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Publisher's Summary

The year is 878, and the Saxons of Wessex, under King Alfred, have defeated the Danes to keep their kingdom free. Uhtred, the dispossessed son of a Northumbrian lord, helped Alfred win that victory, but now he is disgusted by Alfred's lack of generosity. Uhtred flees Wessex, going north to search for his stepsister in the formidable stronghold of Dunholm.

Uhtred arrives in the north to discover rebellion, chaos, and fear. His only ally is Hild, a West Saxon nun fleeing her calling, and his best hope is his sword. Needing other allies, he chooses Guthred, a seemingly deluded slave who believes he is a king. Together they cross the Pennines to where a desperate alliance of fanatical Christians and beleaguered Danes form a new army to confront the terrible Viking lords who rule Northumbria. Instead of victory, Uhtred finds betrayal. But he also discovers love and redemption as he is forced to turn once again to his reluctant ally, Alfred the Great.

A breathtaking adventure, Lords of the North is also the story of the creation of modern England, as the English and Danes gradually become one people, adopting each other's languages and fighting side by side.

Ready for battle? Download the other titles in Bernard Cornwell's Alfred the Great series: The Last Kingdom and The Pale Horseman.
©2007 by Bernard Cornwell (P)2007 HarperCollins Publishers

Critic Reviews

"Cornwell...breathes life into ancient history with disarming ease, peppering it with humor and even innocence." (Publishers Weekly)

What members say

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Chip
  • Miami Shores, FL, United States
  • 02-10-07

Cornwall at his best

Like the Lord of the Rings Trilogy, the Saxon Chronicles take a while to catch on. The first book was engaging but not gripping. The second was better and this thiird one, "Lords of the North" was just Superb. Uhtred is the essence of untamed masculine ethos and the reader grows to love him more and more with the passing of time. Like most of Cornwall's novels, female/male relationships tend to be rather superficial, and repeating romances starts to get old after a while. However, the action is fast paced, the battles are brutal and the plot is pure Cornwallian Fascination.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

ARSEling not EARsling...also too short

I loved the story. however it had horrible narration. Did Mr. Glover listen to Keeble's recordings? he uses completely different pronunciation for people, place names and insults. it was difficult trying to figure out where and who he was talking about at times. to this point Uhtred has been a gruff voiced pagan, this narrator makes him sound like a mewling priest. also this audio book is half as long as the previous book but costs the same?

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

What a great story

Being a descendant of a few Great Vikings, I really enjoyed this book. The story was very believable and I really belt bad for the main character when he was sold into slavery.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Brad
  • Walland, TN, USA
  • 05-04-08

Stronger Language

Cornwell continues the saga of Utred's captivity and forced slavery. The writing is lively, never dull, and characterized by several climatic man-to-man challenges on his quest to regain prominence lost. Readers should be warned, however, that some of the verbal sparing breaks into rather vicious and sexually-charged insults cast against the enemy. The nature of these insults are extremely graphic and pity the listener who has this playing audibly in a carload full of kids. Descriptions of violent sword play highlight the work as well.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful