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Publisher's Summary

Leading apologetics writer with a proven track record tackles the most difficult Old Testament passages and topics, helping listeners to reconcile the God of righteousness with the God of love.

©2011 Paul Copan (P)2016 Baker Publishing Group

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • BruceB
  • Hillsboro, OR
  • 10-07-17

Well-rounded, thorough, and not bulletproof

As much as this audiobook presented material that was often presented in a dry, systematic manner, the narrator and the material hit the mark of completing a sweeping response to all the complaints about the morality of God, His people, and the Law of Moses based on events and teachings in the Old Testament. I was impressed that, as different topics and questions were addressed, I might think of a question or issue with the logic or information presented, and then, before the discussion of the topic was complete, those questions and issues were often addressed! :) I say that Mr. Copan's material isn't bulletproof as an apologetic because folks' perspectives on these topics and questions may not be satisfied with answers like 'the situation was a significant moral upgrade of existing social values' or things like that. For people who see themselves as having a superior intellect and moral foundation to which God must answer, some of Dr. Copan's arguments and conclusions will come short. But within faith in the risen Lord Jesus Christ and Him being the fulfillment of the Law and the revelation of God's character in light of that Law, it is a very powerful and condensed refutation of neo-atheist criticisms.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Alot to think about.

This book refutes attempted secular moral arguments against the God of the Bible. It also discusses the use of hyperbole in the Old Testament.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

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Answering the hard questions of the Old Testament!

Please read this book! It is very long but it's worth it. If you have ever struggled with the Old Testament before this book will answer your questions. Single-handedly this book refutes any Old Testament disputes of what really happened in ancient Israel.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

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not bad

I thought it was informative. the author seemed to hold a mainline theological position. Give it a listen.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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A well-presented theological response

Far too little attention is given in the popular media today to those who have well-reasoned biblical responses to the claims of Neo atheists that have gone viral and have caused many to embrace poorly examined unsubstantiated claims under the banner of modern reason. This book is a worthy response, based in sound theological argumentation, drawn not only from scripture but also from history and even the positions of moderate atheist who view many popularized neo-atheistic claims as extreme, poorly argued and embarrassing.

Passages of scripture that are often difficult to interpret and used as targets by radical popular atheists are explained within their context and appropriately applied. The erroneous claims of atheist are addressed in a compassionate, but pointed and well researched fashion. This book is informative, enjoyable, and a wonderful contribution to biblical apologetics.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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a different point of view.

it is interesting to realize what GOD'S plan for the nation of Israel really was, not exactly what we think GOD planned

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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In your face Dawkins!

This is a refreshing book that lets the Christian reader know that he doesn't have to apologize for the God of the Old Testament. A great explanation of why calling God a moral monster is more to stir a emotional response rather than any in depth look at the subject matter.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Is God a moral monster?

As a 45 year student of the Bible and apologetics, I greatly enjoy and profited from this work.

8 of 13 people found this review helpful

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Hard Sayings, Hard Listen

What made the experience of listening to Is God a Moral Monster? the most enjoyable?

The content, while oftentimes surface-level from an exegetical standpoint, was thoughtful and on-the-nose without getting too provocative.

What other book might you compare Is God a Moral Monster? to and why?

It's somewhat polemical like its rivals The God Delusion, The End of Faith, etc.

What aspect of Claton Butcher’s performance would you have changed?

I never quite got used to the narration. While it often fit the subject matter, it was sneery and over-enunciated. At certain points I felt like the narrator's tone was more condescending than the author intended. It was passable and carried the book without becoming boring, but I would recommend reading it in print instead.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The extended context given to the Binding of Isaac was quite informative for a popular work on the topic.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Boring

This book just seems to be a bunch of excuses, not explanations, for the difficult passages in the Old Testament. In one of the last chapters of the book, he even states that the church is the true Israel. That's when I stopped listening.

1 of 4 people found this review helpful