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Publisher's Summary

Where Do We Go From Here is a selection from A Call to Conscience, a milestone collection of Dr. King's most influential and best-known speeches. Presented here with an introduction written and read by Senator Edward M. Kennedy.

Compiled by Stanford historian Dr. Clayborne Carson, director of the King Papers Project, and by contributing editor Kris Shepard, A Call to Conscience takes you behind the scenes on an astonishing historical journey, from the small, crowded church in Montgomery, Alabama, where "The Birth of a New Nation" ignited the modern civil rights movement; to the center of the nation's capital, where "I Have a Dream" echoed through a nation's conscience; to the Mason Temple in Memphis, where over 10,000 people heard Dr. King give his last, transcendent speech, "I've Been to the Mountaintop", the night before his assassination. In 12 important introductions, some of the world's most renowned leaders and theologians, Andrew Young, His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Senator Edward M. Kennedy, and Mrs. Rosa Parks, among others, share with you their reflections on these speeches and give priceless firsthand testimony on the events that inspired their delivery.

Expressing a deeply felt faith in democracy, the power of loving change, and a self-deprecating humor, A Call to Conscience is Dr. King speaking today. It is a unique, unforgettable record of the words that rallied millions, forever changed the face of America, and even today shape our deepest personal hopes and dreams for the future.

©2001 The Estate of Martin Luther King, Jr., All Rights Reserved (P)2006 Intellectual Properties Management, Inc.

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  • Overall
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powerful

MLK. has always been powerful and I will always be thankful for the example he left for me to follow.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Timeless!

Every American should listen to Martin Luther King's speech. His words are as valuable in modern times (2009) as when he first spoke them.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Brilliant orator.

I'm listening to this on the 50th anniversary of his assassination. His speeches are moving and still relevant today. There is a lot we can learn from him.

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Monumental...King is TIMELESS!

MLK chronicles the undying willingness of the black man in America and tools and social strategies to eliminate injustice.

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Same issues still plague us

Dr. King's analysis and insights were spot on and are enduring decades later as America continues to struggle with issues of race, poverty, and power dynamics.

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A Comprehensive King

We often learn MLK as a caricature created by individuals with agendas. These speeches present a compassionate, educated, religious, militant, humble, subversive, entrepreneurial and complex man. Praise God!

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The past re-visits us now....

Very powerful speech from Dr. King. You would think you're listening to a speech about the current racial issues we have currently.

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Right Up There With Some Of King's Best Work!

Sen. Edward Kennedy makes a wonderful introduction with “Where Do We Go from Here”, one of the landmark speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

This is one of King’s best speeches as he talks to America and the American Negroes about where do they go from here.

King is encouraging voter registration drives, he’s encouraging than they grow to straighten up and stand tall because “a man cannot ride your back if you stand up straight”.

He is also talking about community reinvestment acts for banks and homeownership for more people. King was way of ahead of his time it seems as he inspires people to begin thinking on these things. He applauded the new homeownership bill that was recently introduced at that time.

Also King was involved with Operation Breadbasket and he spoke frequently and strongly of black owned banks.
 
Below are some great quotes from this sermon as delivered by Martin Luther King Jr.

“The Negro still lives in the basement of the great Society” – Martin Luther King Junior

“Due to what has been done to the Negro through the ages, he has no resources for which to better his existence in America” – Martin Luther King Junior

“The Negro is still at the bottom, despite the few who had penetrated to slightly higher levels” - Martin Luther King Jr.

“Mobility for the Negro is still tightly restricted. There is usually no bottom at which to start, and very little room at the top” – Martin Luther King Jr.

“In consequence, the Negro finds himself being in on an impoverished island within an affluent a society” – Martin Luther King Jr.

“The Negro did not do this to himself, it was done to him. For more than half his existence in America he was a slave” – Martin Luther King Jr.

“Of the good things in life, the Negro has half of what whites do. Of the bad things in life, the Negro has a double portion of what whites do” – Martin Luther King Jr.

“The Negro must throw off the mantle of self - abrogation. And say to himself and the rest of the world, I am somebody. I’m black, I’m beautiful and I’m proud. I am a person, and I have a rich and noble history no matter how painful and exploded at history has been” – Martin Luther King Jr.
 
Just beatifically and wonderfully said!!!