an honest and fair way. I don't "talk tech" so there were things that I didn't exactly understand but that never took away from the story. It's easy to see why Google is so popular!

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • David
  • Hamilton, NJ, United States
  • 12-13-11

Well written but too high on self-pomotion

Would you try another book from Douglas Edwards and/or Douglas Edwards?

No

What was most disappointing about Douglas Edwards’s story?

The sad part of this book is that the author - who writes very well - took what could have been a real insider's look at the beginnings of Google and turned it into a book mostly about how HE specifically impacted it. Regardless of how amusing, insightful, or entertaining each individual story could have been, the author manages to somehow selfishly bring each and every one around to see exactly what impact he had on it, rather than focusing on the story itself, the other major players involved, and overall try to give us some objective, fun peak into Google. In fact, the entire book actually has an undertone of sarcastic resentment towards the engineers (including the founders Page and Sergei) and basically everyone that

How did the narrator detract from the book?

The author somehow managed to read most of the book with an undertone of sarcastic resentment for most others that were making decisions and fueling the engine of Google.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Terry
  • San Francisco, CA, United States
  • 12-04-11

Better Than Expected

Quite a bit better than I expected - I am not typically a fan of business books. For instance, even though I earn a living via Google, I have never read Battelle's book on Google. But I loved this book. Great writing, and I thought it was very broad in scope. It's not just about marketing, or product, or user experience, or Larry or Eric., etc. It's about all of that, and told in such a compelling way - definitely highly recommend this audiobook.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Bill
  • san jose, CA, United States
  • 11-27-11

Far fetched

At first I had doubts to read a book of a former employee who was apparently fired. But I decided to give it a try.
Then after about an hour of listening, I had to turn it off.
The author is an English major, yet he attributes to himself the design of the Google homepage. He's not a coder, not an engineer, yet he manages to override Sergey Brin and Larry Page in the final design decision? He himself says Sergey micromanages every detail in the company.
Another huge red flag of inflated facts is when he describes Sergey insisted that Google had an infinitely scrolling page, but the author argues against it and Google finally had "pages" instead.
Another red flag of fictitious facts, is that he was arguing for Google to have a Sans Serif font in the results. I mean, this is all laughable. You would have to be a very naive person to believe any of this.
He also mentions that Sergey and Page wanted to make the Google home page hot pink.
I wouldn't waste my time listening.
There's probably some facts here and there, but why waste my time trying to guess what's BS and what's true. A journalist should be impartial and present only facts.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Joseph
  • Valley Stream, NY, United States
  • 11-22-11

An inside look

If you want to know about Google itself, this book is pretty good - but if you want to know what it was like to work there, then this book is a must read.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Douglas
  • New York, NY, United States
  • 11-13-11

A First-Hand Look into the Growth of Google

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes, excellent story and voice, especially since the author himself is narrating the book.

What did you like best about this story?

That it's true, and the author was narrating.

What about Douglas Edwards’s performance did you like?

That the listener could tell when Edwards was passionate about the subject or the topic, and parts where he was less enthusiastic or even disappointed (with the real-life result). It felt more like he was talking to me, rather than an audiobook.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

Laugh at moments. The story was very humanizing, one can tell when the author was happy, slighted, angry, and/or disappointed.

Any additional comments?

Great for anyone who is interested in the tech world.