Regular price: $9.60

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

‘It was a sweet finish after the bitter pills of floggings and bullets with which these same governments, just at that time, dosed the German working-class risings’.

The Communist Manifesto is, perhaps surprisingly, a most engaging and accessible work, containing even the odd shaft of humour in this translation by Samuel Moore for the 1888 English edition. It is, of course, an essential introduction to the thoughts and theories of Karl Marx and his collaborator and editor Friedrich Engels and therefore to the development of communism.

This brief but iconoclastic work, essentially a pamphlet, covers the history of the bourgeoisie, aspects of ‘class struggle’ with descriptions and analyses of numerous workers’ parties and movements up to the 1840s. It predicts and elaborates upon the defeat of capitalism and communism’s ultimate global victory. Written over 150 years ago it pulsates with energy, insight and contemporary relevance, ending with the rallying cry, ‘Workers of the World Unite.’ Greg Wagland, a history graduate and enthusiast, brings a certain freshness and energy to his reading of this far from dusty tome. A word about the narrator: born in Oxford, England, Greg Wagland is a classically trained actor, who attended St. Andrews University and drama school. He has worked in television, radio and theatre appearing in productions with the likes of Richard E. Grant, Penelope Keith, Bill Pertwee, Matt Smith, Roger Allam, Liza Goddard, Michael Denison, Dulcie Gray and Lindsay Duncan. He has recorded over 50 audiobooks, a number of those for the well-respected Talking Book Service of the RNIB. Now for Magpie Audio he is putting together an eclectic collection of classic fiction and non-fiction works and is always happy to receive suggestions for new titles.

Public Domain (P)2011 Magpie Audio

Critic Reviews

"Our narrator has little to add, except his own words and in this capacity Greg Wagland has his work cut out. The trick with a reading of this kind is to make a clear distinction between which character has what voice, otherwise things could get complicated." (The Guardian)
"Greg Wagland’s crescendo-free rendition allows this brilliantly structured novel to speak for itself." (The Spectator)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3.9 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    120
  • 4 Stars
    52
  • 3 Stars
    54
  • 2 Stars
    21
  • 1 Stars
    18

Performance

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    127
  • 4 Stars
    66
  • 3 Stars
    33
  • 2 Stars
    6
  • 1 Stars
    4

Story

  • 3.6 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    93
  • 4 Stars
    48
  • 3 Stars
    35
  • 2 Stars
    24
  • 1 Stars
    31
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

My advice, set speed to 1.5

Narration was awfully slow. Increased speed and it was bearable. I also finished it in 45 minutes

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Interesting to see what changed over time

Interesting read from the perspective of time passed. Lot of valid points, as well as lot of radical ones that are hard to accept. The narration is a little strangely paced but very clear.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

ok

the book is a classic. yet it's read really boring, little change of voice, little soul in it. makes you rather sleepy.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

occasionally robotic, but worth listening

I listened to this book rather than reading it for school. Its short, got through it before noon. Worth a listen or two, because it can be rather dense and it's easier to understand everything the second time. The narrator is pretty good, he occasionally sounds robotic but that is okay given the content.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Good information and good narration

While I do not agree with communism in general, there is some gold to be gleaned here. The book is obviously biased, but it was good. The narration was good as well. if you are interested in understanding the roots of communism this is it.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Rational Thought Falsely ID'd

Breaks down Communist views, purposes, and goals. The motive is honest and rational, therefore political.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

informative book

cool book, a lot of good info in a short read, a lot of things spoken about apply today!

9 of 19 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Everyone who values freedom should hear this.

Maybe the most valuable piece of political education available! listen for your own best good!

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

94 Million Dead because of this lazy hack

What disappointed you about The Communist Manifesto?

I bought this book with the money I earned WORKING HARD with skills that I gained through time and effort.

Karl Marx, on the other hand, was a lazy man who blamed all his self-inflicted problems on others. He used buzzwords and blanket statements like "bourgeoisie" to drive his identity politics.He played the role of victim and convinced others that they were victims. As a result communism was used to manipulate large masses of easily influenced people who generally didn't read...
This rubbish led to the deaths of over 94 million people...If you want to know more about that I suggest reading books by the people who suffered under communism such as Solzhenitsyn.
Marx was not only historically and factually inaccurate in his writings, he passed them off as if they were the truth. In reality they were his deluded opinions based on his own inability to understand how the world works.. He was an ideologue who spoke of the "workers" yet never did an honest days work in his life, he let his children and family starve and blamed other people the "rich". He never defines who they are really, he just names anyone who he doesn't like an exploiter of labor or capital..
He was intellectually dishonest and the entire book is PROOF that he didn't understand human nature or the fact that no one owes anyone anything..
It's complete non-sense and gibberish... I wouldn't say it was money well spent, but when you work hard and don't blame others for your hard times you can afford to spend money on goods you don't need.

Has The Communist Manifesto turned you off from other books in this genre?

Yea, because communism is garbage.

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

It proves Marx was a fool.

6 of 17 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

This should be taught in school...

What an amazing philosopher who is greatly misunderstood: I hope that the working-class will revolt!

0 of 1 people found this review helpful