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Publisher's Summary

Our ability to remake our world is unique among all living things. But where does our creativity come from, how does it work, and how can we harness it to improve our lives, schools, businesses, and institutions?

The Runaway Species is a deep-dive into the creative mind, a celebration of the human spirit, and a vision of how we can improve our future by understanding and embracing our ability to innovate. Composer Anthony Brandt and neurologist David Eagleman seek to discover what lies at the heart of humanity's ability - and drive - to create.

Examining hundreds of examples of human creativity, Brandt and Eagleman draw out what creative acts have in common and view them through the lens of cutting-edge neuroscience, uncovering the essential elements of this critical human ability and encouraging a more creative future for all of us.

©2017 David Eagleman (P)2017 Dreamscape Media, LLC

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creativity: Breaking, Blending, Bending.

Elegantly simple thesis, deconstructing the human creative process into three discrete, interrelated processes. If you like Pinker, Gladwell, Dawkins, Harari, then Runaway Species is required reading.

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endless list of historical facts or items

Maybe there are some good points in the book but it is filled with very long lists of frivolous of items or historical facts. I am giving up trying to listen to it after the first few chapters. The percentage of irrelevant material is very high. So the book becomes major waste of time.