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Publisher's Summary

A powerful defense of intellectual freedom told through the ordeals of contemporary scientists attacked for exploring controversial ideas, by a noted science historian and medical activist.

An investigation of some of the most contentious debates of our time, Galileo's Middle Finger describes Alice Dreger's experiences on the front lines of scientific controversy, where for two decades she has worked as an advocate for victims of unethical research while also defending the right of scientists to pursue challenging research into human identities. Dreger's own attempts to reconcile academic freedom with the pursuit of justice grew out of her research into the treatment of people born intersex (formerly called hermaphrodites). The shocking history of surgical mutilation and ethical abuses conducted in the name of "normalizing" intersex children moved her to become a patient rights' activist. By bringing evidence to physicians and the public, she helped change the medical system.

©2015 Alice Dreger (P)2015 Gildan Media LLC

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  • Wayne
  • Matthews, NC
  • 01-01-16

Clarion call for separating science and ideology

First, the title refers to the fact that Galileo's mummified middle finger is in an Italian museum.

The author, a science historian, demonstrates with case after case that failure to separate the scientific investigation from personal/group religious, social, and political ideology leads to bad science. Her examples are all from the political left, where she resides and is comfortable. Many of the political and social beliefs of leftist social justice warriors are so strong that to investigate them scientifically is treated as heresy.

One in 2000 births results in a child of uncertain gender assignment, a condition now called "intersex" but formally called "hermaphroditism". Most of the book is about gender assignment issues either intersex or through preference after childhood.

Even for those who have not faced intersex issues this non-fiction book is worthwhile as a study of how ideology and government money perverts honest scientific investigation.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

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Couldn't stop listening to this book

I wanted to read this book at my sister's insistance, because I love reading stories of this type as a scientist myself. But I didn't have time to read anything, so I downloaded the audio version instead. I finished it that same day, I couldn't stand to put it on pause. I listened all through work and on my comute to and fro, and loved it.

This book is so interesting, thoughtful, and so meticulously researched. I very much enjoyed it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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massively inconsistent

The main point of this book is incredibly important. Real science is often attacked by the identity groups it's evidence contradicts. Great stuff on this. But a huge part of the book, perhaps 1/2 - 2/3, is a he said she said blow by blow rundown of the minutia of several of these conflicts. It felt like a sewing circle talking about that wayward girl and every abundant way she brought shame to her mother. I don't like gossip. I like evidence. for a book that says it prizes evidence as much as I do, much of it felt an awful lot like gossip. I compromised on 4 stars, because the core message was really that important.


The narration added to the feeling that I was listening to gossip. Breathy and self important. I assume the narrator was reflecting the wishes of the author, and if that was the case, she nailed it, and really deserves 5 stars. However, if that was not the intention of the author, this greatly detracted from the book. I compromised on 4 stars here as well


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Thoughtful: science, social justice, democracy

Any additional comments?

Dreger and I were in the same graduate program 20 years ago. It was clear then that she was an outstanding scholar an exceptional human being. After one of her talks as a grad student, I heard Cognitive Science prof. Douglas Hofstadter lean over to a colleague and say "she's good". Once again, it shows.<br/><br/>Galileo's Middle Finger documents, in a meticulous evidence-based way, Dreger's journey from her Ph.D. work on intersex into activism as she realized that 19th-century prejudices were still standard medical practice, and beyond as she is swept into an unfamiliar world where identity trumps evidence, in a direction she is not expecting. When Dreger brings her same thorough methods of investigation into the controversy surrounding Michael Bailey's popular-press book on transgender women, she is surprised to find Bailey the victim of a smear campaign. <br/><br/>Dreger documents the Bailey case thoroughly and clearly. Regardless whether Bailey's theory is correct, it is clear that he was an unjust target of dishonest tactics. Documenting this brought Dreger herself in the line of fire. Her book details how that played out, and then also discusses several other controversies in depth, including: Napoleon Chagnon, Margaret Mead, and EO Wilson. <br/><br/>(Before continuing, let me say that Gilbert's narration is exceptional. The clarity and inflection made it easy to imagine that it was the author's own voice speaking directly to the reader.)<br/><br/>There is so much detail and feeling about any of these particular cases, that it is easy to get lost in one particular controversy and miss the bigger picture. The book is not about Galileo. Rather, because Galileo's story is well known, Dreger uses him as an exemplar of what she sees in common in all of her stories: namely the struggle between evidence and orthodoxy, or if you prefer, between evidence and political correctness. The story is particularly acute when the messengers are brash and iconoclastic, which is to say not very politically correct -- whether by politically correct you mean adhering to societal norms, or being socially sensitive.<br/><br/>Dreger makes a passionate and well supported plea for always putting the evidence first, and argues that this is necessary for both justice and democracy, and that we keep forgetting two important truths: 1. our adversaries are usually not evil, and 2. our good intentions will not keep us from doing harm, even if we are on the "right" side. <br/><br/>The book was written before the most recent US election, but emerges at a time when evidence and truth have taken an even more central role in public discussion then they have in a long time. Both sides of the political divide take it his self evident that they have truth and evidence on their side, so much so that apparent evidence to the contrary is taken as a threat to identity and authority, and there is a strong temptation to discredit -- or slander -- the source. <br/><br/>I can easily see those on the other side doing this. To her credit, Dreger faces the situation when her own social and political allies become similarly evidence blind, and not only lets herself be persuaded by the evidence, but doggedly pursues it even when the outcome does not match her presuppositions or preferences. <br/><br/>The question is whether the rest of us can do the same.

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The virtues and follies of social justice.

"You cannot hand justice without truth" sums the book up pretty nicely. In the politically correct age, the author lays down the dangers of social justice without science in the sciences.

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  • K. Roth
  • Pacific Northwest
  • 02-18-16

excellent book on studies of sex ambiguities in babies and why the sex choice should not be the doctors choice!

Excellent book on the sex ambiguities of babies and the social and personal implications as to why the sex choice should not be the doctors decision, but the individual.
Great points were made in her research on conjoined twins and how most felt broken and torn when surgically separated.
Many times the decision made by others has caused severe implications and even suicide to the individual.
This is a book for all to read and will bring light on a subject many fear to talk about!

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Science corrupted by perverse morality.

Great insight into the state of science. Changed my understanding of biological xx and xy as it relates to the spectrum of sexual manifestation.

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Media file wont play on my desired device.

Would you try another book from Alice Dreger and/or Tavia Gilbert?

Not without free use on my media device of choice.

What was most disappointing about Alice Dreger’s story?

N/A

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Tavia Gilbert?

N/A

What character would you cut from Galileo's Middle Finger?

N/A

Any additional comments?

I have a media device I use regularly that I wanted to listen to books on but with current DRM it is not possible. Computer phone or new device will not do and are not desired.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Annoying performance

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

Start over with another reader

Has Galileo's Middle Finger turned you off from other books in this genre?

No.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

Performance would be more appropriate for a work of fiction--too emotive for nonfiction.

Any additional comments?

I may have to buy the book to get through it

0 of 3 people found this review helpful