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Publisher's Summary

Centuries have passed since civilization's brush with apocalypse. The world's greatest threats have all been silenced. There is no anger, no hatred, no war. There is only perfect peace...and fear. A terrible secret was closely guarded for centuries: every single soul walking the earth, though in appearance totally normal, is actually dead, long ago genetically stripped of true humanity.

Nine years have gone by since an unlikely hero named Rom Sebastian first discovered a secret and consumed an ancient potion of blood to bring himself back to life in Forbidden. Surviving against impossible odds, Rom has gathered a secret faction of followers who have also taken the blood - the first Mortals in a world that is dead.

On the heels of Forbidden comes Mortal, the second novel in The Books of Mortals saga penned by Ted Dekker and Tosca Lee. Set in a terrifying, medieval future, where grim pageantry masks death, this tale of dark desires and staggering stakes peels back the layers of the heart for all who dare take the journey.

The Books of Mortals are three novels, each of which stands on its own, yet all are seamlessly woven into one epic thriller.

©2012 Ted Dekker, Tosca Lee (P)2012 Hachette Audio

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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Another Solid Hit for Dekker & Lee

Obviously, this is a continuation in the BoM series. If you liked the first one, you'll like this one. Ted sticks with his tried-and-true blood/life-corpse/death formula (goes back to his original trilogy) and it still works for me. On the critical side, I felt the writing was just a bit sloppy in places (although they were little things I would have expected an editor to pick up on, rather than the author). And I find Henry Leyva a bit of a disappointment as a narrator. He's both overly-precise and a bit mushy, if that's possible. And there were a number of noticeable mispronunciations (for example, the word "inauguration" is used extensively in both books and he just never gets it right). I prefer my narrators to either be a big plus (George Guidall, Will Patton or in the case of someone who has done several of Ted's other books...Tim Gregory), but I find Leyva to be a bit of a distraction. Still, enjoyed it tremendously, and will certainly be listening to the third in the series when it's available.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Joseph
  • Barton, NY, USA
  • 03-11-13

Thought provoking book

An abstract book that is a great though-provoking book. Easy book to get lost in. The previous book in the series is not necessary, but I would recommend "reading" that before "reading" this one.

Enjoy!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Really belongs in the fantasy section

Mortal picks up 9 years after Forbidden ended. Jonathan has now reached the age to claim his title as Sovereign. With only a few more days to wait, all the best laid plans crumble. Saric has been busy and manages to find the cyroperserved Feyn. Saric then uses his blood to transfuse Feyn, restore her to the living, and her assuming the role of Sovereign. Jonathan meanwhile has spent his last 9 years serving as a blood donor to hundreds of nomads. At the same time, Saric has been doing the same and creating his own special army with global dominance hanging in the balance.

Any science fiction elements have gone by the wayside with this sequel. There is the constant juxtaposition of technology capable of cyroperservation with a Medieval aspect to living conditions. 500 hundred years in the future means never having to type and match blood either. A transfusion from Jonathan provides for superhuman strength, speed, senses and immortality as well. Also, all walking corpses have a distinct odor. Saric's blood is qualitatively similar, but not as good, but it does offer the added benefit that recipients become dog-like loyal and regard Saric as their "maker." Rom continues his quest of trying to put Jonathan on the throne, but never develops a clear sense of what that means or what happens after. None of the characters possess endearing qualities and are mostly one-dimensional.

As the tale evolves, it becomes clear that the biblical metaphor is calling the shots. Jonathan plays a Messiah figure (with drink my blood replaced by inject my blood). At the end, there is little resolution, much confusion, and greater dissension within the ranks. At the same time, the blood thing evolves into something even stranger. It will be interesting to see how this trilogy will resolve what appears to be complete collapse of the thrust of the first 2 books.

The narration is well executed with good pacing and an enjoyable delivery.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Mortal

Great book
Great story
Great ending
Great acts
Great biblical reference
I love the story behind the store

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Inspiring!!!

This three book series was wonderfully written and masterfully performed to create a striking parallel to the struggle of Christ and the Christian Life. As Rom and his three friends struggled to understand the destiny that have been dropped in their laps, an amazing journey unfolds before them. It not only affects them but will come to influence every living being on the face of the Earth. As they search for truth and meaning, one figure stands at the center; young boy named Jonathan. As he grows into his destiny, protected by those that believe, many struggles come to play. A dark and unflinching evil threatens to destroy everything they have sacrificed so much for. It is Jonathan and the unfailing true belief of those closest to him that prevail, even though they themselves struggle to hold on, doubtful, wondering if there really is a reason for all that has happened. The resulting climax is so poignant and meaningful that , whether you believe or not, you will know that there is so much more to this life then we can see with just our eyes. We must simply know it in our hearts and Love Unconditionally.

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Slow and loopy

I like Dekker books, but this one was off. some of it was the performance, but some of it was the writing.

At points the story felt forced, and at others like a different person was writing it.

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  • Freeman
  • SAN DIEGO, CA, United States
  • 12-27-14

good story, bad writing/dialog

i'm sure i couldn't do any better, but it sure seemed like the writing and dialog was written for young kids at times. the characters don't seem to have a lot of depth and somethings just flat out didn't make sense to me. i won't be listening to book 3.

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Powerful !

What did you love best about Mortal?

The story and analogy and spiritual implication. I pray I never forget this revelation of our maker.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Ram. - because I related to him.

Have you listened to any of Henry Leyva’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

yes, absolutely fantastic.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

When ram drank jonathans blood after he died.

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Best Read in a Year!

Where does Mortal rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Among the top 10

What did you like best about this story?

That it had a rang of truth about it and how cold the world has become.

Which character – as performed by Henry Leyva – was your favorite?

Avra because she represented a strength and devotion young women lack today.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Avra's death was moving

Any additional comments?

The first book (Forbidden) as well as this one are well written and draws one into the tale. I felt I was a part of the story not just reading it.

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Surprisingly good sequel to Forbidden.

Although this sequel takes place nine years after Forbidden, Dekker & Lee write a smooth transition with well-placed reminders. They introduce several new characters that interact with the old ones and further develop the ideas in the the first book. The story is somewhat of an allegory of the gospel but doesn't parallel it. It reminds me of the Circle Trilogy. If you enjoyed those books, you'll probably enjoy these as well.