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Publisher's Summary

Did the historical person Jesus really regard himself as the Son of God? What did Jesus actually stand for? And what are we to make of the early Christian conviction that Jesus physically rose from the dead?

In this book, N. T. Wright considers these and many other questions raised by three controversial books about Jesus: Barbara Thiering's Jesus the Man, A. N. Wilson's Jesus: A Life, and John Shelby Spong's Born of a Woman. While Wright agrees with those authors that the real, historical Jesus has many surprises in store for institutional Christianity, he also presents solid reasons for discounting their arguments, claiming that they "fail to reach anything like the right answer" as to who Jesus really was.

Written from the standpoint of professional biblical scholarship yet assuming no prior knowledge of the subject, Wright's Who Was Jesus? shows convincingly that much can be gained from a rigorous historical assessment of what the Gospels say about Jesus. This is a book to engage skeptics and believers alike.

©2016 eChristian (P)2016 eChristian

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Excellent scholarship and very readable

Wright has a gift for combining simplicity and profundity in his writings and this short book does not disappoint. And apart from the reader's consistent mispronunciation of one of the key scholars under review, the book is read very well.

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Great content, sometimes distracting narrator

This is a fantastic read, and NT Wright delivers all that could be expected of this book. My only complaint is that the narrator's delivery is sometimes distracting, not for the any particular reason (Wright's other audio books from British narrators are not distracting to me) but even my wife concurred that she found the narrator difficult to listen to. I still give the book a 5 star, it's well worth the read (or listen).