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Publisher's Summary

In the first part of this two-part work, the economics of higher education are explained. It is made clear how a university’s business model differs from that of a company that has to compete on the open market.

On this basis, it is explained:

  • Why universities are in no way threatened by low retention-rates and graduation-rates
  • Why universities cannot significantly improve or otherwise alter the quality of their educational services without imperiling their very existences
  • Why universities do not have to improve the quality of their educational services
  • Why universities couldn’t improve the quality of their services even if they wanted to
  • Why the fact that many universities have low retention and graduation-rates does not a represent a business opportunity, or opportunity of any other kind, for anyone, whether inside or outside of academia
  • Why principles of knowledge management (KM) that are so useful when it comes to helping businesses that compete on the open market are completely useless, and indeed of negative utility, when it comes to helping universities solve their problems.

In the second part of this work, it is explained how to construct an online university that is both lucrative and also provides instruction that is faster, better, cheaper, and more useful than the instruction provided by any existing (or possible) brick-and-mortar university. Finally, it is explained how the principles of KM can be used to optimize such a university, once it is up and running.

©2019 John-Michael Kuczynski (P)2019 John-Michael Kuczynski

What listeners say about The Economics of Higher Education in the 21st Century

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Very logical and practical approach to education

The author clearly and in great detail--but always entertainingly--talks about how to digitize education, thereby keeping prices low and quality of instruction high. The author claims to have figured out a way to cut tuition costs by a factor of 20 while improving instruction. And I think he's right.

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Opinion. Unsubstantiated claims.

Part 1 is is pure garbage full of unsubstantiated proclamations ready for ingestion by illogical and gullible readers. Part 2 has a few observations and ideas that barely qualify this “book” to be printed. Lastly, for the title to incorporate the word “Economics” is a massive disservice to all economists everywhere.

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Overly Generalize With A Few Take Aways

Full of a lot of unsubstantiated claims. The digital prescription, combined with an open access vision fails the realism test when applied to lower income populations who may lack access to computers and other technologies necessary to be effective using this model. There are some interesting take sways though.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 06-04-20

the truth about higher education

a totally accurate, totally sober critique of higher education, and a very detailed, and easy to implement, blue print for an alternative. i am a tad surprised at the bitterness with which this volume has been received, given how sane (not to mention witty) it is. the point, as the author says, is--digitize in order to economize. and he steps the reader through it. i'd love to see this implemented, given my own whopping tuition-costs. apparently, not everybody is on board. to each his own.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 11-01-20

covid-relevant analysis

the author talks about automating education and has some quite detailed thoughts on the matter. very relevant to covid situation, even though it was published in the year 1 pc (pre-covid).