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Editorial Reviews

H.G. Wells's classic horror story centers around monster-making. As the tale begins, the nephew of Edward Prendick is narrating from an account written by his uncle as a old man. While in the prime of life, the shipwrecked Prendick was saved from death by Dr. Moreau, an expatriate living on a deserted island who was attempting, by surgical experiments, to humanize animals. Through Prebble's narrative mastery the character of Prendick evolves with the events he describes. The opening chapter is performed in a dry, weary voice. As Prendick describes the animals' agony and the misshapen results of the "man-making," Prebble reads in a shadowy, intense tone, conveying events too horrible and unbelievable to describe. Prebble's narration makes the story visual and visceral.

Publisher's Summary

Written by H.G. Wells, the great visionary author, this legendary novel is both timeless and thought provoking. Listeners will thrill to this chilling masterpiece as man boldly takes evolution into his own hands for the first time. Dr. Moreau, a scientist expelled from his homeland for his cruel experiments, continues his transplantations on a small South Pacific island, creating hideous creatures with manlike intelligence. When the island’s human/beasts revolt, the true consequences of his genetic meddling emerge. This stunning novel introduces listeners to the potential perils and gains of scientific discovery. H.G. Wells, author of the science fiction novels The War of the Worlds, The Invisible Man, and The Island of Dr. Moreau, remains the standard by which modern fantasy authors are judged.

Public Domain (P)1996 Recorded Books

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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this story is so cool

The narrator was awesome and the story is really cool! I was forced to read this for school but I ended up really loving it!!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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An Oldie but a Goodie

I have to admit, this book actually exceeded my expectations. The narrator did a great job setting the tone of the story's era and bringing the classic Victorian masterpiece to life. If you are a fan of the HP Lovecraft audio books, I think you will enjoy these as well.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Dr Jekyl, I presume?

A powerful novel in it's day (1896) and still great fantasy/sci-fi...even if the science is a bit dated, it's still fun. On an island in the Pacific Ocean, the evil Moreau conducts grizzly experiments while the able assistant drinks himself into oblivion and the newcomer watches this queer drama. This would make a great movie---wait, there have been five made of this plot/theme. I'll go find one and watch it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Good narration, disturbing tale

This is one of HG Wells' more disturbing tales. I can't say I'm really in love with it, like I am with "War of the Worlds" or "The Invisible Man" (or some of his short stories like "The Truth about Pyecraft" or "In the Abyss"). Dr Moreau isn't a deliberate sadist, he just doesn't care; under his knife, animals not only suffer terrible physical agonies; they suffer a complete corruption and destruction of their essential nature. I found it more depressing even than the bleak vision of "The Time Machine."

That said, Simon Prebble does an excellent job with the narration.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Thought provoking and engrossing.

If you could sum up The Island of Dr. Moreau in three words, what would they be?

Thought Provoking<br/>Engrossing<br/>Real

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Island of Dr. Moreau?

[spoiler] When Prindig first came into the hut with the law giver reading the law.

Which scene was your favorite?

When Dr. Moreau was explaining his philosophy behind what he was doing. It made sense, and yet you knew how horrible and unnatural it was, like many modern medical practices.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Who will decide The Law?

Any additional comments?

HG Wells embedded so much meaning and realism in this story that it was hard to set aside. I am still thinking about it.<br/>Simon Prebble's narration is extraordinary. He breathes even more life into each of these characters, which I love. Yet, he doesn't over act or try to dramatize the story. His presentation is just right.

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Unexpected

I went into this book ready to be terrified of it. It was unnerving at times, but I didn't flinch at it. It was a good story and the performer was great!

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Wonderful

I throughly enjoyed this story! The narrator was great. I need to watch the movie now to see how well they stuck to the script. I remember seeing the movie on the making of The Island of Dr. Moreau and all the problems that occurred. It will be so much more rewarding now that I have listened to the original story.

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Haunting story

Would you listen to The Island of Dr. Moreau again? Why?

I'd definitely listen again - its a bit too dry to be my go-to sci-fi book, but the descriptions are haunting to imagine, both of the people and the non. I actually enjoyed that no character in this story was good, redeemable, or even sympathetic, and that the author never attempts to portray them as such. The narrator does a good job with pacing and with setting the scene you're meant to be engrossed in.

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A classic for a good reason

I read this in high school, but the rereading with audible was a lot of fun. The story made me think about fate vs choice, animal vs human. it was also surprisingly funny. Narrator was excellent at conveying both the pathos of the animal men and the silliness of the upper class Englishmen trying to be gods.

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Good but not Wells' best

Any additional comments?

Normally I love H.G. Wells but this was, in my honest opinion, one of his weaker books. I find the concepts and the structure well done but I don't find that I care all that much for any of the characters, the only exception being the encounter in the forest after "the incident". The narrator did a good job but I'm hard pressed to say it was a great performance. I listened to it once and that was enough for me. I'll stick to War of the Worlds.