adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT
adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT

1 audiobook of your choice.
Stream or download thousands of included titles.
$14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $19.95

Buy for $19.95

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

The New York Times best-selling author of The Origins of Political Order offers a provocative examination of modern identity politics: its origins, its effects, and what it means for domestic and international affairs of state 

In 2014, Francis Fukuyama wrote that American institutions were in decay, as the state was progressively captured by powerful interest groups. Two years later, his predictions were borne out by the rise to power of a series of political outsiders whose economic nationalism and authoritarian tendencies threatened to destabilize the entire international order. These populist nationalists seek direct charismatic connection to “the people”, who are usually defined in narrow identity terms that offer an irresistible call to an in-group and exclude large parts of the population as a whole. 

Demand for recognition of one’s identity is a master concept that unifies much of what is going on in world politics today. The universal recognition on which liberal democracy is based has been increasingly challenged by narrower forms of recognition based on nation, religion, sect, race, ethnicity, or gender, which have resulted in anti-immigrant populism, the upsurge of politicized Islam, the fractious “identity liberalism” of college campuses, and the emergence of white nationalism. Populist nationalism, said to be rooted in economic motivation, actually springs from the demand for recognition and therefore cannot simply be satisfied by economic means. The demand for identity cannot be transcended; we must begin to shape identity in a way that supports rather than undermines democracy. 

Identity is an urgent and necessary book - a sharp warning that unless we forge a universal understanding of human dignity, we will doom ourselves to continuing conflict. 

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2018 Francis Fukuyama (P)2018 Audible, Inc.

What listeners say about Identity

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    401
  • 4 Stars
    182
  • 3 Stars
    64
  • 2 Stars
    16
  • 1 Stars
    4
Performance
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    287
  • 4 Stars
    139
  • 3 Stars
    91
  • 2 Stars
    31
  • 1 Stars
    25
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    349
  • 4 Stars
    143
  • 3 Stars
    53
  • 2 Stars
    10
  • 1 Stars
    6

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Robotic narrator

Book content was excellent, but the gentleman narrating it for audible audiobook version read it like a robot reads an official memo.

26 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Important Book; Destroyed.

If you can withstand unbearably horrible narration; narration so incredibly bad that you almost can't believe it; narration that gives rise to homicidal thoughts that you didn't even know you were capable of; narration that makes you long for (1) a chalkboard to scrape your fingernails on while (2) shooting your brains out with a very strong gun, then this is the audiobook for you.
As far as books go, it's good. It's good in terms of being read - by you... not by this horrible, bad, in need of reprimand, so bad you can't believe it's possible, so called narrator. Dear GOD! WHY! Oh Audible... Please find someone... anyone... to re-read this. The book is too good to be destroyed by such an amazingly horrible narrator. Jeez.......

21 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars

Let the author read!

I'm sick of voice actor readers on nonfiction books where the author is an articulate public speaker. Francis Fujiyama is a great communicator on this topic. He believes in it and understands it, so it's annoying to listen to someone else paid to just read the words on the page.

The reader isn't bad at his job, he's just not the expert here.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Great book destroyed by horrible reading

Is it possible to make fascinating ideas sound boring?

Yes it is! Have P. J .Ochlan speak them out loud!

I like this book. Fukuyama is great on this topic. Listen to the interviews with him whenever you can, or buy the printed book. But I couldn't even finish this book. This narration style is probably the worst I've heard in an audiobook.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Good one if ur new to Fukuyama

Nice book only if u r new to Fukuyama but if u have read his others books then I think he is not offering that much of new thing other than repacking his idea

13 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Robot voice not human

I have just finished The End of History and I loved it. I want to listen to this program too, but this narration kills me. I'll return it.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Book is good; audiobook is awful

I read this book before, and thoroughly enjoyed it. This should be required reading for any candidates for office!

That said, I tried the audiobook to refresh my memory. The reading is awful. Sounds like a very dry monotone lecture. Would be great if it were read by a news anchor.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Great Book

A fair look at identity and its influence on politics and especially immigration. I just wish that James Bottomtooth wasn’t the narrator.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Good but ignored a crucial point

The author made a good case but I believe he ignored finer points that might have painted a different picture. Perhaps that came from a lack of a hands on knowledge of what he spoke of or perhaps he was blindsided by political perspective. I think two things must be added: firstly identities can be cultivated but also can also be consumed as a product. Second: the american situation is gridlocked artificially by the involvement of money and a wealthy donor class. Identity came to the front precisely because it served as a distraction from the rising economical inequalities brought by neo-liberalism.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

great book, bad narration

this is fantastic, but it took me a couple hours to get used to the narration. listen to a preview before purchasing..

2 people found this helpful

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for AGGELOS IOAKIMIDES
  • AGGELOS IOAKIMIDES
  • 03-31-19

Is so bad that it does not allow the content work

Yes it is very theoretical. Yeah it has difficult context to elaborate on. Yes it does not have. All of this is impossible to follow with the worst narration I have ever heard! Placing periods every four words and throwing commas around, finishing the sentence in the middle, without any understanding of context, any feel for the story, and tonality that sounds like an awful commercial. I really think this book should be re-recorded because the audiobook is destroyed by the narration. It sounds like it is machine made. Dr Sbaitso, not an audiobook. I will finish it because I payed for it and because it is interesting. I will wrestle. 40% in and I suffer.

12 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Miss B K M Jones
  • Miss B K M Jones
  • 05-17-21

Impossible to listen to

The narrator has such a robotic voice and repetitive intonation it's impossible to take in what he's actually saying.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Parissa
  • Parissa
  • 06-01-21

Extremely interesting and relevant book

« Identity » is an extremely timely, relevant and interesting book, examining amongst others, the origins of group and national identity, the rise of identity politics and its consequences, the rise of populism, etc. It is very clearly and succinctly written and is a very accessible book. I found some of the ideas so interesting, I frequently had to stop or re-listen, to think about what had been said and absorb the ideas.
Such an extremely interesting book deserved a much better narrator. At first, it felt like listening to an automated voice. It was a credit to how interesting I found the content of the book that I carried on listening. Anything else by this narrator would have been promptly returned.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Adrian J. Smith
  • Adrian J. Smith
  • 05-27-21

The explanation of our present ills

Fukuyama may be one of the best known and most maligned political scientists due to his rather triumphalist End of History thesis, something he never argued as a definite conclusion and he has since revised.
Within Identity he looks at the roots of modern identity politics and examines how they play out in today's world.
Fukuyama examines the origin of modern identity, starting with the European Reformation and moving toward today's anxieties surrounding nationalism and supranational entities.
Two recurring themes are the election of Donald Trump, the departure of Britain from the EU and the movement toward more agitative nationalism from places such as Turkey to Russia.
The book is unsurprisingly America centric, as evinced in the final chapter detailing solutions for immigration reform in the US, but nonetheless Identity is universally applicable due to Fukuyama's understanding of the issue and his immense readability.
The narration is excellent and never lets down the pace, making it a highly enjoyable read or listen.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Sly Jobs
  • Sly Jobs
  • 12-26-20

concise explanation

the theory, which it is, is well documented and spans diverse subtexts despite being presented in a concise and clear manner. its a good book from a great mind

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Grumpy Old Writer
  • Grumpy Old Writer
  • 03-01-20

Brilliant

This book says everything you need to know about the political crisis we are in – fair, objektiv, deep. Thank you Mr Fukuyama

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Olly Buxton
  • Olly Buxton
  • 06-03-19

Mediocre arguments presented by terrible narrator

If Fukuyama is struggling to retain credibility after The End of History then this old-fashioned, pedestrian affair is not likely to help. Certainly not with a narrator that sounds like a speak-and-spell. Only 6 and a half hours long, no real penetration or insight into the issue du jour, citing Hegel, Kant and Hobbes like some sophomore term paper - there must be better efforts than this.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Good Grain
  • Good Grain
  • 11-12-18

Blandly academic

It starts badly with a dull disposition on the misunderstandings around his once famous but now rather dated book "The End of History and the Last Man" which really should have been left out as irrelevant to the topic at hand. It picks up thereafter but it doesn't offer anything beyond an academic overview of some of the key writers about identity over the last few hundred years and in this regard it is unspectacular but passable. Alas once it hits more modern times it becomes ever closer to a bog standard soft left editorial devoid of anything fresh to say and hence bland.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Dennis Sommers
  • Dennis Sommers
  • 09-18-21

A guide through very muddy waters!

I staggered through one of the author’s longer productions without feeling I’d learned very much but this book is succinct, clear , and covers it’s chosen ground well; from spiritual sociology-economic and psychological ositions , joining up a lot of what Michael Sandel refers to as intuitionism ethical stances into something more recognisable as a systematic way of thinking, though with no pat solutions. Perhaps some of his solutions may be a little less than practicable in our damaged world, but there is enough food for thought in a mercifully brief production to make it well worth reading and retaining as a basis for our own attempts to make sense of this seemingly intractable problem.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Amazon Customer
  • Amazon Customer
  • 03-20-21

exceptional

This book, along with "The end of history & the last man" have been the two books i have read that have helped me understand todays political climate nost clearly.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Martin David Middleton
  • Martin David Middleton
  • 04-17-19

Good book, horrible narration

I really wanted to listen to this book but the narration is horrible. Gave up. Sounds like I am listening to a computer or some kind of automaton. Don't understand why Audible can't reliably get decent narration for its books.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Marita
  • Marita
  • 10-21-19

Opened my eyes to the topic

I'd been thinking a lot about the philosophical admonition to 'know thyself' when I stumbled on this book. It opened my eyes to the very practical needs of modern society at all levels. The book was read too fast to absorb it all in one sitting, so I've bought the Kindle version and will go back over various chapters. I think it would be best read one chapter per sitting. Well worth reading and studying.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Kindle Customer
  • Kindle Customer
  • 10-15-18

Helps to understand the 'why' of modern issues

This book does a great job of creating a common thread between issues that are intuitively connected but hard to articulate. It was dense at times, and has some assumed knowledge of history and philosophy, but still peices together the role of identity, particularly in transnational issues, in a compelling way.