Regular price: $19.66

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

After Mina Murray asks Sherlock Holmes to locate her fiancé, Holmes and Watson travel to a land far eerier than the moors they had known when pursuing the Hound of the Baskervilles. The confrontation with Count Dracula threatens Holmes' health, his sanity, and his life. Will he survive his battle with Count Dracula?

©2006 Stephen Seitz (P)2014 Audible, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.0 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    7
  • 4 Stars
    10
  • 3 Stars
    4
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 4.4 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    12
  • 4 Stars
    7
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 3.9 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    6
  • 4 Stars
    11
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    0
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Satisfying

It combines Dracula and Sherlock's two greatest adventures into one, first skeptical but satisfying ending

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

A Very Satisfying Crossover!

I thoroughly enjoyed this crossover between Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes universe and Bram Stoker's Dracula. It is told in the same format as Stoker's work, but with Dr. Watson's letters and notes interspersed with the journal and diary entries of the other characters. Mina Murray employs Holmes and Watson to find the missing Jonathan Harker. They travel to Transylvania and have their own nasty encounter, and this puts them on the trail of Count Dracula.

One might expect that Holmes and Watson would join forces with Van Helsing and company, but quite the opposite is true, and here is the great delight of this novel. The reader gets to see both sets of characters from the not always complimentary perspectives of the other. I particularly enjoyed how Watson's fierce brand of personal loyalty and dedication to medicine opposes Van Helsing's -- and saves the day (and ultimately humankind).

I am a great fan of both Conan Doyle and Stoker, and I've reread the Holmes canon and Dracula quite recently. Sherlock Holmes and the Plague of Dracula provides a clever combination of both with a satisfyingly rational conclusion. One word: Science!

Ric Jerrom's handling of the different characters and accents was terrific.