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Publisher's Summary

The only book to examine the origins of Scientology's current leader, Ruthless tells the revealing story of David Miscavige's childhood and his path to the head seat of the Church of Scientology, told through the eyes of his father. Ron Miscavige's personal, heartfelt story is a riveting insider's look at life within the world of Scientology.

The introduction of this audiobook is read by the author.

©2016 Ronald T. Miscavige (P)2016 Macmillan Audio

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Ruthlessly Honest ~ An Engrossing Read!

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Even if you've never heard of Scientology, this book would be interesting. Because I was in Scientology, (for many years), I found this book especially fascinating. I believe Ron told his story as truthfully as possible, and in fact, it actually helped me remember some of the reasons I got into Scientology! However, I would never go back, because I know what he writes about is truthful, and what has happened within the group is so sad, and harmful.<br/>I was in it in the 70's and 80's, and got services from a "field auditor". The group was wonderful, and definitely used the "tech" with good intentions. It was a great time!<br/>I'm sorry for the reason Ron decided to write the book, but I'm glad he wrote it.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Well, the author is my favorite character, and I have a lot of respect and affinity for him after hearing his story.

What does Harvey Betancourt bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

I almost always prefer to listen to the author, but I think Mr. Betancourt did a good job reading this one.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

I think the title is perfect as it is.

Any additional comments?

I got out of Scientology because I saw the harmful things that were happening in the organization. I read and listen to information about the "church", because I was personally involved for many years, and I know many of the people talked about. I was especially interested in Ron's story, and I found it fascinating. If I met Ron, I'd give him a Big Hug!

16 of 16 people found this review helpful

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Not very enlightening

There are far better 'exposés' like "Going Clear" and "Troublemaker" about the so called church, I was hoping that as the father of the leader there would be far more salacious insight.. But none that haven't been covered elsewhere (and more effectively) already. Narration & writing are also really quite laborious through most of the book.. It's just ok

10 of 11 people found this review helpful

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I've already "read" this one twice...

Would you listen to Ruthless again? Why?

I'm already on my third time of listening to this book and have listened to it all the way through twice (pretty good since it was just released yesterday). It's an interesting "read" and well done so I find that I listen to it throughout the day, whether driving in my car or working at my desk.

What other book might you compare Ruthless to and why?

I've been reading a lot of the Scientology scandal books so I'd probably compare it to Church of Fear, Troublemaker, Inside Scientology, the few that I own and have listened to a few times already. I just find the topic interesting and keep wondering which of these books it's going to take to wake up the membership to change leaders...maybe this one, this one was pretty disturbing. But since they're pretty much kept from reading or researching things from the outside it's doubtful. But I would like to know if David Miscavige had a chance to read it and what his reaction was. THAT would probably make an interesting read too.

What does Harvey Betancourt bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Actually, I liked the prelude read by Mr. Miscavige himself and probably could have listened to him read it too. As Mr. Betancourt takes over (right after the prelude) it's a little awkward but once he gets going I like his tone and he does make it more interesting. I also find that when I listen to the book, and I've been listening to several of them on this topic by now - I pick up on the similarities or same people from book to book and hearing their names or incidents is easier for me than just reading. Plus I don't always have time to sit down and give my undivided attention to a book but I have plenty of time walking around the mall, driving in my car, or even lying in bed, that I can listen to a book.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

Not really. I was a little horrified to hear that David Miscavige was having his own father trailed by private investigators and told them to let him die and not intervene on his behalf if they thought he was dying. But I've read so much of this by now that I'm not really surprised - but I was surprised that this was his own father. Just one more brick on the wall of truth about this cult.

Any additional comments?

One of the things I liked about this book was the story of Scientology as told from one of the old timers who still had some understanding of and belief in the value of some of the techniques. I don't doubt that somewhere sometime this may have been just one of the many metaphysical self-help techniques of that time, and they really did want to change the world and make it a better place - and there's nothing wrong with that - but the more I read about when David Miscavige took over, the more I realize that that's what went wrong - maybe not the techniques at all. But he definitely seems like a mad cult leader...and I keep wondering what it's going to take to make that known.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

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Cult!

Interesting read
A father's story of his family. This book is written about a family's pain.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

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Straight from the heart. BOOM!

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes. The author really comes from a place of humanity. The sincerity is generous. He isn't on some crusade or standing in some radical corner with a hidden agenda, so the memoir is trust able. Like Leah Remini's book was for me. People, just being people, tell the best stories with humility that is real to other people, just being people. <br/><br/>Mr. Miscavige had to make a tough choice of personal integrity, to share these truths and not sweep them under the rug to "keep the family name" status quo. In this, he sets a good example as a father. As a human.<br/><br/>As someone who was immersed in the entertainment industry for decades, I can say the fact that Mr. Miscavige was a charismatic and talented musician, and also very attractive, and he managed to keep that family together and that marriage together for so long, was a monumental accomplishment. It was not beneath him to knock on doors and sell products to put food on the table and provide for that brood. I believe they were Catholics. <br/><br/>He admits to smacking his wife and spanking his kids but I can tell you, in that time period, that was a norm. That was coal mining country and I spent time in W. Va. during that time. Every family lived like that. They fought, but they did not walk out or abandon their people. I think Mr. Miscavige had personal moral codes that transcended the ones laid out in the Scientology culture. And these were a matter of personal honor and personal integrity for him.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Ron Miscavige. He didn't need a leave of absence from Humanity to explore Scientology. Humanity is bigger than Scientology. And I think any reasonable exploration of the ideas in Scientology, would need humanity to rest on, otherwise it becomes another man's inhumanity to man. Which is what that culture has become at this time.

What does Harvey Betancourt bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Sound. I didn't have to use the voices in my head.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

I was really moved on every page.

Any additional comments?

His son is accusing him of writing the book to "make a buck" off him. His father though paved the way for his son's career. Apparently he lives like a rock star. The last time his father needed money, his son cut him a check for 100K. He could have gone back to his son for more money. So it is hard to think this was the purpose behind the book. Mr. Miscavige I think, did not want blood money. If he is making money, it is on his own back, he had to live that life. It mattered to a lot of people, including all of his kids, that he did live that life. <br/><br/>To think your father's meaning is all about you, is quite self absorbed if not narcissistic. His life has meaning of it's own, aside from his son. Real meaning, because his father has leaned largely on humanity, to survive. To provide. The story is really a success story. About person integrity. Infinite honor. Duty to mankind, all of them. Not just a select few in an exclusive membership. <br/><br/>Many people live their entire lives and never have to make a critical decision. This is a good story to know about, in the event you are pushed into a corner, to know it is always possible, to rise rise up and "do the right thing", against terrible forces compelling you in the other direction. <br/><br/>And when you make choices that are good for humanity, and you hold your ground on being humane, you make the world a better place for everyone. Even those who may be inconvenienced by truth.<br/><br/>This man has managed to live with grace and honor, dignity and humanity, among others who could not. <br/><br/>It is these beings that keep the porch light on, in this dark vast space called, the twilight zone.

13 of 16 people found this review helpful

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VERY INSIGHTFUL POWERFUL ENDING

This is a great insight into the structure and mental framework in the Sea Org (Scientology's elite paramilitary group) that keeps the machine going.

I highly recommend this to anyone interested in learning about the dark inner workings and enslavement that binds Scientology's most dedicated parishioners to their work.

The book really shows the reality of the most dedicated Sea Org members and how their day to day life is different than the Scientology dictator/supreme leader David Miscavige.

It also covers in depth the harsh family shredding policy enforced by the church known as disconnection.

Having been a Scientologist myself and having had direct experience with this destructive and abusive practice I can vouch with absolute certainty that this information is accurate.

This book will serve as a wild wake up call to those unfamiliar with the church's abusive practices, and just how far it will go to manipulate and control its followers.



2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Wonderful

This the number one book that every one should read who have or has any interest in learning about scientology. Beautiful written by Ronald Miscavige, the father of the David Miscarriage. The leader of this cult. A MUST READ YOU WON'T BE DISAPPOINTED...... NAMASTE to Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Miscavige for sharing your difficult story so honest and open, I know it could not have been easy.

8 of 10 people found this review helpful

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kept me engaged.

I was eager to listen to this book after watching Leah Remini"s special outing Scientology.
it did not disappoint. easy to follow and engaging. This is the author's experience. The accpunt is full of information ( some not so pretty)into the crooked world of a cult hiding g behind the guise of religion

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Interesting and informative

I found this book to be honest and easy to listen to. I feel like Ron is a friend and I was sad to have the book end. Thank you for your honesty and openness about this crazy so called church.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Very enlightening and Very sad

Very Sad that this is even called a church. To much power given to anyone cause evil intent!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful