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Publisher's Summary

For centuries, the story of Adam and Eve has resonated richly through the corridors of art, literature, and theology. But for most moderns, taking it at face value is incongruous. And even for many thinking Christians today who want to take seriously the authority of Scripture, insisting on a "literal" understanding of Genesis 2-3 looks painfully like a "tear here" strip between faith and science.

How can Christians of good faith move forward? Who were the historical Adam and Eve? What if we've been reading Genesis - and its claims regarding material origins - wrong? In what cultural context was this couple, this garden, this tree, this serpent portrayed?

Following his groundbreaking Lost World of Genesis One, John Walton explores the ancient Near Eastern context of Genesis 2-3, creating space for a faithful reading of Scripture along with full engagement with science for a new way forward in the human origins debate. As a bonus, an illuminating excursus by N. T. Wright places Adam in the implied narrative of Paul's theology.

The Lost World of Adam and Eve is a must-listen book for anyone seeking to understand this foundational text historically, and theologically, and wondering how to view it alongside contemporary understandings of human origins.

©2015 John H. Walton (P)2018 Tantor

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Exceptional look into Genesis

Years ago I read The Science of God by Gerald Schroeder. It took a scientific approach to looking at Genesis. This book is to Religion what that book is to Science. It flips the tables and views Science through the lense of Genesis.

His thorough knowledge of Hebrew and the ancient texts allow John Walton to clear up the misconceptions of a contradictory relationship between Genesis and science. It's an amazing book I highly recommend to those struggling to square these two views.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Brave New World

I don't know if I agree with all the proposals of this book, but it is a great starting place for a new interpretation of the Genesis account. It's basis is not grounded in church history, but what the original author intended for the original hearers. This book will definitely get you thinking.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Not For Me

Let me preface this review by saying that I have not listened to this author's original work, "The Lost World of Genesis One". Having said that, let me say that I did recently listen to the EXCELLENT Great Courses lecture series titled "The Book of Genesis" by Gary Rendsburg, and so when I got this book, "The Lost World of Adam and Eve", I was expecting an amazing literary analysis of Genesis Chapters 2 & 3. That is the primary reason I got this audio book.

Now, perhaps my expectations were too high, I don't know, but I was extremely disappointed by this book. Perhaps I was expecting too much? Instead of a literary exposition of Genesis 2 & 3, I found myself listening to a pseudo-science philosophical interpretation of the Author attempting to merge modern science with the Genesis account, which is incompatible!! The irony here is that the Author admits that you cannot expect Genesis to concur with modern science, and yet he still tries to explain how Adam & Eve may not have been the first humans (an attempt to merge the Genesis text with modern science). Genesis 3:20 clearly states: "Adam named his wife Eve, because she would become the mother of all the living." Genesis clearly teaches that Adam & Eve were the first AND ONLY humans, any idea to the contrary is a deviation from Genesis' original author's intended meaning.

It is clear that the ancient Hebrews borrowed ideas from other civilizations living at the time when Genesis was written, and that the book of Genesis was tailored to their monotheistic beliefs. The idea that the ancient Hebrews alluded to evolution in their writings is a joke! Specifically, the idea that the use of the term "the Adam" (translated: the man) in Genesis refers to a "class" of humans, or a "species" of humans, and that the text allows for other species of hominids to have lived alongside Adam & Eve is a travesty of the ancient Hebrew text. Not only was this book disappointing for me, but as others have noted, the narrator was monotone and uninteresting. I regret spending money on this title.

If you are looking for an excellent exposition of the ancient Hebrew text found in the book of Genesis, do yourself a favor and just get Gary Rendsburg's "The Book of Genesis" by The Great Courses. If you are looking for an accurate, in-depth analysis of the Hebrew text concerning the Adam & Eve story, look elsewhere. All you will find here is wordplay as the author tries to force the Genesis account to work with modern science, and in my opinion, he fails at it.

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Excitingly Informative

Many interesting points. Good explanation. Narrator sometimes a bit monotone. Otherwise, good read and worth repeating.