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Publisher's Summary

For Fareed Zakaria, the great story of our times is not the decline of America but rather the rise of everyone else - the growth of countries such as China, India, Brazil, Russia, South Africa, Kenya, and many, many more.

This economic growth is generating a new global landscape where power is shifting and wealth and innovation are bubbling up in unexpected places. It's also producing political confidence and national pride. As these trends continue, the push of globalization will increasingly be joined by the pull of nationalism - a tension that is likely to define the next decades.

With his customary lucidity, insight, and imagination, Zakaria draws on lessons from the two great power shifts of the past 500 years - the rise of the Western world and the rise of the United States - to tell us what we can expect from the third shift, the "rise of the rest".

Washington must begin a serious transformation of global strategy and seek to share power, create coalitions, build legitimacy, and define the global agenda. None of this will be easy for the greatest power the world has ever known - the only power that for so long has really mattered. But all that is changing now. The future we face is the post-American world.

©2008 Fareed Zakaria; (P)2008 Simon and Schuster, Inc.

Critic Reviews

"A definitive handbook for political and business leaders who want to succeed in a global era." (Walter Isaacson, author of Einstein: His Life and Universe)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
  • Pat
  • Thousand Oaks, CA, USA
  • 01-24-10

Getting to Hear Fareed

Marvelous "story" ... better than anything one could make up. Just how it is in the world, just how everyone strives.

I learned a great deal and got to hear Fareed at the same time! THANKS for the book and the communication.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Impressive

Fareed brings us a well researched and reasoned view into the future.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • fred
  • greensboro nc
  • 06-29-09

Interesting perspective but a little dated

Fans of Thomas Friedman will recognize many concepts. The author pulls in new ideas. Based on recent political and financial upheavals the book is a little dated but worth a listen.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Brad
  • Los Altos Hills, CA, USA
  • 02-13-09

Good background on USA's future

I liked the stage-setting that this book offered for the world ahead of us Americans. It was great to read/listen to this book, then read "Crash Proof" and "The Little Book ..." (both by Peter Schiff). Scary stuff for future generations, including my retirement years!

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Kevin
  • Big Sandy, TN, USA
  • 07-29-08

Excellent Book!

This is an EXCELLENT book and sure hits the point! Well done, Fareed!

1 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Fareed at his best

Fareed at his best

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Lawrence
  • Ellicott City, MD, United States
  • 05-30-08

A great country

when a Newsweek reporter can write a book to influence the critical dialogue of a nation that doesn't have critical dialogue as a nation and the folks who hold power probably aren't listening to books like this. So get out and vote?! Or not? Very easy to weave a narrative in and out of a topic this broad. Ultimately is there a need for this discussion? Yes. Does the author address the most critical issues? Not so sure there. We have just come from a very unpopular president who threw historical context to the wind and are about to elect another character who promises to do the same. Yet the pros and cons of rule by an educated elite (China) versus an elected elite (US, India) is touched upon but not in a more in depth fashion as I would have hoped. This lack of depth is made more appalling by the authors exploration of the US's educational system failing very poorly a significant percentage of the population. But no need to link these issues? He also seems to think we live in a world where muslim, jew, and immoral westerner can live side by side in brotherly harmony. Despite high oil prices... despite China's ability to do side deals with corrupt dictators who rely upon suppression. The price to acquire weapons of mass destruction are falling by the day at the same time the ability to finance these weapons is rising. Not that the absolute difficulty for Al Queda to acquire a bomb hasn't risen. Not that the disaffected aren't shrinking as a class (excepting the mostly muslim societies ruled by dictatorship). But the probability of the disaffected acquiring a weapon of mass destruction appears to be rising. The author appears to be quite cavalier about the challenges of our time. Western style individual liberties will almost certainly end up curtailed. Where is that discussion? Is Bush wrong to bring liberty to Arab dictatorships? Is the nation state relevant? For how long?

1 of 6 people found this review helpful