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Publisher's Summary

The Witcher returns in this action-packed sequel to The Tower of Swallows, in the New York Times best-selling series that inspired The Witcher video games.

After walking through the portal in the Tower of Swallows while narrowly escaping death, Ciri finds herself in a completely different world...an Elven world. She is trapped, with no way out. Time does not seem to exist, and there are no obvious borders or portals to cross back into her home world.

But this is Ciri, the child of prophecy, and she will not be defeated. She knows she must escape to finally rejoin the Witcher, Geralt, and his companions - and also to try to conquer her worst nightmare. Leo Bonhart, the man who chased, wounded, and tortured Ciri, is still on her trail. And the world is still at war.

Translated from the original Polish by David French.

©2017 Andrzej Sapkowski (P)2017 Hachette Audio

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.7 out of 5.0
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Performance

  • 4.9 out of 5.0
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Story

  • 4.6 out of 5.0
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I don't know

For me this has to be the worst of the Witcher book. Worst not meaning a bad read but the most disjointed and difficult to follow. None the less a good end.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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Terrible

The story is disjointed and hard to fallow, it has almost nothing to do with Geralt, Ciri or Yennifer. 90% of the story focus' on minor characters that where introduced in the first book or short stories, and events that have nothing to do with anything. It seems that Sapkowski ran out of ideas for the main protagonists and focus of all the books and short stories and so cobbled together a bunch of half thought out boring short stories that nobody would be interested in by themselves to pad out the the book. You can easily skip hours and loose nothing of the story, in fact if you only read the parts that involve Geralt, Ciri or Yennifer you would get a better experience and save yourself 15+ hours of boring padding.

8 of 9 people found this review helpful

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Didn't like the end

I was so looking forward to the conclusion to the series and was disappointed with the ending. I also got confused.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Edward
  • Brunswick, Ohio, United States
  • 04-06-17

Disjointed mess

Not sure if translation was off. The story was there it just was all over the place. Enjoyed the other books this one was a mess

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

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I constantly find myself saying poor Ciri!

What did you love best about The Lady of the Lake?

I'm afraid if I met her in the real world, I'd accidentally kill her via smothering from hugging her so hard. I've always sympathized for her in the other stories, but with the stakes at an all time high in the series finale. and Peter Kenny's fantastic voice narration, I have never felt closer to the action.Andrzej Sapkowski once again proves that he can write an engaging story that involves truly complex themes. And he tells the story in a Quentin Tarantino like way that makes you have to wait until you reach the end before you can have a full understanding of all of the events that have taken place. And even with the ending, you still are left puzzled wondering what exactly it means to have the elder blood and what Ciri is truly capable of.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Lady of the Lake?

When Geralt and his companions stormed Vilgevortz's fortress in an attempt to rescue Ciri and Yennifer. Geralt and Yennifer take on Vilgevortz while Ciri has a showdown with Bonhart.

What does Peter Kenny bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

What's funny is, at first, I didn't like Kenny's voice. It sounded so weird and was not what I expected it to be. Yet somehow, his accent which sounds somewhat Irish to me, worked really well for characters like Geralt, Dandelion, Regis, Vilgevortz, and many other side characters. Naturally, didn't work very well for the majority of the female characters and especially ones that spoke in a high-pitched voice such as Francesca Findabair and he was even worse when he tried to be sassy with female characters like Yennifer or Fringilla. However, somehow his best voice was for Cirilla of Vengerberg, daughter of Yennefer.Somehow, he was able to not only replicate a convincing female voice for her, but one that represented vulnerability, naiveness, and one that was also very defiant and would do anything to be back with the ones that she loved. You can't help but root for her the entire time. And there was a point in the book where Peter Kenny speaks as Ciri in a weeping tone that was so convincing, that I was nearly brought to tears. A very moving performance.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

When Ciri stood up to the lodge proclaiming Yennifer to be her mother and she called Geralt her dad.

Any additional comments?

This book is confusing. It has a bizarre ending, and the politics is an intriguing jumbled mess that could have been done without. But the overall story of Ciri, Geralt and his companions, and Yennifer is top notch and makes for a grand finish to this epic seven book series. Well worth the listen!

4.5 out of 5 stars. Take out some of the politics and a couple of the non-important side character story-arcs and this is easily one of the best books that I have ever read.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Really fun listen if you play Witcher 3!

Jumps around a lot and the author make Ciri a complete brat that has no backbone and that is not the Ciri from Witcher 3! but it is still a fun listen.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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amazing

Great book. Had so much fun with this listen. Peter Kenny is great as always. This book does have a few long chapters of political discourse that may warrant some to skip a bit. I gave it 4 out of five because of that fact. Otherwise, this contained two of my favorite moments in the witcher saga. Any fan will love this book but this should not be the first one you hear.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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all over the place

was somewhat confusing jumping between so many different characters, and not so straightforward. love the games, and this does fill in back story

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Sad it's over

A fitting end to a great series. Filled with happy and sad parts. Something ends...

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A satisfying conclusion to an epic series

So, after so long I've finally completed this saga of The Witcher novels. There is one other Witcher novel in print, but unfortunately it has no English translation, but that should be happening next year.

The thing that I was worried about with much of this series is that I had certain questions about the lore of The Witcher series (based on only having played The Witcher 3 PC game before) and I wanted to know if those questions were going to get answered. I've since learned that some of the questions I have were part of The Witcher video game series and not the books, so I'll be revisiting those, but this series did answer other questions I had about the lore. For one thing, Ciri's parentage is finally explained, and you learn about the nature of her powers to go between worlds and why it's so damn important to everyone.

Looking back now on the novels compared to the video games, I can see just how much CD Projeckt Red differed from the books with their games. The characters and their personalities are all intact and absolutely spot on to the way they're portrayed in the novels, but certain aspects of the world do seem to be portrayed differently in the games as opposed to the books.

For this book though, as an end to the series, it sort of has a long, slow burn beginning, and then culminates in this gigantic fiery clash about 3/4 of the way through. I was actually surprised that this seemed to be the climax of the novel because when I was listening to it, the novel still had six more hours of audio left to go, and I thought (there's no way they're wrapping things up already.)

The way it rolls out is after the big epic confrontation at that point in the book, (and it really is a quite satisfying climax) the book switches gears for, what I consider to be a rather lengthy epilogue which takes up about the last quarter of the book.

The major plot points of the saga, that is Ciri's parentage, destiny, safety, etc. are all addressed and wrapped up rather neatly. And if you're wondering, yes there is a confrontation with Vilgefortz and other big bad guys in the series.

Also, I must say, that Sapkowski's habit of having various narrators and perspectives actually seems to make more sense in this one, with the various narrators actually tying into the main plot overall.

Overall, this is a very satisfying conclusion to the series. Now, this is a spoiler, so watch out, but one thing I do want to mention is that at the very, very end of the novel, there is a very ambiguous section about the fate of Geralt and Yennifer. Now, if you consider the games to be part of the overall Witcher lore (which I do) then it's not as impactful, but if you consider only the books to be canon, then the final section of the novel would probably infuriate you, because it's this incredibly ambiguous sequence, which leaves the end fate of Geralt and Yennifer completely up in the air.


Much like The Witcher 3 which got me started on this whole franchise, I can say that this book series has been a wild ride. It's drawn me in even more, and now I'm playing the other Witcher video games that I hadn't considered before, in order to delve deeper into the lore, and also just because I don't want to leave the world of The Witcher just yet either.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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