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Publisher's Summary

Victoria Thompson is the Edgar Award-nominated author of the Gaslight Mysteries and numerous historical romance novels. Set in 19th-century New York, Murder on Fifth Avenue follows midwife Sarah Brandt and Detective Sergeant Frank Malloy as they investigate the murder of a Knickerbocker club member.

©2012 Victoria Thompson (P)2012 Recorded Books, LLC

Critic Reviews

“Thompson vividly recreates the gaslit world of old New York.” ( Publishers Weekly)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Good story, but narration grates

This is one of the best stories in the series about midwife Sarah Brandt and her friend Detective Sgt Frank Malloy. For a while it seemed as though the series had been in a slump, and all the stories and narrations were under par. But lately, I think the plots are getting very interesting again, though I fear I can't say the same for the narration.

In this book, Frank Malloy has been called in to investigate a murder at the prestigious Knickerbocker Club--a friend of Sarah Brandt's father has been murdered, and he wants Frank, personally, to look into it. This book has Sarah's parents much more involved than previously, and I think that's partly what makes this better. Her mother even helps with the investigation.But the story itself is good as well. Lots of people who have ample motive to kill the victim, and it kept me guessing all along about who could have done it.

One thing I really like about Victoria Thompson is that she weaves bits of turn of the 20th century history into her stories and I always like that. Attitudes about things alter over time, and this story turns on societal ideas, the restrictions of women, and even early ideas about policing. About the narration--Suzanne Toren reads the descriptive parts very nicely, and does some voices quite well. Yet, there are several voices that leave me feeling like fingernails on a chalkboard. She doesn't do male voices at all well. So it is sort of uneven. I like the series well enough to listen anyway.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Great instalment

Loved it! A terrific chapter in the adventures of Sarah Brandt.

As always, I looked forward to more developments between her and Frank with each book, and again I was disappointed that this episode didn’t move their romantic relationship along a little more, but I do like the direction her parents are going in.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • MJ
  • MN
  • 02-27-17

New York at the Turn of the Century

Very entertaining mystery depicting life in New York among the rich and famous. The mystery of the "killer" did not reveal itself too early to keep the book entertaining until the end.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Carole T.
  • Shepherdstown, WV, United States
  • 06-10-12

A Little Spice, Please!

Sweetness is nice, but it needs a bit of tartness to be really tasty. Victoria Thompson, in her Gaslight Series, has always offered the mildest of cozy experiences. I have enjoyed the concept of her independent heroine with a social conscience. In later entries, however, I find myself longing for Sarah Brandt's perfect little daughter to have a temper tantrum, or for Sarah and her policeman Malloy to share a feisty argument or a steamy kiss - some evidence of sexual tension! Sarah has become coy, and the innocence of the series has become a cloying sweetness.
In this, the narrator shares responsibility. Her voices are varied, but overly syrupy. If the author and narrator continue to offer no touch of spice, I'm giving up on this series.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful