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Publisher's Summary

Following her record-breaking debut trilogy, Ann Leckie, winner of the Hugo, Nebula, Arthur C. Clarke, and Locus Awards, returns with an enthralling new novel of power, theft, privilege, and birthright.

A power-driven young woman has just one chance to secure the status she craves and regain priceless lost artifacts prized by her people. She must free their thief from a prison planet from which no one has ever returned.

Ingray and her charge will return to her home world to find their planet in political turmoil, at the heart of an escalating interstellar conflict. Together, they must make a new plan to salvage Ingray's future, her family, and her world before they are lost to her for good.

For more from Ann Leckie, check out:

  • Imperial Radch
  • Ancillary Justice
  • Ancillary Sword
  • Ancillary Mercy

©2017 Ann Leckie (P)2017 Hachette Audio

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
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Performance

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Story

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
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  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Worth it as an audiobook

Adjoa Andoh's narration is unbelievable, among the best I've ever heard. I loved Ancillary Justice (as a printed book, have not heard the audio version), but all the followups were only okay. The story here is also only okay, kind of repetitive and political, meaning it makes a whole lot out of very small actions and events. But it's a very interesting, original universe.

I did find the monologue from the Geck ambassador very moving. I'm not sure whether or not I would have in print. I'm still thinking about it days later.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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A departure from the ancillary novels

At first I was a bit disappointed because ancillary justice was not a main character in this novel. Neither were the sentient ships main characters. This is a novel which concerns other worlds in the universe where ancillary justice lives. The novel is actually quite interesting and I enjoyed it. The characters basically are one of privilege and one not so privileged. Also there is a great mystery involved in the story; I love good mysteries and I find that they tend to flesh out characters well. I recommend this book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Great book, great performance

I really enjoyed the Ancillary series, but this book was actually better even though being much smaller in scope. Also, the performance of Adjoa Andoh was absolutely excellent. I recommend this to anyone who enjoys sci fi.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Story

Subtly complex political machinations

Ann Leckie's Provenance is a complex, but richly engrossing tale that begins simply, but gradually evolves to a highly involved and complex fandango. Ingray is an adopted daughter of a politically powerful mother who is unlikely to share in much of the next generation's bounty. She crafts a plan to engineer the prison escape of a convict to run a scam on her brother, the heir apparent. Problems arise immediately and while Ingray is playing catch-up, larger forces are at play that result in involvement by a non-human intelligence as well as foreign invaders trying to gain control of her planet that just happens to sit in a favorable position for trade routes.

The sci-elements are varied, but muted with regards to the overall plot. There is clearly interstellar FTL drives, sophisticated drones, and non-human aliens with unusual, but intriguing social customs. Political complexity dominates. Of particular note is a societal penchant for "vestiges" which are tokens of historical interest such as old documents or autographs. Ingray is not so much a reluctant hero as much as someone not quite sure of what to do next, but with excellent instincts.

The narration is good, but suffers a bit with a noticeable accent. Pacing, tone, and mood are well attended. Of note, is Leckie's use of the ambiguous "e" instead of he or she randomly that adds some confusion, not so much as to the gender, but rather to simply which character is speaking.

6 of 9 people found this review helpful

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The narrator uses very odd accents for some characters for no reason.

I find it very hard to enjoy the book because some of the voices the narrator uses involve vocal fry and strange consonant and vowel pronunciation.

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

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Difficult to care

I give this book a try, listen for a few hours. Phone my mind drifting while listening to this in any setting. In the car, in the office. There’s nothing much interesting about any of the characters to capture attention.I mean sure, collecting intrigue should be interesting? But I kept asking myself why do I care about these people and the answer was always I don’t.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Anthony
  • Alexandria, VA, United States
  • 12-23-17

Mediocre narration, bad recording, bad story

This book very heavy-handedly tries to be "woke" on the issue of gender identity, but then seems to be utterly unaware of how many ways it fails to be so in many other regards. I am totally in favor of depicting futures where society is more accepting of all people, but even the choice of gender-neutral pronouns in this work sound very awkward in the mouth of the narrator, as if the author never stopped to say them out loud when imagining how future people would use them. There are multiple places where the narrator audibly trips over the words.

The story concerns a woman who is a member of a future aristocratic dynasty, and even though there are mentions of "elections", it is very clear this future society is controlled by powerful families who pass power down through heredity and the elections are only between members of these powerful families. In some stories, that might be a thing the author was *criticisng* as a failing, but this story delves so much into familial intrigues, dealing with paparazzi and the privileges of power and treats them with quite a longing gaze, rather than really ever in any way depicting them as undesirable. The attitude of the protagonist is very much, "Oh, woe is me, it's so hard being a member of one of the most powerful families in the galaxy!"

Beyond that, the voices the narrator chooses for characters seem to both be all at random and also at times quite culturally insensitive. All the members *of the same families*, for instance, seem to have different accents, while humans who grew up living with aliens are just randomly given heavy-handed stereotypical Asian accents, On top of that, the voice recording sounds as if it were done using an iPhone microphone and then someone tried to fix it using noise gates in the post-processing, so there is this very obvious point at the end of each spoken word or phrase where the background noise cuts off to silence, and then it comes back on again when the narrator begins speaking again.

The only reason I give this two stars instead of one is that there are some imaginative elements in the future technology the author created, and the narrator actually does a fairly good job when *not* doing heavily stereotyped accents, so there is clearly talent present in the creators of this work, but I feel both the author and the narrator seriously missed the mark here.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Excellent voice acting and great standalone novel

This is an awesome story and a great first entry into Ann Leckie's books, if anyone is intimidated by their Ancillary Trilogy. Set in the same universe, this book does a great job bringing the galaxy together without feeling like it retreads old ground.

Adjoa Andoh makes an amazing voice presence and breathes life into a world that is familiar and not. I was a little worried I'd struggle with their transition into a different character but their voice work doesn't allow for much confusion, with what feels like a full cast of characters all together.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Like coming home

With 3 books in this universe, it is odd to think of this as a sophomore work, but it was a delight.
Compelling addition to the Ancillary series and leafy me aching for more.

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  • E Wagner
  • PORTLAND, OR, United States
  • 02-03-18

Loved the protagonist!

Often, I find female-hero-protagonists right now to all be in the "Katniss" tough-as-nails kick-ass mold. Which is fine. But Ingray, with her foibles and her sweetness and her more subtle brilliance is a very refreshing heroine. I found her and the other characters around her to be extremely likable and fascinating. I was glad I read the Ancillary books first because it gave me good context for where to place the story, but I would be interested to hear from someone who read this without having that context... I see that Adjoa Andoh has received mixed reviews for her narration, but I found her wide variety of accents and voices to add depth that I think reflects the diversity of the setting-- all these different types of humans and non-humans from different worlds jumbled up together. It works really well.