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Publisher's Summary

Following the phenomenal success of Necronomicon, its companion volume brings together Lovecraft's remaining major stories plus his weird poetry, a number of obscure revisions, and some notable nonfiction, including the seminal critical essay "Supernatural Horror in Literature."

Gathering together in chronological order the rest of Lovecraft's rarely seen but extraordinary short fiction, this collection includes the entirety of the long-out-of-print collection of thirty-six sonnets "Fungi from Yuggoth."

Lovecraft died at the age of forty-seven, but in his short life he turned out dozens of stories that changed the face of horror. His extraordinary imagination spawned both the Elder God Cthulhu and his eldritch cohorts, as well as the strangely compelling town of Innsmouth, all of which feature here.

©2014 H.P. Lovecraft (P)2014 Blackstone Audiobooks

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Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
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Performance

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Story

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Audiobook Contents

History of the Necronomicon
The Alchemist
A Reminiscence of Dr. Samuel Johnson
The Beast in the Cave
The Poe-et's Nightmare
Memory
Despair
The Picture in the House
Beyond the Wall of Sleep
Psychopompos; A Tale in Rhyme
The White Ship
The House
The Nightmare Lake
Poetry and the Gods
Nyarlathotep
Polaris
The Street
Ex Oblivione
Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family
The Crawling Chaos
The Terrible Old Man
The Tree
The Tomb
Celephais
Hypnos
What the Moon Brings
The Horror at Martin's Beach
The Festival
The Temple
Hallowe'en in a Suburb
The Moon-Bog
He
Festival
The Green Meadow
Nathicana
Two Black Bottles
The Last Test
The Wood
The Ancient Track
The Electric Executioner
Fungi from Yuggoth
The Trap
The Other Gods
The Quest of Iranon
The Challenge From Beyond
In a Sequester'd Providence Churchyard Where Once Poe Walk'd
Ibid
Azathoth
The Descendant
The Book
The Messenger
The Evil Clergyman
The Very Old Folk
The Thing in the Moonlight
The Transition of Juan Romero
Supernatural Horror in Literature

99 of 100 people found this review helpful

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An Excellent, If Repeated, Performance

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I would recommend this audiobook to a friend because of the great stories that are told within. Lovecraft can be a bit hard to get into, but if you like horror then this collection has something for everyone. Stories about monsters, dreams, quests and all manner of the macabre never make it a dull.

What did you like best about this story?

Given that this is a collection, it is hard to nail down exactly what the best thing about the volume is. Since I am a fan of Lovecraft, just hearing more of his work after consuming the Dreamcycle is a great privilege.

Have you listened to any of various narrators’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I have listened to most of the narrators from the previous Lovecraft volume called Dreams of Terror and Death. I particularly enjoyed the performances of Stephan Rudnicki and Simon Vance. They've just got that voice that conveys terror so well. Armando Duran, a newcomer in this volume, adds an interesting flair to the stories set in the western parts of the United States.

Who was the most memorable character of Eldritch Tales and why?

There are simply too many to count, but Joe Slatter from Beyond the Wall of Sleep always stands out to be as a tragic figure due to the mental strain he undergoes while lacking the sophistication to relay how he feels.

Any additional comments?

I have to say that I am disappointed in the inclusion of stories from Dreams of Terror and Death. I was hoping for the inclusion of works such as The Call of Cthulhu or The Dunwich Horror and hearing quite a lot of the previous volumes content was a let down. However, the inclusion of the history of the horror fiction genre towards the end was a surprisingly interesting addition, though it is ironic Lovecraft wasn't mentioned in it.

12 of 13 people found this review helpful

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The Rest of Lovecraft

More accurately, a miscellany of Lovecraft. Blackstone Audio had already put together two almost definitive multi-voiced collections of the master: “Necronomicon” covering his great horror tales, and “Dreams of Terror and Death” covering his dark fantasy tales. This collection is full of the stuff that most “Best of Lovecraft” anthologies leave out. Included here are the master’s less regarded horror stories, stories already performed in “Dreams” and regurgitated here for filler, his poetry, his collaborations with other authors, and his essay on the history of horror stories, “Supernatural Horror in Literature.”

I feel that the lesser regarded stories are usually lesser regarded for a reason, but I did enjoy listening to them being performed. (Favorite example: the solemn Stefan Rudnicki reading “The Temple” with a slight German accent.) I was didn’t dislike the poetry, but I wonder if that is because it was good or that I can’t tell poetry from doggerel. I enjoyed one collaboration, “The Crawling Chaos,” a superb apocalyptic vision. I hated the others. I would recommend them for the library at Guantanamo. I wouldn’t listen to them again unless a track of Mike, John, and Kevin was added. As for “Supernatural Horror in Literature,” well, look at my latest acquisitions on Library Thing. Thank you, Mr. Lovecraft, I’m sure I will enjoy them.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Great collection of odd tales

The readers voices and tones fit the tales perfectly, and really add to the atmosphere of the story. This is a great collection for anyone looking to read/listen to stories of oddities and horror.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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I feel a bit shortchanged

It's all fine and good, but some of the recordings do appear in another audio book by the same publisher. With the change of main theme, I didn't think this would happen.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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2nd Best Anthology

I enjoyed this collection of Lovecraft stories. This and the Necronomicon together comprise a large percentage of well known Lovecraft writings, although this is still missing the Mountains of Madness and Shadow Over Innsmouth. I preferred the Necronomicon to this collection but did enjoy this one quite a bit. Recommended if you, like me, are looking for the highlights of Lovecraft.

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Good for the first 80%

The book was great until the last three hours that are just a history of horror stories and famous authors, wasn't that interested in that part.

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Worthwhile for Lovecraft fans

What did you love best about Eldritch Tales?

Some of the stories were amazing, and the essay on weird tales at the end was very informative.

What did you like best about this story?

The variety of stories, and unimaginable concepts Lovecraft creates.

What three words best describe various narrators’s voice?

Some were horrible.<br/>Elijah Alexander was absolutely tedious...it is painful to listen to him. It is as if he does not understand what he is reading, or did no rehearsals. His tones and meter make no sense, and make the story completely lost. When I hear his name, I want to skip that story.

Any additional comments?

Overall it is good for Lovecraft fans

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well done

I love h.p Lovecraft's tales and the performance of the narrators is well done. chapter nine is one of my favorites in this audio book.

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Awful, awful narration

Would you try another book from H. P. Lovecraft and/or various narrators?

Yes, if it actually had good narrators. Some of the narrators are fine in this but some are just unforgivable.

Who was your favorite character and why?

N/a

Would you be willing to try another one of various narrators’s performances?

n/a

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Eldritch Tales?

I don't have any problem with the writing, just with the narration. Necronomicon had a few lackluster narrators, but in particular in this book, some were just awful. I literally could not finish listening to The Alchemist because the narrator was putting on the most appalling half-assed french accent. I could not care less about France or french culture, but even *I* found it offensive how bad the accent was. It was just unpleasant to listen to. I want a refund.

Any additional comments?

I would like a refund, and whoever did the narration for The Alchemist should be fired, or possibly shot.

5 of 17 people found this review helpful

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  • Mic
  • 12-08-16

Compared with Dreams of Terror and Death

Any additional comments?

Only Dreams of Terror and Death:<br/><br/>The Doom That Came to Sarnath<br/>The Statement of Randolph Carter<br/>The Cats of Ulthar<br/>From Beyond<br/>The Nameless City<br/>The Hound<br/>Pickman's Model<br/>The Dream Quest of Unknown Kaddath<br/>The Silver Key<br/>The Strange High House in the Mist<br/>The Case of Charles Dexter Ward<br/>The Dreams in the Witch House<br/>Through the Gates of the Silver Key<br/><br/>Both:<br/><br/>Azathoth<br/>The Descendant<br/>The Thing in the Moonlight<br/>Polaris<br/>Beyond the Wall of Sleep<br/>Celephais<br/>Nyarlathotep<br/>The Other Gods<br/>Ex Oblivione<br/>The Quest of Iranon<br/>Hypnos<br/>What the Moon Brings<br/><br/>Only Eldritch Tales:<br/><br/>History of the Necronomicon<br/>The Alchemist<br/>A Reminiscence of Dr. Samuel Johnson<br/>The Beast in the Cave<br/>The Poe-et's Nightmare<br/>Memory<br/>Despair<br/>The Picture in the House<br/>Psychopompos; A Tale in Rhyme<br/>The White Ship<br/>The House<br/>The Nightmare Lake<br/>Poetry and the Gods<br/>The Street<br/>Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family<br/>The Crawling Chaos<br/>The Terrible Old Man<br/>The Tree<br/>The Tomb<br/>The Horror at Martin's Beach<br/>The Festival<br/>The Temple<br/>Hallowe'en in a Suburb<br/>The Moon-Bog<br/>He<br/>Festival<br/>The Green Meadow<br/>Nathicana<br/>Two Black Bottles<br/>The Last Test<br/>The Wood<br/>The Ancient Track<br/>The Electric Executioner<br/>Fungi from Yuggoth<br/>The Trap<br/>The Challenge From Beyond<br/>In a Sequester'd Providence Churchyard Where Once Poe Walk'd<br/>Ibid<br/>The Book<br/>The Messenger<br/>The Evil Clergyman<br/>The Very Old Folk<br/>The Transition of Juan Romero<br/>Supernatural Horror in Literature

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

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  • J. Curtis
  • 10-27-16

Great stuff

As the second part of the Necronomicon book I was expecting the last of Lovecraft stories to be included but At the Mountains of Madness is missing and I'm sure still more are missing.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful