Regular price: $23.07

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

Few of us realize how many states of consciousness we pass through on a regular basis. In this entertaining guide, Jeff Warren explores 12 distinct, natural states we can experience in a 24-hour day, each offering its own kind of knowledge, insight, and adventure.
©2007 Jeff Warren (P)2007 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    47
  • 4 Stars
    32
  • 3 Stars
    21
  • 2 Stars
    11
  • 1 Stars
    3

Performance

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    13
  • 4 Stars
    12
  • 3 Stars
    5
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    2

Story

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    18
  • 4 Stars
    12
  • 3 Stars
    4
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    1
Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Roy
  • Beaumont, TX, United States
  • 04-12-09

Give the Early Chapters Time

In this text, Warren takes listeners through the various states of human consciousness devoting a chapter to each. I look for books that inform and are read well. This one did not disappoint. It took me a little time to get into the topic, but once the listener comes to an understanding of the author's intent and method, everything else falls into place.

Readers may think that the author is on something when reading portions of the book. However, I found interesting things to consider every few minutes. I was particularly taken by the authors explanation of how creative people (Edison for example) actually were able to retrieve insights from their light sleep. It was also helpful to understand the role sleep plays in how people learn. Ths discussion on spacial learning and experience of the blind was eye opening (pardon the pun). (The ramifications for students who get by with little rest would have helped me in graduate school for sure!).

This is a highly instructive, informative, entertaining volume that will keep you thinking about the world in a different way for many weeks.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

Slowed it down

Although the content is good, I was having a problem with the high speed reading. Using the -1 setting on my iriver solved the problem and I enjoyed this very much. A nice update on what has been going in studies on consciousness. I was particularly interested to hear about the new, more sophisticated methods of biofeedback.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Greg
  • Lansing, MI, USA
  • 11-14-08

5 star writing

2 star demerit for manic and odd cadence of the narrator. This was an annoying listen; but a book well worth reading. Go paper on this one.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Very interesting topic

I disagree about the narrator. He definetly talks quickly (which takes some getting used to) but he is also pretty funny, and makes it interesting.

The content was great! It was very interesting and I havent read a book yet that is much like that. It has a very different style and unique content.

It was definetly worth the listen.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

informative

Answers a lot of questions I have always wondered about. If you are interested in the mind you can not miss this one.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Me
  • 04-05-18

The book is great but listen at .85 speed

It's definitely an exploration of both real science and stuff a little on the edge of reasonable, so it's best seen as a compilation of many interviews and opinions. It's better if you're curious and ready to look stuff up but Jeff Warren definitely looks into some of the more underappreciated and important parts of our everyday experience.

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Not the best

Given that the book is crammed with lingo the speed of the performance was A awful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

A lot of fascinating content!

Warren is not an amazing writer, and I don't like the framing of the book. But there's enough good stuff in here to justify a listen.

You might expect this to be a pretty hokey book: hypnosis, lucid dreaming, brain waves, biofeedback. A lot of it has a weird new-agey reputation. But that's exactly the point: there's perfectly good science behind all of this, even if many of the practitioners don't know it. To take one example: Warren goes to one of the world's foremost hypnotists, a man in his 80s (I think, it's been a little while since I finished the book) who used to be a university psychology researcher. He demos hypnosis very effectively and explains the simple relationship between easily measured brain waves and subjective consciousnesses.

Again, this is not a perfect book--too much of it is Warren self-indulgently reporting his experiences doing things like lucid dreaming seminars in Hawaii--but I don't know of a better one right now for explaining brain states. If you like Radiolab type stuff, give this book a try.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

Excellent Content...Terrible Narrator

the content of the book allowed me to ignore the terrible narration. Mr. Todd reminded me of the guy who announces summary of the stock market in 20 seconds or less. like he was in a race to finish reading the book. everyone once in while he'd fall into a comfortable cadence, but more often not.

with a different narrator this book would get 5 stars from me. the author has a unique way about explaining the subjective experience in a way that is both helpful and highly entertaining.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

a guide to the mind

a little long winded in places, overall intresting. this is a different aproach to a book about the brain. rather that talking about how the different areas of the brain are responsible for various tasks, this book talks about how the mind works as a whole. what's going on when you are in different states of mind. what's going on to make those states of mind unique. worth a credit if you're a budding armchair neurologist like me :)