• Blood, Sweat, and Pixels

  • The Triumphant, Turbulent Stories Behind How Video Games Are Made
  • By: Jason Schreier
  • Narrated by: Ray Chase
  • Length: 7 hrs and 58 mins
  • 4.7 out of 5 stars (5,338 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Developing video games - hero's journey or fool's errand? The creative and technical logistics that go into building today's hottest games can be more harrowing and complex than the games themselves, often seeming like an endless maze or a bottomless abyss. In Blood, Sweat, and Pixels, Jason Schreier takes listeners on a fascinating odyssey behind the scenes of video game development, where the creator may be a team of 600 overworked underdogs or a solitary geek genius. Exploring the artistic challenges, technical impossibilities, marketplace demands, and Donkey Kong-size monkey wrenches thrown into the works by corporate, Blood, Sweat, and Pixels reveals how bringing any game to completion is more than Sisyphean - it's nothing short of miraculous.

Taking some of the most popular, best-selling recent games, Schreier immerses listeners in the hellfire of the development process, whether it's RPG studio Bioware's challenge to beat an impossible schedule and overcome countless technical nightmares to build Dragon Age: Inquisition; indie developer Eric Barone's single-handed efforts to grow country-life RPG Stardew Valley from one man's vision into a multimillion-dollar franchise; or Bungie spinning out from their corporate overlords at Microsoft to create Destiny, a brand-new universe that they hoped would become as iconic as Star Wars and Lord of the Rings - even as it nearly ripped their studio apart.

Documenting the round-the-clock crunches, buggy-eyed burnout, and last-minute saves, Blood, Sweat, and Pixels is a journey through development hell - and ultimately a tribute to the dedicated diehards and unsung heroes who scale mountains of obstacles in their quests to create the best games imaginable.

©2017 Jason Schreier (P)2017 HarperCollins Publishers

What listeners say about Blood, Sweat, and Pixels

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Behind the Scenes

The stories in this book are:

1. Pillars of Eternity: How crowdfunding changes the rules, and changes the priorities of the developer who promised backers certain gameplay features, against deadlines and a limited budget. This story provides a better understanding of the benefits and drawbacks of crowdfunding.
2. Uncharted 4: How too much success affects a studio, and how to successfully end a successful series. It is also the story of The Last of Us, which nobody expected to be successful early on. I enjoyed all the possibilities of how different this game could have been.
3. Stardew Valley: The great risks and heartwarming payoff of going solo. The ending made me want to play this game.
4. Diablo 3: The troubles of online-only games, and the angst and pressures of racing against time to meet player expectations. In the end, it is a success story that had a lot of challenges and frustrations along the way.
5. Halo Wars: How games are transformed in the middle of development, and the pressures of working against a deadline. The Age of Empires developers are behind Halo Wars. Who knew?
6. Dragon Age: Inquisition: How EA corporate politics and poor can slow down game development and creates a large degree of developer frustration. After reading this, I have a better understanding of why EA is a blight on video games.
7. Shovel Knight: The quest to create an iconic character inspired by classic NES games and characters. It provides an insider look into an indie game team and the challenges they face.
8. Destiny: The challenges of combining multiple genres and trying to create something that's never been done before, and how past successes tend to dictate what the next success would look like. It is also the story of how a developer matures.
9. The Witcher 3: The reason for the volume and quality of content is revealed, in one of the most fascinating and enjoyable chapters of this audiobook.
10. Star Wars 1313: How a game that can do no wrong ends up being buried due to corporate politics. Delayed because of Disney and canceled outright by EA, this is the game that makes you wonder, what if? Also, f*ck EA.

164 people found this helpful

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Ray Chase is great!

I'm glad I purchased the audio version of this book because listening to Ray Chase was a delight. Having a voice actor of video games narrate a book on video games was a solid choice.

Overall, the book was a nice slice of various company's descent into and occasionally ascent from the madness of producing video games. The anecdotes are both humbling and harrowing and are sure to make game fans think twice when they criticize a game. As noted, with all the moving parts and preferences, it's miracle any game gets made.

Worth the read, or preferably, the listen, if you are a fan of or just curious about video games and their production.

27 people found this helpful

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great look at an industry stuck in a cycle

overall the book is a great look at the making of some great video games, as well as some great failures.

I couldn't help but notice, however, that even as the author spoke about the unhealthy practices of video game labor management it was almost romanticized to a degree, like video game developers needed to be these pioneer souls that are willing to sacrifice their health and even family to make a game-- rather than what is true, which is that it's an industry rife with labor exploitation.

I'm less speaking on the indie devs who chose to use their time for their passions and more the multiple triple a studios that rely on insane expectations as a matter of course. The scientific literature isn't sparse on the subject of labor, rest, efficiency, and productivity and those mentioned in the book that couldn't see how a game gets done without months of crunch are simply stuck in a cultural spiral. Ignoring rote science in favor of anecdotal "experience" is sadly the norm in a lot of big industries, and those with the checkbook are happy to support this culture of exploitation.

Regardless, it is a very good book with inspiring stories describing passionate people. I just hope industry insiders who read it begin to realize that major changes need to happen within the industry to stop incredibly unhealthy practices and incredibly damaging exploitation.

21 people found this helpful

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You want to work in gaming :)

Thoroughly enjoyable and page-turning read that paints an honest and at times horrifying picture of the world of video game development.

The author details real-life stories and experiences from multiple games and various game studios, with the same names occasionally popping up in multiple stories. The attributable quotes and stories definitely add substantial authenticity to the book.

The book not only highlights the passion and love that many in gaming have, but for me, the true highlight is the amazing dedication that those workers have - it’s both inspirational and crazy, on occasions to their own detriment.

I’d consider this a must-read for anyone working in the video games industry or anyone who considers them a gamer.

I finished this book with a plethora of games I now want to play, several of them new to me.

ggwp to the author, great writing and superb book.

10 people found this helpful

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Great inside look into the gaming industry

What did you love best about Blood, Sweat, and Pixels?

As someone who has played video games since their childhood, and flirted with the prospect of maybe one day making video games, Blood, Sweat, and Pixels is a fantastic look inside a variety of studios as they worked through development of their titles. I loved that the author interviewed developers from different grades of studios; from the one-man indie developer all the way to AAA game studios. It offers a great answer to why video games cost so much money, and why they take so long to make. I would offer this up to anyone that wants to get into the industry, on any level.

What did you like best about this story?

My favorite segment/chapter was probably the one on Star Wars 1313 as it told the story of how that game came to be, and why it disappeared. It was heart wrenching, but also somewhat inevitable with how Lucas Arts was run once upon a time.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I listened to this book while doing my weekly running, and always found myself wanting to continue listening, which pushed me to run just a little bit more.

Any additional comments?

My only negative, and it is a good negative to have I guess, is that I wish there were more chapters. It was amazing to hear how the different studios approached their problems, and how some of them made the same mistakes as others did (i.e. Destiny and Diablo 3). I just wanted more in the end.

6 people found this helpful

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Excellent look at the industry behind the fun

As great as Masters of Doom is, and it really is great, it doesn't capture the real life experience of the video game industry as a whole. Blood Sweat and Pixels does exactly this with 10 examples of well known games and their grueling paths through development hell. I recommend this book to anyone interested in how the digital sausage is made. And I think it should be mandatory reading for anyone considering going into this industry.

5 people found this helpful

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Not compelling or useful, unfortunately.

I'm a game developer and executive (and a gamer), so I was excited about this book, and had high hopes that it would be educational and/or anecdotally entertaining. Sadly, while it provided a little bit of insight into the game dev industry and a few development studios -assuming you know essentially nothing about that world- it lacks anything professionally useful or literarily compelling. While the reader does a great job, I honestly couldn't tell you why the author felt the need to write this. He doesn't say anything ridiculous or even -in my opinion- wrong, he's just reporting what happened in a pretty blend manner.
HOWEVER, I'll stay this... If you know very little about the game development industry and are considering pursuing it as a career, it does provide a candid and generally accurate glimpse into the industry and what it's like to work at some of the studios making today's high-end game titles. That said, if this describes you... you'll probably find yourself a bit discouraged by this book - It doesn't paint a particularly alluring picture.

9 people found this helpful

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A must read, truly.

If you love video games, this should be the first book you read about them.

4 people found this helpful

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A compilation of modern "gossip" gaming "journalis

The book starts really, really good. But then you start noticing it tends to a side that breaks the quality of the content. It always focuses on the "evil" corporations, while never saying not a single word against Sony or even Activision but punching EA and MS as if these were the only greedy ones.

When it talks about Destiny, it chooses to forget to report very consumer unfriendly like PlayStation exclusive content cut from Xbox and pc versions.

The book misses the opportunity to show the other side, the games that would never exist without a big publisher behind like Sunset Overdrive, Titanfall, Horizon and even Ico.

Overall I feel the book is very biased and extends to much into small chit chat talk that does not bring much of the real deal of game development, a few chapters are really good, like Shovel Knight, Uncharted and Witcher, but overall the book has not enough content and is unfairly biased.

17 people found this helpful

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A collection of random stories

This book is a collection of random stories that happen to share in common the fact that they are stories about famous games. Other than that I don’t see any other common thread that structures the book.

While I liked to learn a bit more about those stories, I didn’t like the fact that the stories like more like a succession of events, lacking a bit of story telling to make each story more fluid.

I would recommend this book to big fans of any of the games whose story appears here, but other than that I don’t see much interest.

6 people found this helpful

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  • XopsX
  • 08-01-18

an accurate picture of how games are made

No game is simple to make. these 10 stories showcase some of the ups and downs of videogame development and how familiar they all start to sound. I have a feeling this book will mostly appeal to game developers like myself who have a ton of similar experiences to reference. For anyone outside the industry it may be harder to get into or comprehend why we do it. I think this book does an accurate job at capturing that.

3 people found this helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Trevor P. Johnson
  • 09-22-20

Could do with technical detail

I thought it might reveal a little about how video games are actually made, ie the vast technical feat of making a game like Red Dead, but it only touches on these in generalisms. Mainly it's about corporate politics, which become repetitive after the first few case studies. I did finish it, however.





1 person found this helpful

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  • Gravious
  • 01-13-20

Interesting, Informative and Well Written

Jason Schreier is well known for his terrific games journalism, a veritable professional with an eye for detail and a nose for dirt. This book provides a somewhat sugary overview of the development of a number of well known and interesting projects, but does a great job of entertaining and informing you of the twists and turns of development. Well narrated by Ray Chase, this is an easy listen and worthy of attention.

1 person found this helpful

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  • N A
  • 11-16-18

modern game development

a big focus on role-playing games, showing how games can end up in development hell. mainly outside forces which influence games such as the lucas arts example. first choice Lucas messing with the plot and character and then Lucas art being bought by Disney. but usually it is just a lack of actual focus on what the game will be. it seems like developers say ok let's make a game like unity but in the Star wars world. there isn't a clear idea of how the game will end up so when they realise they need to make changes a lot of the previous work gets thrown out. also having the right tools to develop their games seems very important such as the example of bungie. maybe would have like to see a little bit more of the personalities show through of the people developing the games. the most gripping examples were those with specific people who were described like the guy who did Star dew valley. that was the most gripping story of all.

1 person found this helpful

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  • O Clegg
  • 07-26-18

Great insight into the behind the scenes of gaming

Loved it! As a gamer you never really understand the politics and drama going on in the background within a gaming studio. Good listen would definitely recommend.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Anonymous User
  • 06-24-22

Hugely interesting

If you have been a gamer in the past 15 years (2000s - 2015), you will find this book interesting.

Hearing the roundabout methods studios used to produce some of the biggest games ever is hugely interesting, and the insight provided on key decisions that had previously led gamers scratching their heads is revealed in this book.

It’s not a technical book for video game developers if that’s what you’re looking for, but I found it thoroughly enjoyable all the same. Almost listened to it all in one sitting - actually had to pace myself to avoid doing so

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  • JOHNNYDONCASTER
  • 10-14-21

Not a boring moment

Great insight into the struggles and achievements of the gaming industry. Well written and well spoken.

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Colin H
  • 07-23-21

Great book, lively narration

Really eye-opening book that covers a lot of ground. Fascinating to hear how different- and yet how similar- games development can be. The narrator does a good job of bringing the book to life, although I did find his pronunciation of certain words annoying at times ("nawdee darg" was especially grating) but overall he does a good job.

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  • Ashley slocombe
  • 07-13-21

Insightful

Loved this book, interesting stories of how some of my favourite games were made and the struggles the development team went through.

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  • Mikkel Reed
  • 05-31-21

From the insider Jason

Good read.
Because each chapter is a different story that fits in.
therefore does cover a lot, but it's still too short. (:

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  • Annabelle
  • 12-30-20

Amazing

Loved every minute, super interesting and well written. Great narration and great stories! Thank you!!!

1 person found this helpful

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  • Daniel
  • 07-18-22

Good insight into the industry

Well written and broken up into studios/games that helped to showcase unique and common challenges and setbacks in the world of game development.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 02-10-22

Extremely well written developer stories

This was an extremely well written book containing about 10 stories regarding the turbulent development of popular video games. Jason's writing is extremely engaging and easy to listen to and you can see why he's one of the gaming industry's best journalists.

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  • Marcus Howard
  • 01-11-22

A definitive truth behind the games we love.

Blood, Sweat and Pixels is the forefront of investigative journalism in the video game industry, like every industry on Earth Blood, Sweat and Pixels shows that this industry is far from innocent and it too has its dark moments. Jason Schreier does an amazing job explaining his witness to some of the more significant behind the scenes stories in the industry, from personal accounts of the Devs behind the games they're making to creative direction that challenges the studios and the money making boards behind the decisions that often lead to a worse game than visioned.

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  • Daniel B
  • 12-14-21

Great Look at the Gaming Industry

Jason Schreier provides some of the best games journalism and this book is no exception. As gamers we sometimes undervalue the effort that goes into game development and this book shines a light on what happens to get them across the finish line. Both for indie games and triple A titles.

A must read for Gamers.

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  • Hamish B
  • 11-28-21

Bland

What should be fascinating stories of the greatest art form of our age are instead a series of rushed, simplistic stories, devoid of compelling narrative.

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Kindle Customer
  • 07-04-21

well written

This is a well written book but it glorifies "crunch", or overworking, a bit too much. I feel that in this sense Jason Schreier is not critical enough of overworking and seems to portray it too positively, as if it is inevitable. Other than that, these are a collection of great stories of the develop of great games big and small from Witcher 3 to Stardew Valley. Highly recommended

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  • Oliver
  • 06-27-21

really informative and interesting

a great window into the games industry and the stories you don't normally get to hear about big games that are in the world

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  • Anonymous User
  • 02-07-20

Entertaining and enjoyable but a bit shallow

I really enjoyed listening to the audiobook. The writer is always enjoyable and easy to follow. The book is split up into individual games. The only problem is I eventually found myself a bit bored by one story after another and would have liked more depth given to the issues raised, like publishers vs crowd funding, game financing, crunch, and what the career more broadly is like

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  • Rhett Leech
  • 01-28-20

Very interesting collection of developer interviews

As a corporate software developer is was extremely interesting to hear the same issues scheduling, unclear management and shifting priorities extend to other like companies.

Structuring each chapter as a separate game provided a natural break point.