Scripture and the Authority of God

How to Read the Bible Today
Narrated by: James Adams
Length: 6 hrs and 37 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (155 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

In this revised and expanded edition of The Last Word, Wright, Bishop of Durham, one of the preeminent Bible scholars of our day and author of such beloved works as After You Believe and Simply Christian, gives new life to the old, tattered doctrine of the authority of Scripture, delivering a fresh, helpful, and concise statement on the current battles for the Bible; and restoring Scripture as a place to find God's voice.

Removing the baggage that the last hundred years of controversy and confusion have placed on this doctrine, he renews listeners' confidence in the Bible and explains that the Bible can still be a guide for their lives. This updated version includes two new case studies, taking a closer look at what it means to keep the Sabbath holy, and examining how Christians can defend marital monogamy in modern society.

©2011 N.T. Wright (P)2011 christianaudio.com

What listeners say about Scripture and the Authority of God

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Takes scripture very seriously

Scripture and The Authority of God is a reworking of a 2005 book, The Last Word and I think is the most accessible and best book of Wright’s that I have read.

The basic thesis of this book is that the authority of scripture is completely dependent on the authority of God. So there is no separate authority of scripture apart from God. This seems fairly uncontroversial, but it is important. The book opens with a fairly long discussion about how we currently understand scripture. This necessarily involves a discussion of the enlightenment, modernism, post-modernism and a variety of other subjects. It is not a wasted discussion and while it may be a little repetitive for people that are fairly conversent with Wright and with his line of thinking, it really cannot be skipped.

The next section is a long discussion of what it means for scripture to have authority and then how we should and should not read scripture. This center section is really the meat of the book. This is the section where I was most impressed and most convicted that the Evangelical world in general, and I in specific, do not spend enough time or effort in scripture itself. Evangelicals like to talk about scripture and we often read it, but we do not often really study and allow scripture to change us. Wright believes that while personal reading of scripture is very important, scripture needs to be the center of our corporate worship. I know my church, and many Evangelical churches, no longer have focused scripture reading. The sermons attempt to be scripture explication, but extended readings of scripture (more than 90 seconds) are just not a part of the average worship service.

The last section is entirely new to this edition of the book. Wright takes Sabbath and the idea of monogamy within marriage as models to help the reader learn how to appropriately read scripture and submit to its authority. (Longer review on my blog at bookwi.se)

22 people found this helpful

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Educational

At first I thought I wasn’t going to like it but I learned so much I ended up liking it a lot.

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disappointing

little actual information, little clearly expressed thought

I think this book has little to offer those who don't already know and agree with the author's conclusions

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Wright Writes on the Writings

AT A GLANCE:
A high (and highly qualified) look at the Testaments.

CONTENT:
The study of the Hebrew Scriptures and Christian New Testament is fraught with issues and varieties of interpretation. N.T. Wright guides us through many common mistakes in reading these texts, then analyzes different methodologies from the critical to the allegorical, and finally spends far too much time off-topic. He sketches out his own view of reading the Scriptures as a cohesive whole story, emphasizing its historical context.
There were a few confusing points that seemed more asserted than supported, such as how the Christian West is so preoccupied with the divine/human theology that they miss part of the picture; it could easily be argued that this is more of an Eastern preoccupation stemming from the first six Ecumenical Councils onwards. He also spends far too much time in digression on the Sabbath and other issues that are only briefly related to his thesis.

NARRATOR:
James Adams rose to the occasion and provided suitable narration. His intonations reflected an understanding of the source material and its technical arguments. I wouldn't hesitate to listen to more of his work if the topic was interesting.

OVERALL:
Wright's view on Scripture is as complicated and nuanced as expected. I doubt all of it will be retained by his readers, but his style and carefully-argued points make it definitely worth a go for those interested.

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God’s Word and Authority

A timely read to be sure. This should be read, reread and studied by serious and faithful Christians.

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Not a simple read, however I found it insightful

Not a simple read, however I found it insightful. It indicates it is a resource on how to read the bible. I'm not sure I can say that is what I gained from it.

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A wonderful point made well

Here NT wright makes a wonderful case for a more thoughtful and effective way of reading the scriptures, and thereby hearing the voice of God spoken authoritatively to his people.

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Good book that is above me to follow

NT Wright and I are on different brain waves, his way above mine. The last specific studies at the end of the book are good.

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Well done

Excellent, scholarly work. NT Wright is, as always, thoughtful in his handling of the topic at hand.

1 person found this helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars

Good book, good reading, metallic sounding.

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

There is a metallic sound throughout the reading.

What did you like best about this story?

The book itself. N.T. Wright.

Which scene was your favorite?

I enjoyed the whole book.