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Publisher's Summary

The system of theology known as Calvinism has been immensely influential for the past five hundred years, but it is often encountered negatively as a fatalistic belief system that confines human freedom and renders human action and choice irrelevant. Taking us beyond the caricatures, Michael Horton invites us to explore the teachings of Calvinism, also commonly known as Reformed theology, by showing us how it is biblical and God-centered, leading us to live our lives for the glory of God.

Horton explores the historical roots of Calvinism, walking readers through the distinctive known as the 'Five Points,' and encouraging us to consider its rich resources for faith and practice in the 21st Century. As a companion to Roger Olson's Against Calvinism, readers will be able to compare contrasting perspectives and form their own opinions on the merits and weaknesses of Calvinism.

©2011 Michael S. Horton (P)2011 Zondervan

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  • Story

A must listen for both sides...

Once though myself as an Arminian... now thinking Molinist....

The issues I have with Calvinism weren't all addressed, but this book cleared up a lot of misunderstanding.

My problem is really hearing Calvinists and thinking "yea, I agree with most of the things you say..."

Then hearing Arminians and thinking "I agree with even more of what you say..."

I honestly believe the truth is somewhere in the middle... which Molinism seems to be where it lies...

This will be one of the great questions answered by the Messiah when we are all standing in our glorified bodies before Him...

  • Overall

Fair to both sides

This book is very fair to both sides of the debate. Even though I strongly disagree with the view in this book, it is still a fair representation of Calvinism as a whole.

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  • Performance
  • Story

Great Book and Great Narrator!

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes. It is clear and concise and is informational for anyone wanting to study the subject or know how to better address these issues.

What did you like best about this story?

The Narrator was fantastic. I could listen to him all day long. Kind of like listening to Alistair Begg, but the narrator doesn't have an accent.

Have you listened to any of Maurice England’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

No, but I will definitely listen to more as long as they contain such deep and accurate theological content.

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  • Performance
  • Story
  • Paul
  • United States
  • 01-29-12

Succinct and Worth Any Christian's Time

Michael Horton's book is a very tight summary of the basics of Calvinism. He uses the basic structure of T.U.L.I.P. (though he has changed some of the point names and ends up with T.U.P.E.P.) to walk the reader through Calvinism with a great variety of points of view and arguing for his own understanding. Speaking as an MDiv student studying Theology, this is a great introduction and should be easily understandable to any person looking to learn more about Calvinism.
I highly recommend reading this book along with Roger Olson's Against Calvinism for a balanced view on the strengths and weaknesses of this view.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Performance
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Good, but not great

I got this to see how Horton presented his case as opposed to Roger Olson's in "Against Calvinism." While Olson I thought was more personal (against those who hold to Calvinism) while presenting his case, I found myself not listening to his message as openly as I might have otherwise. Horton on the other hand didn't appear to really offer a case for Calvinism, rather his perspective (at least what I got out of it) of what Calvinism should be. It just didn't seem to me to be a case for Calvinism, which was very disappointing considering that Michael Horton was the author.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful