Regular price: $22.99

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

One of the world's 50 living autistic savants is the first and only to tell his compelling and inspiring life story and explain how his incredible mind works.

Worldwide, there are fewer than 50 living savants, those autistic individuals who can perform miraculous mental calculations or artistic feats. (Think Dustin Hoffman's character in Rain Man.) Until now, none of them has been able to discuss his or her thought processes, much less write a book. Daniel Tammet is the first.

Tammet's problems were apparent from childhood. He was shunned by his classmates and often resorted to rocking and humming quietly. Yet he could memorize almost anything, and his math and language skills were astonishing. By high school, Daniel was diagnosed as autistic, and he began to discover his own superhuman abilities: calculating huge sums in his head in seconds, learning new languages in one week, and memorizing more than 22,000 digits of pi.

With heart-melting simplicity and astonishing self-awareness, Born on a Blue Day tells Daniel's story: from his childhood frustrations to adult triumphs, while explaining how his mind works. He thinks in pictures. He sees numbers as complex shapes: 37 is lumpy like porridge; 89 reminds him of falling snow. Today, Daniel has emerged as one of the world's most fascinating minds and inspiring stories. His brain has amazed scientists for years, and everyone will be moved by his remarkable life story.

©2007 Daniel Tammet; (P)2007 Tantor Media Inc.

Critic Reviews

"[Tanmet's] ability to express himself clearly and with a surprisingly engaging tone (given his symptoms) makes for an account that will intrigue." (Publishers Weekly)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.0 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    236
  • 4 Stars
    223
  • 3 Stars
    133
  • 2 Stars
    37
  • 1 Stars
    17

Performance

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    127
  • 4 Stars
    77
  • 3 Stars
    41
  • 2 Stars
    6
  • 1 Stars
    3

Story

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    119
  • 4 Stars
    85
  • 3 Stars
    36
  • 2 Stars
    12
  • 1 Stars
    6
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Ira
  • Indianapolis, IN, United States
  • 04-21-12

Thank you Daniel for you taught me much!

What did you love best about Born on a Blue Day?

I had thought that I would learn more about savants, which is a subject I have found of great interest. This book was much more than that to me. Let me state here that I am not autistic, or am I a savant, yet I found so much in Daniel that is me.The book has taught me much about myself.I unlike other reviewers find Daniel not to be at all self-indulgent instead being honest, very honest! This I am afraid is a virtue which is not as common today as it could, and should be.Those who read this book and who did not find the value of this within it I believe missed the purpose and meaning of it's writing. A wonderful story interesting and with great purpose.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Interesting story

Any additional comments?

I had never read the print version, but the Audible edition was an interesting story that helps make a person think about the way their mind works.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • C.
  • 04-07-12

Not what it promises to be

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

An actual good book about what goes on the head of a savant.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

He didn't. He is as boring as the book.

Any additional comments?

This book presents absolutely no insight about the mind of a savant. It is a story about a shy, nerd, gay guy, like most shy, nerd, gay guys I know. There is nothing special or exciting about this character. You will meet dozens like him in any CS, physics or math departments of any university in the world.

The book

  • Overall

A Very Interesting Read...

just short of the Temple Grandin books, which are much more involved and penetrating. There are times in the book when the experiences he describes are incredibly mundane, and in a book so short, one expects more of the dynamic and unusual aspects of Tammet's life. Still, a four out of five.

  • Overall
  • Stephen
  • phoenix, AZ, United States
  • 10-09-08

my story

I always love to hear these "my story" types. It is fun to know other kinds of people, especially the more gifted of us. I am particularly fond of logical thinkers. Unfortunately Mr Tammet ends on a sour note.
Overall, however, not too bad.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Slow, very slow!

The first couple hours of the book were pretty dry, as the author goes into excruciating detail of his childhood, (which I was surprised to learn was not that eventful or interesting). However, his adult life is somewhat fascinating. I had to skip some chapters of the cd of his early years. Also, the cd's are not divided up well at all. The cd will end in mid-sentence.

0 of 3 people found this review helpful