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The Great Ideas of Philosophy, 2nd Edition Lecture

The Great Ideas of Philosophy, 2nd Edition

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Publisher's Summary

Grasp the important ideas that have served as the backbone of philosophy across the ages with this extraordinary 60-lecture series. This is your opportunity to explore the enormous range of philosophical perspectives and ponder the most important and enduring of human questions - without spending your life poring over dense philosophical texts.

Professor Robinson guides you through more than 2,000 years of philosophical thinking and gives you a coherent, comprehensive, and beautifully articulated introduction to the great conversation of philosophy. Every lecture contains substance that can change your view of the world and its history.

You'll journey from the early philosophical ideas of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle; chart the origins of Christian philosophy and investigate the Islamic scholars who preserved and extended Greek thought during the Middle Ages; and venture through Enlightenment contributions to philosophy, from Francis Bacon to Locke, Hume, Kant, Mill, and Adam Smith.

Then shift your attention to the modern era, where you see groundbreaking ideas like psychoanalysis, pragmatism, and nihilism, as well as the collision between the inherently social understanding of meaning created by Wittgenstein, the vastly different estimation of human thought developed by the code-breaking genius Alan Turing, and the subtle response to him made by the American philosopher John Searle.

While the lectures cover an enormous range of key thinkers and ideas, they always focus on the most important ideas. The result is a course that gives you everything you need to finally grasp humanity's exciting philosophical history - without years of intense academic study and piles of dense reading.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2004 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2004 The Great Courses

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.4 (890 )
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Performance
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  •  
    Brian Eberman 03-07-16 Member Since 2015
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Wordy and fairly content less."

    This Is a survey of thought from Homer to recent 20th century thought. Each lecture the presentation uses 10 words when 2 will do. it becomes quite tedious to listen to and the amount of information is small for such a large presentation.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ryan 02-20-16
    Ryan 02-20-16 Member Since 2016
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    "Succinct"

    The speaker touches on most of the greatest thoughts in human history in a historical orientation. All individuals should experience a lecture on philosophy like this, if not this one.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Gaggleframpf 12-21-15 Member Since 2016
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Not much integration"

    I bought this course as an introduction to philosophy in general, and that is what I'm basing my review on.

    The professor doesn't try very hard to integrate the thoughts of each lecture into a bigger conceptual scheme. I felt very isolated from one lecture to the next. The lectures are good enough in content, and would be great if you just wanted to turn on a lecture here or there to hear some random topic in philosophy talked about by an educated person. But as an intro to philosophy it falls short.

    If you're looking for a conceptual scheme dealing with the progression of philosophy and giving a more comprehensive intro, I highly recommend the "Great Minds in the Western Intellectual Tradition" from the Great Courses.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Hendrick Mcdonald 09-09-15 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Less Would Be More Here"

    These lectures go from philosopher to philosopher, which is fine, but the purpose of each lecture I felt was lost in the details. Each philosopher has something to add, but I tended to get lost in the fog of considerations, thought experiments, and refutation.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Majed Ahmad 08-17-15
    Majed Ahmad 08-17-15 Member Since 2015
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    "Disorganized and unstructured"

    This is a long and interesting course, but has many shortcomings. Here are my thoughts on this course:
    1- This is not a traditional course. It is not organized or structured like other Great Courses. I found that many lectures introduced ideas that have nothing to do with the lecture's theme. Also, I struggled to find a theme at all for many of the lectures. This is a discussion, not a course.
    2- Despite the above, I found the discussion to be interesting. It was engaging and thought provoking, but to me It just wasn't a good way to learn about the great ideas of philosophy. The ideas were too unstructured and random for me to capture and learn coherently.
    3- The professor is eloquent and knowledgeable,but has a tendency to complicate ideas by using unclear language. At times, I felt the ideas to be very simple but the language used to explain them is twisted and exaggerated.
    4- The professor, being a Christian, emphasized Christian philosophy. I was hoping for a fair or equal review of all religion philosophies, and those philosophical views that might question religions.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    A Customer 03-26-15
    A Customer 03-26-15
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    "Best course ever!"

    Best course ever! 30 hours of nonstop brilliance. I only wish I'd been able to attend these lectures in person.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    A. M. 03-26-15
    A. M. 03-26-15

    Geopolitics, history, and philosophy junkie. I love smoothly flowing prose that moves me effortlessly from one idea to the next.

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    "Professor Daniel N. Robinson is brilliant!"
    Any additional comments?

    60 Lectures: not all equal in substance but certainly equal in quality. Prof. Robinson is subperb at the art of lecture. The material wasn't always great. The depth of the subject matter was lacking in some situations. I would recommend listening to this after fully investigating your subjects first. This will help remind you and round things out.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ian 06-03-14
    Ian 06-03-14 Member Since 2012
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    "The great ideas of philosophy: Christian edition."
    Would you try another book from The Great Courses and/or Professor Daniel N. Robinson?

    Absolutely not. It started out in Greece and Rome not bad... but then Christianity came along and it became extremely biased and devoted to promoting the author's faith and its supposed genius.


    What three words best describe Professor Daniel N. Robinson’s performance?

    Passionate. Biased. Christian.


    What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

    I was very disappointed. He's intelligent and he has promise, but he sees the world through a "Christianity is perfect" lens which just does not make sense for a supposed critical-thinking piece of work.


    Any additional comments?

    Don't bother unless you're already very devoted to being Christian.

    46 of 74 people found this review helpful
  •  
    J. Bryan New York, New York United States 05-21-14
    J. Bryan New York, New York United States 05-21-14 Member Since 2012

    liking the sound

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    "Interesting material. Out of touch professor"
    What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

    I am fascinated by philosophy and it's history, but this treatment of it was an incredible waist of time. You hear very little interesting substance of philosophy. Also, let it be noted this is all Western Philosophy, which is fine, but philosophically speaking India and China were centuries ahead of the west for most of human history and that's where a lot of the good stuff is. There was also a Christian bent to the lecture which was distracting. It was weird to hear someone teach philosophy, while maintaining a religious circular logic. In fact in his grand conclusion for how to live the best life (as if there is one answer for everyone) he claims that happiness would be to live the life of Mother Teresa. This is a perfect example with the problem with Daniel Robinson. Mother Teresa struggled with horrible lifelong depression and misery (read her letters if you don't believe me.) I'm not sure if Robinson is unaware of this, if he thinks happiness is irrelevant to a good life, or if he simply thinks his listeners aren't aware. Either way, his conclusions are strange and he seems to try to wrap philosophy into a justification for Christianity. I'm not trying to knock his beliefs, but if I had to listen to class on philosophy as a way of justifying Islam or zoroastrianism I would find it pretty useless too. I don't know how this guy got to teach a class in anything.


    Would you ever listen to anything by The Great Courses again?

    Generally I love the great courses and look forward to the next one I listen to.


    How could the performance have been better?

    If the professor had stuck with philosophy and kept the theology to himself.


    What character would you cut from The Great Ideas of Philosophy, 2nd Edition?

    Democritus, Hume


    Any additional comments?

    Instead try "Philosophy of Mind: Brains, Consciousness, and Thinking Machines" or just do Will Durant

    28 of 46 people found this review helpful
  •  
    leah 05-04-14
    leah 05-04-14
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "It's okay"
    Would you try another book from The Great Courses and/or Professor Daniel N. Robinson?

    Great courses: yes. I'll avoid dr Robinson, however. He was difficult to listen to.


    How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

    The title is misleading. It should be something like: Western European thought leaders.


    What do you think the narrator could have done better?

    He was slow and did not hold my attention.


    Any additional comments?

    I'm not saying it was awful, it was just not for me. According to this course no one out side of westerns had any thoughts on life worth covering. The 5 min devoted to the Middle East was to say that they were nothing more than stewards of the great ideas of Western Europe during the Middle Ages. Other than that: no contributions. <br/><br/>The lack of attention to other cultures is at least one sided, but could be addressed in a better title. the way the Middle East was covered, however just seemed inappropriate, and insulting.

    5 of 9 people found this review helpful

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