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The Audible editors have fallen in love with Lisa Brennan-Jobs's memoir. Here's why.

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"As someone who was raised by a single mother around the same time—West Coast, the salads they eat—all that stuff really brings me to that time and place that’s familiar to me, and makes me feel less alone. The struggles she had in life were familiar to me, and I often had to stop myself and go, 'oh yeah, her dad is Steve Jobs.'"—Courtney, Audible editor

"Memoirs are my jam! I can be pretty picky about memoirs, and this just, it took the words out of my mouth, it took my breath away, it showed me new depths to memoir that I didn’t even know existed. It’s a really special memoir—and we hope you’ll enjoy it, and that it will speak to you as much as it did to us."—Rachel, Audible editor

"Narrator Eileen Stevens is wonderful. There are very few narrators who really are able to strike that tone where she’s embodying this person, she’s embodying her story in a way that feels—I know we like this word a lot, but—it’s authentic. It feels real."—Abby, Audible editor

Publisher's Summary

A frank, smart, and captivating memoir by the daughter of Apple founder Steve Jobs

Born on a farm and named in a field by her parents - artist Chrisann Brennan and Steve Jobs - Lisa Brennan-Jobs' childhood unfolded in a rapidly changing Silicon Valley. When she was young, Lisa's father was a mythical figure who was rarely present in her life. As she grew older, her father took an interest in her, ushering her into a new world of mansions, vacations, and private schools. His attention was thrilling, but he could also be cold, critical, and unpredictable. When her relationship with her mother grew strained in high school, Lisa decided to move in with her father, hoping he'd become the parent she'd always wanted him to be.

Small Fry is Lisa Brennan-Jobs' poignant story of a childhood spent between two imperfect but extraordinary homes. Scrappy, wise, and funny, young Lisa is an unforgettable guide through her parents' fascinating and disparate worlds. Part portrait of a complex family, part love letter to California in the '70s and '80s, Small Fry is an enthralling audiobook by an insightful new literary voice.

©2018 Lisa Brennan-Jobs (P)2018 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

You feel as though you are there.

The author has a beautiful way of describing her memories. She crafts her words in such a way that you feel you are there.

She comes across very authentic. Not only does she share her perspective of her father, but all of the adults in her life. She doesn’t shy away from her own embarrassing moments either.

This book is very much about every child brought up during this same time period with a single mother. There are many parallels to my own childhood. Brilliantly written!

13 of 15 people found this review helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars

Thesaurus Overkill

I’m returning the book after only listening an hour. It grinds on my nerves to read such minute details about events happening before someone is old enough to remember them and the plethora of memories were disjointed, irrelevant and too full of unnecessary adjectives. Narration was awful, 4 words, pause, 4 words, pause.

21 of 27 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Most honest look at Steve Jobs I have read.

Lisa portrays both of her parents as only a child could. Both of her parents are incredibly flawed and at times I found myself angry at them both. However, by the end she had made peace and the reader does as well. I felt sorry for Steve most of all. He missed it and he regretted it.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Beautifully Lyrical Prose...Albeit a Bit Entitled

Lisa Brennan-Jobs’s memoir is accomplished in its prose, symbolism, and sentiment. Consequently, while I thoroughly believe she had an emotionally tumultuous childhood - her story is often difficult to connect to the reader’s experience. The narrator comes off as often spoiled, completely entitled, and out-of-touch, much like the father she often maligns.

7 of 9 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

A short story made very long

So Lisa Brennan-Jobs had a story to tell (her dad neglected her while she was growing up) that many, many people have to tell. She took this simple story and stretched it out with strange detail and self-absorption. We get it...he wasn't a good dad. But 12 hours of the whining.

8 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars

Steve Jobs was a Jerk

This is really a sad story.

Deadbeat daddy, Steve Jobs really was an unstable monster to everyone around him, including his children, once he bothered to acknowledge that they were his.

It would have been fascinating to see the modern #MeToo movement put Steve Jobs in proper historical context and take him down a few notches. But this sad book keeps him hoisted high on that absurd pedestal, even as it details his emotional atrocities.

I found myself fast-forwarding more and more before giving up halfway through. I get it. Sadness and entitlement are neighbors in Silicon Valley, but they kinda deserve each other.

8 of 11 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

A beautiful, poignant, thoughtful and devastating memoir

I listened to this much of the time with my mouth wide open. Agape at Lisa's telling of brutal, heartbreaking tales of her upbringing, filled with beautiful prose. She has uncannily observed her own life and put it in a story that will teach you about growth, love and all of its complexity. The perspective of a child thirsting for attention and love and her observations of the adults are both beautifully written and thought provoking. I was moved by this book very deeply.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Simply Awesome

I’ve read and listened to a lot of books ... This one is one of my favorites. Beautifully written, touching and beautiful. I never thought of Steve as bad just as a human and Lisa as a kid growing through the trials and tribulations of growing up. Thank you for sharping your staring with us Lisa. I have two kids I don’t live with and live far apart from... touched me so deeply.

Truly an amazing book. Simply awesome! Thank you!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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  • 612pab
  • Minneapolis, MN
  • 10-01-18

Great Voice Acting. Terrible Story

Lisa Brennan-Jobs spends an inordinate amount of time describing scenes- the utter crap of details she demands per every encounter is a waste of time. My time.
The story boils down to this.
Daddy Issues
I would like the reader believe I am accomplished without the Jobs name (whatever, Harvard took it into consideration).
School wasn't challenging enough...
Eames Chairs
Therapist.
She tries to make the reader believe that she is completly aloof.
She finds out after her ivy league education and Bono intervenes that the computer her dad designed when she was born called "LISA" was named after her.

Really, you won't take much from the book other than learning steve jobs, from Lisa's point of view is kind of a pervert.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Well Told Story

This is Insight that allows you to see how people almost can’t help but be themselves. So much so that it is hard to blame someone for the choices they feel compelled to make in the moment. This is really a well told story that allows for enjoyment and understanding in a situation that might otherwise bring sadness. Go on the journey you’ll be glad you did.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful